Author: Kristi Arellano

Boettcher Foundation Press Release

09 Oct Alumni Board Current Scholar Profile: Q&A with 2014 Scholar Lindsey Paricio

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Name: Lindsey Paricio Scholar Year: 2014 Hometown: Centennial College(s), Degree(s): Colorado State University, chemistry major, math and leadership minors, graduating spring 2018 What are you currently interested in pursuing after graduating? TEACHING!! Well, as the end goal at least. My dream career is to be a high school science and math teacher, and that is definitely somewhere you will find me within five years of graduation. Before that, though, I have a few more degrees to finish, including a master's in chemistry for next year, and a master's in education the year after that. I am really hoping to teach internationally at some point in my career, but I plan to start off at home in Colorado. Basically, I am going to be in school for life! Tell us about what activities, groups and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. To sum it up, I am an overly involved person! I have done everything from being an orientation leader, to teaching for the honors program, to research to the President’s Leadership Program. This year, I am a presidential ambassador, representing the students to donors and alumni, which has been amazing! I also am a member of our student government working in health, specifically food security, and I am the outreach coordinator for the chemistry department. For all of these, I joined because I love to talk to and teach people, and I wanted to give back to my university! Tell us about an important mentor you have had. I know it sounds cheesy, but my parents have been the best and most important mentors in my life. They are both teachers, and so we spent every day and night together growing up. They were always really honest with me about their jobs, their work and their passions, and they are always around to talk. I have tried or started a lot of different things, but no matter what adventure I’m currently on, they are always there to learn with me and help, whether it's a program, homework, or climbing a mountain. They demonstrate what it means to enable others, always. What's the best advice you've ever received? I would say that the best advice I’ve ever been given was by a family friend who was about to graduate college as I was starting it. She said that people are always waiting for an invitation. To do things, go on adventures, to be friends, to form study groups, to go on a date – all of these things require someone extending an invitation. She said to be that enabler, be the inviter, because it’s scary and the possibility of being turned down turns people away from asking. If you ask, you will create a rich life for yourself. If you could have dinner with one or more people from history, whom would you choose and why?  I would definitely choose to have dinner with J.K. Rowling, the author and activist, and I would also throw in Albert Einstein (no introduction needed) and Malcom Lindsey, the outdoor educator and explorer for whom Mount Lindsey (and I) are named. I absolutely love Harry Potter, and I would love to pick Rowling’s brain about the books, about her activism work with Lumos and about her past teaching experiences. I honestly want to ask Einstein about his life – and also for help with my quantum mechanics homework.  And who doesn’t want to know the person they are named after?! ...
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Boettcher Foundation Press Release

04 Oct Scholarship Tips from All the Wisdom and None of the Junk: Share Your Accomplishments Without Sounding Arrogant

College and scholarship applications ask students to write hundreds of thousands of words all centered around themselves, and yet reviewers repeatedly say that arrogance is the number one thing that will turn them off from reading a student’s file. At the same time, there are students each year who are declined from selection processes not because they aren’t incredibly competitive and compelling, but because they’ve failed to fully own their achievements. We get it. It’s a mind-bender. That’s why we spend one whole section of our book, All the Wisdom and None of the Junk detailing strategies for how to own your accomplishments without sounding arrogant. The trick to striking the right balance between humility and confidence is to objectively discuss your achievements in a straightforward and factual way. This will invariably serve you better than being overly humble and therefore masking your impact or being overly proud and thereby overstating your contributions. So if you’re the president of the club, don’t tell us you “participated.” State the fact that you led it…and then stop short of aggrandizing yourself with modifiers that can rub committee members the wrong way. We give actual examples in the book, but some of these inflated adverbs are “single-handedly,” “expertly,” and “superbly.” Simply tell us what you did and leave it to us and your recommendation writers to praise you for it. Better to quantify your contributions (like citing the number of people served or dollars raised) and let those accomplishments speak for themselves. For deeper insight into this tip and other secrets of applying for college admission and scholarships, check out our new book All the Wisdom and None of the Junk. It gives students inside information – but only what they truly need to create exceptional college and scholarship applications. Learn more....
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Boettcher Foundation Press Release

02 Oct Scholarship Tips from All the Wisdom and None of the Junk: Avoid these Common Essay Mistakes

Over the years we have read thousands upon thousands of scholarship essays. And yet despite that massive amount, the types of mistakes we see tend to fall into similar categories. Generally speaking, effective essays are emotionally honest and give insight into who the applicant is as a person. They illustrate genuine motivation and goals, rather than superficial or heavy-handed interest in issues or accomplishments that students THINK we want them to care about. Boiled down, here are the most common essay mistakes we see: The essay reiterates the resume or transcript. Don’t fill your valuable essay space with information that can easily be found in other parts of your application. Students write more about another person than themselves. Many essay prompts will ask about a person you admire or who has influenced you. Even though you’re talking about someone else, make sure that you and what you’ve learned from the other person are the focus of your personal essay. Students write more about the issue than themselves. Again, some essay prompts will ask you to write about an issue or you may simply want to do so because it matters to you. Although you’re passionate about it, don’t make the mistake of writing more about the issue than about why it’s important to you. The essay is more about what happened than its significance. Don’t build up the tension with a great story that never ties back to its effect on you as a person. The student writes about challenges but doesn’t illustrate growth. Challenges and obstacles can be some of the most compelling elements of college or scholarship applications—that is, if applicants are able to demonstrate how they’ve overcome their circumstances and grown as a result. For deeper insight into this tip and other secrets of applying for college admission and scholarships, check out our new book All the Wisdom and None of the Junk. It gives students inside information – but only what they truly need to create exceptional college and scholarship applications. Learn more....
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Boettcher Foundation Press Release

26 Sep Scholarship Tips from All the Wisdom and None of the Junk: Be Authentic

The reality of reading applications is that review committee members read tons of them in one sitting. So it's tough when we pick up the 10th application that's clearly trying to impress rather than just owning who the person is. You know what we mean - we've all been in that social situation where someone pretends to like something just to get in with the cool clique and everyone else looks at each other uncomfortably. It’s painfully obvious when people aren’t being themselves. Sure, you can write about weighty issues like climate change or worldwide poverty, but only if you are really passionate about them write in your natural voice make reviewers want to meet you in person by sharing your genuine self Otherwise, we'd much rather read about your love of BBQ or why Marvel is better than DC (or vice versa). Being authentic illustrates healthy self-awareness, expressiveness and self-regard. Plus, if you write about something you’re honestly passionate about in your application, then you’ll write with enthusiasm. And that enthusiasm will be catching. For deeper insight into this tip and other secrets of applying for college admission and scholarships, check out our new book All the Wisdom and None of the Junk. It gives students inside information – but only what they truly need to create exceptional college and scholarship applications. Learn more....
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Boettcher Foundation Press Release

20 Sep Scholarship Tips from All the Wisdom and None of the Junk: Geek Out

Far too often applicants shy away from sharing the most interesting parts of themselves. As a result, their applications are flat and generic – nothing like the intriguing and multi-dimensional people writing them. Lest you hesitate to fly your geek flag and fully embrace your quirks in something so imposing as a college application, let us count the reasons why we love it when students do: People are fascinating and students who let their unique identities shine through their applications automatically hook us, Nothing is more compelling than someone owning his or her own space, Quirks are inherently distinctive, so sharing yours makes your application stand out from the pile, Embracing your eccentricities – and sharing them with strangers – demonstrates courage and self-awareness, Sharing your individuality allows us to see the person behind the application and really get to know you, Seeing the person behind the application (#5) makes reviewers want to meet you in person by inviting you to an interview or to visit campus, Knowing more about you allows selection committee members to better see how you’ll fit with their incoming class and institution, Illustrating how your particular passions translated into extra courses or other intellectual pursuits (like organizing El Dia de Los Muertos celebrations or re-enacting Renaissance jousts in authentic regalia) bolsters your academic profile by highlighting your intellectual curiosity, And did we mention that all this makes your application far more interesting to read because you sound like your own inimitable self and not like everyone else? The key is to write about topics that you actually enjoy – not that you think the committee WANTS you to enjoy. So let your dorkily unbridled pastime or your unabashed owning of your own personality sweep us up in its enthusiasm. For deeper insight into this tip and other secrets of applying for college admission and scholarships, check out our new book All the Wisdom and None of the Junk. It gives students inside information – but only what they truly need to create exceptional college and scholarship applications. Learn more....
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Boettcher Foundation Press Release

19 Sep Alumni Board Current Scholar Profile: Q&A with 2016 Scholar Benjamin Swift

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Name: Benjamin Swift Scholar Year: 2016 Hometown: Crested Butte College(s), Degree(s): Colorado College ‘21 What are you currently interested in pursuing after graduating? Currently I’m hoping to explore a bit of everything during my first couple years of school, and I have a suspicion that I’ll want to major in near every class I take. However, right now I know that—during school and post-graduation—I want to be an activist. During high school I was really involved in environmental activism, and now I’m looking for ways that I can combine that with social justice. I’m thinking that one way to accomplish these goals could be with law, but we’ll see! Tell us about what activities, groups and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. I’ve only been at CC for a few weeks, but this past year I was on a gap year in South America. There I traveled with Where There Be Dragons, learning about Bolivian and Peruvian culture and social issues, staying in homestays and eating way too many potatoes. I then worked as a research assistant with ecologists in Quito, Ecuador and the Galapagos Islands, where I had the opportunity to travel deep into the Amazon to collect samples, work at a remote field site and measure thousands of mayflies. I ended my gap year volunteering at an animal rescue center in the Ecuadorian Amazon, where I helped maintain the center and lead bilingual tours. Throughout my year I enjoyed learning about different cultures. Tell us about an important mentor you have had. Some of my most influential mentors have been my instructors on my Where There Be Dragons course. They opened my eyes to new parts of the world and new ways of looking at things that I had never considered. This was really influential throughout my gap year and into my time in college. What's the best advice you've ever received? My English teacher, Charlotte Camp (who was also my Boettcher teacher honoree), once told me to choose a path and don’t look back—whichever option I elect will be the right one. I love that advice to embrace the moment and to realize that there is more than one “right” path to achieving my dreams. If you could have dinner with one or more people from history, whom would you choose and why?  This question is hard for me. History is so vast and filled with so many interesting people that I don’t think I could ever make a sufficiently informed decision. I think I would choose an average person from history, rather than a famous or influential figure. It would be fascinating to have dinner with a group of Haitians during the late 18th to early 19th century, the time of the Haitian revolution. Haiti is the only country that successfully gained independence through a slave revolt. I visited Haiti this past spring, and, though many Haitians have experienced significant struggle and hardship, they are also remarkably friendly and delightful humans....
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Boettcher Foundation Press Release

15 Sep Scholarship Tips from All the Wisdom and None of the Junk: Be Specific and Detailed

Specific wording can make or break a college or scholarship application. Avoid the widespread mistake of over-generalizing or leaving too much to interpretation by shifting your perspective to that of the reviewers. Think about it: while you may know exactly what you contributed to an activity just by mentioning its name, strangers reading your application won't. As reviewers, all we have to go on is what you write. So being specific and detailed in quantifying your contributions is incredibly important. It’s one thing, for example, to write “Food Bank Volunteer,” and another to write “Volunteered 20 hours per week during junior year to collect canned food and coordinated food basket distribution with local food bank.” It's also key to elaborate on – and not repeat – the information in the basic Activity Section if the application you’re completing has an additional “Detailed Activities Section,” which many do. These sections give you more space to describe the three or four activities that mean the most to you – and space to explain why. Sometimes left blank and often misjudged, detailed activity sections can be capitalized on, giving reviewers even more insight into your motivation and commitment while also demonstrating that you care enough to follow instructions and give review committees the information they've asked you to provide. For deeper insight into this tip and other secrets of applying for college admission and scholarships, check out our new book All the Wisdom and None of the Junk. It gives students inside information – but only what they truly need to create exceptional college and scholarship applications. Learn more....
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Boettcher Foundation Press Release

14 Sep Alumni Board Scholar Profile: Q&A with 1994 Scholar Angelique Diaz

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better.  Name: Angelique Diaz Scholar Year:  1994 Hometown: Denver College(s), Degree(s) and Graduation Year(s): Colorado School of Mines - B.S. Chemical and Petroleum Refining Engineering (1998), M.S. Environmental Science and Engineering (2003), Ph.D. Environmental Science and Engineering (2008) Tell us about your current work and how long you’ve been doing it. What is your favorite aspect of your current occupation? I am currently an Environmental Engineer at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. I’ve been with the EPA since June 2008, and since that time my work has involved managing the program that regulates radioactive emissions from uranium recovery facilities, participating on national rulemakings, and leading interdisciplinary teams in the review of Environmental Impact Statements. My favorite aspect of working as an environmental engineer at the EPA is the opportunity to work across disciplines and programs to achieve the EPA’s mission of protecting human health and the environment. What role has being a Boettcher Scholar played into where you are and what you are doing now? Being a Boettcher Scholar, I am connected to the Boettcher Foundation and participate on the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board. Participation on this board has allowed me to interact with the Boettcher Family in various ways. With each interaction, I am in awe of the amazing things that Boettcher Scholars are doing throughout the world. I am inspired to  give more of myself in all that I do and to use my talents to give back to the people of Colorado, a state that my family has been a part of since it was a territory. Tell us about your involvement in activities, organizations or groups outside of work. Outside of work I volunteer as often as I can to ignite a passion for Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) in girls and Latino youth. My volunteer work has involved conducting mock interviews, giving resume workshops, and participating as a panelist to share my experience as a STEM professional. I have been a member of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni board for the last two and half years. I teach Sunday School, am a Girl Scout troop leader, and help however I can at my daughter’s school. What’s the best advice you’ve received and what advice do you have for new graduates entering your career field? I recently heard someone say that if you aren’t failing you are not learning. As someone that is risk-averse and does all I can not to fail, this resonated with me. I reflected on the times that I was unsuccessful (i.e., I failed...
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Boettcher Foundation Press Release

06 Sep Boettcher Foundation Awards $690,000 for Community Enrichment Projects

DENVER, Sept. 6, 2017 — Fifteen capital projects that will help enrich communities throughout Colorado have been awarded grant funding from the Boettcher Foundation. The Boettcher Foundation Board of Trustees awarded a total of $690,000 in capital grants to projects that promote arts and culture, youth development and community use.  “These projects are incredibly diverse, but the one unifying theme shared by all of them is a goal of bringing people together and strengthening the fabric of our Colorado communities,” said Katie Kramer, president and CEO of the Boettcher Foundation. “Each of these organizations is working hard to support the communities they serve, and we are honored to help advance their efforts.” This year’s community enrichment grant recipients are: Boettcher Mansion – Golden, $25,000 Toward construction of an education pavilion detailing the structure’s history Boulder Jewish Community Center – Boulder, $50,000 Toward construction of a new community and recreation facility with early childhood learning center Center for the Arts Evergreen – Evergreen, $30,000 Toward renovation of teaching, exhibition and performance space Cheyenne Mountain Zoo – Colorado Springs, $75,000 Toward the construction of new exhibits and program space Children's Museum of Denver at Marsico Campus – Denver, $50,000 Toward construction of the Adventure Forest and STEM education course Dolores Senior Center – Dove Creek, $40,000 Toward construction of a new senior and community center with a commercial kitchen Great Outdoors Colorado – Denver, $75,000 Toward brick-and-mortar components of community projects meant to inspire outdoor recreation and wellness High Valley Community Center – Del Norte, $35,000 Toward a facility offering after-school programming and community classes Kersey Community Center – Kersey, $40,000 Toward construction of a multi-use center with senior programming, a museum and a library Lone Cone Library District – Norwood, $50,000 Toward construction of a new library and community center Museum of Contemporary Art – Denver, $75,000 Toward renovation of the building to better meet current programming needs Phillips County – Holyoke, $30,000 Toward construction of a pavilion and education center at the county fairgrounds Poudre Learning Center Foundation – Greeley, $40,000 Toward expansion of the nature and science learning center Roaring Fork Conservancy – Basalt, $40,000 Toward construction of headquarters and programming facility VFW Post 1 – Denver, $35,000 Toward major renovations of the VFW Post 1 building to accommodate community enrichment and arts programming About the Boettcher Foundation: At Boettcher, we believe in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. Every day we champion excellence across our state by investing in our most talented citizens and high-potential organizations, because supporting their hard work and leadership will enable them to give back for years to come. Contact: Kristi Arellano 303.285.6208 kristi@boettcherfoundation.org...
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Boettcher Foundation Press Release

21 Aug 2017 Boettcher Investigator Research Summaries

The following individuals were selected as Boettcher Investigators for 2017. For detailed profiles of their research, click on their names. Colorado School of Mines Andrew Petruska, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Magnetic manipulation for medical applications Colorado State University Erin Osborne Nishimura, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology – Gene expression, chromatin and developmental biology Kelly S. Santangelo, DVM, Ph.D., Diplomate ACVP, Assistant Professor of Veterinary Pathology – Prevention and therapy of post-traumatic osteoarthritis National Jewish Health  Camille M. Moore, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biostatistics – Statistical methods for longitudinal RNA-sequencing data University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus  Joshua C. Black, Ph.D, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology – Epigenetic regulation of tumor heterogeneity Angelo D'Alessandro, Ph.D., Assistant Professor and Director of the Metabolomics Core – School of Medicine – Systemic metabolic reprogramming in health and disease Kristine A. Kuhn, MD, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology – Gut-joint lymphocyte trafficking in inflammatory bowel disease and spondyloarthritis Eric M. Pietras, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Hematology – Hematopoietic stem cell and inflammation biology John A. Thompson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery – Neurobiology of sensory-motor driven decision-making processes ...
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