Author: Marisa Pooley

Boettcher Foundation Press Release

14 Jun Floyd Pierce: Boettcher Scholar, Reality TV Competitor, Fan Favorite

Floyd Pierce rushes into a downtown Denver restaurant for lunch, frenzied and apologizing for being late—on his way he was stopped by an excited fan who begged to take a photo with the reality TV star. Despite earning the moniker of “fan favorite” and a being a member of “Team Fun,” Floyd is still getting used to his newfound fame. “It’s been crazy to watch myself on TV,” said Floyd. “It took about three weeks to get used to it, but by then strangers started recognizing me and even stopping me while shopping at Target.” Two months ago, the 29th season of the CBS show The Amazing Race was about to air, and we had a chance to chat with Floyd, a 2013 scholar and one of 22 competitors on the show. At the time, Floyd had completed filming but was not allowed to discuss many of the details, including who his partner was, where he traveled and how far he made it in the race. Finally, the show has finished airing, and Floyd, now a pro at world travel, can talk freely about his experience, his partner, being a fan favorite and the devastating episode in which he was eliminated. Floyd has been surprised to hear how many fans he has, but early on, he and his partner, Becca, established themselves as one of the most likeable and competitive teams. This season of The Amazing Race was the first in which partners were assigned at the starting line, so Floyd had no idea who he might end up with, which is why he feels lucky to have found the “perfect” partner. “My first impression of Becca was that she seemed fun and looked like a stereotypical Boulder hippie,” Floyd remembered. “But when we took our first taxi together to the Los Angeles airport, I knew we had something special.” It was quickly clear that Floyd and Becca were well-matched, assuming the title of #TeamFun. Not only did they encourage each other to slow down and appreciate the race, but they also pushed each other to keep a sense of humor. “A year ago today we were strangers, and now she’s my best friend,” Floyd said. Even though there were dramatic moments and the teams were racing against each other for the $1 million prize, Floyd had nothing bad to say about his competitors. In fact, the group of 22 became very close and have since traveled to Las Vegas and LA together, with more trips planned in the future. While on the race, Floyd and Becca made it to the top five, visiting a variety of countries and often leading the pack. “Norway was my favorite,” Floyd said. “It’s unreal how beautiful it is—straight out of a fairy tale.” He also enjoyed skydiving, drumming with a samba band in Brazil, building desks for school children in Tanzania and running through the streets with a giant ladder, clogging up traffic in Vietnam. Speaking of Vietnam—that was the final country Floyd and his partner visited before being eliminated in what was considered a heartbreaking episode. Becca and Floyd were first out of five when they began that fateful challenge in Vietnam, in which Floyd had to bike one mile carrying more than 120 large, wicker shrimp traps. Floyd experienced several setbacks during that challenge, including suffering from severe heat stroke. What viewers did not see is that after attempting to complete the challenge three times, the heat stroke caused Floyd to hallucinate, at which point the paramedics stepped in and Floyd and Becca were eliminated. “Going into Vietnam, Becca and I were so used to being in the front of the pack,” Floyd said. “After arriving at the challenge first, I got too focused on beating Matt [who arrived second], when I should have just worried about taking my time and beating the other teams further behind us. I also regret not trying to ride the bike more, and instead walking with it, which took more effort.” And yet, Floyd hopes to one day return to Vietnam, and try again to successfully bike with shrimp traps in one try. In addition to his unshakable perseverance, Floyd became more confident during the race. He also learned something about his leadership—that you need to know when to step up and when to follow, and you don’t always have the luxury of time. Back in Denver, Floyd recently graduated from the University of Colorado and started working as a recruiter at Insight Global, a s staffing services company. In the future, Floyd hopes to continue embracing surprises and opportunities as they arise. As we finish lunch and discuss what lies ahead, Floyd smiles and says “Becca and I would definitely compete in The Amazing Race again if offered the opportunity to return.” Who knows, perhaps these fan favorites will be returning to primetime one day?        ...
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Boettcher Foundation Press Release

14 Jun Boettcher Scholars Tour NPR Station in Greeley

By Amanda Cary 2014 scholar  In early June, current Boettcher scholars and alumni came together for a tour of KUNC, a public radio station that broadcasts NPR and other local news and music out of Greeley. Five members of the Boettcher community attended. They were: Paula Pulido (2016), Amanda Cary (2014), Doug Marek (1972), Steve Winograd (1968) and Ken Weaver (1963). KUNC began in 1967, but it was initially known as KCBL. After years of being affiliated with the University of Northern Colorado, the station became independent of the university in 2001 when UNC attempted to sell it to Colorado Public Radio. However, a community of dedicated listeners intervened and raised $2 million in 20 days to keep KUNC independent. Today, KUNC is operated by Community Radio for Northern Colorado, and monitored by a board of directors and advisory council. “It speaks to the value of the community,” said Neil Best, KUNC president. Though the station’s operations come from Greeley, KUNC’s presence is felt across the State of Colorado. There are 20 towers broadcasting KUNC programs across Colorado. KUNC was the first station in the state to air NPR’s “All Things Considered” and “Morning Edition.” KUNC will celebrate its 50th anniversary this year, and so much has changed beyond just ownership in 2001. The station has grown from a small, college station to an organization with a budget of $3.2 million that is sustained by 32 staff members and has 220,000 listeners. Best also recognized the challenges in the radio industry, such as the need to engage younger listeners and adjust to the technology shifts that came in 2007, when more people relied on streaming services to listen to their music and news. Facilities have also been among the significant change to the station in the past 50 years. While KUNC was initially operated on UNC’s campus, the station is now operated from an office in west Greeley, where the tour was held. Best showed the Boettcher Scholars where both prerecorded and live broadcasts are transmitted from, along with the newsroom, control room and various offices. The modern technology used to operate KUNC was juxtaposed with old-fashioned radio sets from when the station was first launched. The lobby’s wall holds a large map of Colorado, with 20 KUNC icons located across the map indicating the 20 towers. After the tour concluded, the group went to enjoy dinner and each other’s company at the Rio Grande Mexican Restaurant in downtown Greeley. The group was also able to check out the Greeley Blues Jam Kickoff event, an evening of live music and community celebration. The event brought together scholars who are all from different years and different fields, yet united in their curiosity to learn about a Colorado-based organization, and the desire to build community with their fellow Boettcher Scholars. **This tour was organized by Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board Programs Committee Co-Chair, Tracy Wahl, who worked at NPR headquarters in D.C. for 20 years....
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Boettcher Foundation Press Release

01 Jun Boettcher Scholar guides Greeley public policy

As a city attorney with decades of experience, 1972 Boettcher Scholar Doug Marek has helped set policy and guide legislation in both Colorado and Iowa. But before Doug was an attorney, he was a teacher.  He received both his undergraduate degree and a Master of Arts in teaching from Colorado College, and began teaching at a middle school in Colorado Springs. A few years later, Doug and his wife moved to Ames, Iowa, where he taught middle school, coached sports and ultimately decided to attend law school at Iowa State University. “For three years we were both in grad school and living in student housing,” Doug recalled. “We were both career-driven and focused on the next step in our lives.” After passing the bar exam, Doug channeled his background in teaching and became a professor of law at Drake University. He was later offered a position at the Iowa Attorney General’s office, where he reported to Tom Miller—the longest-serving Attorney General in the United States. In 2005, Doug become the City Attorney for Ames, Iowa—a university town with 62,000 people, half of which were students. “I loved being involved in legal decisions that improved the residents’ quality of life and in the development of public policy that shaped the town,” said Doug. Despite his success in Iowa, a trip home to Colorado for his 40th high school reunion ended in a job offer to be the Greeley City attorney, a position he’s now proudly held for seven years. “One of the luxuries of being a public practitioner and representing government entities is that we have more discretion on what position to take,” said Doug. “That’s different than a private practitioner who has an ethical obligation to pursue the position taken by their client.” As an advisor to elected city officials, Doug is able to recommend and steer some of the key positions that Greeley takes on litigation and local legislation. “It’s rewarding to see how you can improve the lives of people, either through litigation or long-range planning,” Doug said. Looking back at his career, Doug acknowledged that it has been the personal relationships that he’s created and carefully maintained which have led to his success. “I still contact people I worked with more than 20 years ago to ask for their advice or just check in,” said Doug. When he’s not in the courtroom, you’re likely to find Doug skiing, snowshoeing or cycling —“Pedal the Plains” is an annual favorite of his. Doug is also an avid supporter of arts and music in Greeley, serving on the Dean’s Community Arts Advisory Board at the University of Northern Colorado....
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Boettcher Foundation Press Release

05 May 42 young leaders recognized with 2017 Boettcher Foundation Scholarships

DENVER, May 9, 2017 — Forty-two of Colorado’s top graduating seniors have been selected as recipients of Boettcher Foundation Scholarships. These students have committed to attending Colorado universities where they will use their immense talents to improve our communities right here at home. “The Boettcher Scholarship aims to keep Colorado’s highest-potential students in the state by connecting them with the outstanding opportunities offered by our in-state institutions,” said Katie Kramer, CEO of the Boettcher Foundation. “Boettcher Scholars become part of a vast network of alumni and community leaders who will support and engage them throughout their lifetimes.” Established in 1952, the Boettcher Scholarship program annually awards 42 scholarships to graduating high school seniors in the State of Colorado. The four-year scholarship includes virtually all expenses to attend the Colorado school of the recipient’s choice: full tuition, fees, a book allowance and an annual stipend for living expenses. Scholars are selected based on academics, service, leadership and character. The Boettcher Scholar community includes more than 2,400 individuals who have gone on to make their marks in business, politics, academia and other endeavors. Among them are a Nobel Prize winner, a MacArthur “Genius Award” recipient, multiple Rhodes Scholars, U.S. Ambassadors, CEOs, elected officials, and numerous leaders in the business, academic and nonprofit communities. “The 2017 Boettcher Scholars were selected from a pool of more than 1,400 incredibly qualified applicants,” said Tiffany Anderson, director of the scholarship program. “This year’s class includes a young woman who helps refugees by gathering and distributing donations; a young man who not only launched his own software business but also started an incubator for other student entrepreneurs; and a student who has produced more than 15 short films. We’re confident that this year’s class represents the values that the Boettcher family sought to encourage.” In 2015, the Boettcher Foundation increased the number of scholarships awarded annually from 40 to 42, thanks to a generous donation from B. Grady and Lori Durham of Denver. Scholar names and photos follow. High-resolution images available upon request. About the Boettcher Foundation At Boettcher, we believe in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. Every day we champion excellence across our state by investing in our most talented citizens and highpotential organization, because supporting their hard work and leadership will enable them to give back for years to come. For more information, visit www.boettcherfoundation.org. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Kristi Arellano 303-285-6208 kristi@boettcherfoundation.org Jon Abrahamson Lakewood HS (CU) Daniel Barnes Basalt HS (CC) Paige Beckman Wray HS (CU) Shamik Bhat Golden HS (UCD) Camryn Daidone Denver School of the Arts (CSU) Hannah deKay Silverton HS (Regis) Ansh Desai Legend HS (CU) Lenka Doskocil Bayfield HS (CSU) Jacob Fuhrman Silver Creek HS (CU) Bridget Galaty Denver School of the Arts (CC) Leah Gibson Smoky Hill HS (CSU) Lindsey Hamblin Skyline HS (CU) Kiana Harkema Falcon HS (CU) Austin Herman Holyoke HS (CU) Katelynn Hughes Pine Creek HS (CU) Troy Jackson Lakewood HS (DU) Bradley Johnson Kit Carson HS (CSU) Dakota Kisling Lakewood HS (CU) Henry Kvietok Cherokee Trail HS (CU) Jordan Lobato Center HS (CSU) Tahlia Lucero Mapleton Expeditionary School of the Arts (DU) Keller MacLachlan Denver South HS (CU) Sydney Marchando Rock Canyon HS (CSM) Anastasia Mathews La Junta HS (CU) Jacob Morgan Coal Ridge HS (CU) Spencer Narowetz Jefferson Academy HS (CU) Armando Ocampo Broomfield HS (CSM) Nicholas Penzel Roaring Fork HS (CC) Benjamin Powell Conifer HS (DU) Harper Powell Salida HS (CU) Naitra Ramchander Poudre HS (DU) Anna Renkert Denver South HS (CC) Cherokee Ronolo-Valdez Denver South HS (DU) Ariel Sandoval Centauri HS (CU) Luke Srsen Wray HS (DU) Jenna Trost Castle View HS (CU) Casey Turner Meeker HS (CSM) Ryan Vandersmith Rock Canyon HS (CSM) Niketna Vivek Legend HS (CU) Elizabeth Ward Delta HS (DU) Lauren Weiss Littleton HS (CC) Hossna Yasini Prairie View HS (UCD) ...
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Boettcher Foundation Press Release

02 May Alumni Board Scholar Profile: Q&A with 2016 scholar Michael Gohde

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Name: Michael Gohde Scholar Year: 2016 Hometown: Colorado Springs College(s), Degree(s): University of Colorado Colorado Springs What are you currently interested in pursuing after graduating? After I graduate, I plan on attending grad school to study either computer systems or machine learning. I have worked for three cutting-edge labs for the last four+ years and they have all in some way shaped what I want to do. Among these experiences, my work with the Cox Lab at Harvard University has had the greatest influence. The Cox Lab is currently focused on developing biologically inspired machine learning systems, which fascinate me. I have worked in their lab for two years and will return this summer. In the long-term, I would like to start a business specializing in one of these fields. Tell us about what activities, groups and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. From prior experience, I’ve learned to try to stick to a few core activities so my schedule can remain somewhat flexible. I somewhat regularly attend swing dance, car club and comedy club meetings as time allows. These clubs represent some of the most interesting options available to me. I was also actively involved in campaigning for one of the tickets in the recent CU Student Government elections since I was able to meet the candidates and believed that their platform and passion made them worthwhile. Besides this, I have continued to make and distribute cancer care kits at Penrose Hospital. I also work for both CU Boulder’s Dowell Lab and during vacations, I return and help out at the Vision and Security Technology Lab at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs.   Tell us about an important mentor you have had. One of the greatest mentors I’ve ever had was Dr. Dana Wortman at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs. As my Intro to Computer Science professor, she was monumental in transforming my general and scattered interest in computer science into a well-directed vision. I attended my first class with her when I was 13, and, despite the significant age difference between all of the other students and myself, she made me feel as though I belonged in the class. She never treated me as anything other than an equal, and she always challenged me to strive for more and to do better. Later on, I took her Game AI and C++ classes, where I learned to write clean code and documentation. In the times when she was not my teacher, she was a mentor and good friend. What's the best advice you've ever received? Some of the best advice that I’ve gotten was from Dr. Terrance Boult, who told me to build solid working relationships and have a reputation as a hard worker. Working for him and taking his advice has and will continue to provide opportunities for me, and someday it will allow me to provide opportunities to others.   If you could have dinner with one or more people from history, whom would you choose and why?  If I could have dinner with one or more people from history, then I would be most interested in meeting any of the directors of Bell Labs. It would be fascinating to learn how they fostered a culture and atmosphere of such outstanding productivity and creativity within a for-profit institution....
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Boettcher Foundation Press Release

28 Apr 1970 Boettcher Scholar spends career ensuring food safety

Robert “Skip” Seward has spent the last four decades ensuring that the food we eat is safe. A 1970 Boettcher Scholar, Skip has led food safety at Fortune 500 companies like ConAgra Foods Inc., Oscar Mayer Foods and McDonalds. Skip attended CSU and later Oregon State University for his master’s in microbiology. Less than glamorous, he got his start in research by studying the growth of algae on pig manure. “Needless to say, I was not very popular at the greenhouse,” Skip said with a chuckle. Soon after, he took his first job as a bench microbiologist at Del Monte Corp.  “I’ve always credited what I’ve done to good mentors, and I had two of them at Del Monte who helped me decide that I needed to go back and get my Ph.D. at University of Wisconsin,” Skip said. At the time, Skip studied modified atmosphere packaging—placing fresh fish in packaging without oxygen for consumers to purchase—while also preventing the growth of Clostridium botulinum, the cause of foodborne botulism. He then launched into his career, moving from a bench researcher to directing food safety and eventually to serving as vice president of global food safety at ConAgra Foods. Skip spent decades working hard and advancing research, but he has kept in touch with his mentors and professors along the way, citing their influence as the reason he landed where he is today. “You find inspiration in someone, and they set you in a direction,” said Skip. “That’s why I tell people, ‘don’t forget who helped you along the way, and if you’re lucky enough to be able to give back, do it.’” Along the way he also met his wife, Dee, who ignited his passion for giving back. After receiving her teaching license in six different states as Skip toured the country with different companies, Dee retired from teaching first grade. She and Skip moved to Washington, D.C., where she became very involved with the Capitol Hill Community Foundation, which supports residents and preserves the history of Capitol Hill. “My wife has always promoted giving back, and has really taught me the value of helping others,” Skip said. “And when you give back, it sure makes you feel good. It makes the world seem a little bit smaller and little more purposeful.” He’s also kept in touch with the Boettcher Foundation, looking for opportunities to give back and pay forward his scholarship to the next generation, including naming the Boettcher Foundation in his will. Skip now owns Seward Global Consulting, which helps companies comply with the latest government regulations in food safety. He says that generally, companies want to do the right thing and produce safe food, they just need a little help sometimes. Nominated by his peers, Skip is currently in his fourth two-year term serving on the National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods. This committee is sponsored by and works to advise the Secretaries of Agriculture and Health and Human Services, the Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Defense. When he is not working, Skip and Dee enjoy travel. In fact, when a coconut water project recently took him to Thailand for four months, he and his wife took the opportunity to travel throughout Southeast Asia and China where they hiked the Great Wall for several weeks. Skip has already accomplished so much in his career, but he remains excited by the opportunities still to come. “I am still stimulated by my job and helping food companies improve their food safety. There are always new challenges associated with emerging pathogens. I have enjoyed going to work each morning because I enjoy what I do and interacting with new and old friends along the way. And it all goes back to the great opportunity that the Boettcher Foundation gave me in 1970.”...
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Boettcher Foundation Press Release

26 Apr Boettcher Foundation awards $525,000 for education projects

DENVER, April 26, 2017 — The Boettcher Foundation Board of Trustees has awarded $525,000 in capital grants to educational institutions in the state. The grant funding includes support for expansion at four higher-education institutions and continued support of the Qualistar Colorado Capital Fund, which impacts early childhood education centers. “Boettcher Foundation has a long-standing tradition of funding education in our state, and we’re pleased to do so with this group of projects,” said Katie Kramer, CEO of the Boettcher Foundation. “Each of these grantees brings communities together and prepares Colorado students for successful futures, and their expanded or new facilities will help them continue to achieve their goal of serving the state’s youth.” This year’s education grant recipients are: Colorado College – Colorado Springs, $100,000 Toward the renovation and expansion of Tutt Library, which will serve as the intellectual hub of the campus, and will help the campus achieve environmental sustainability. Colorado State University – Fort Collins, $100,000 Toward construction of the health and medical center, which will provide more efficient integrated health services for its students while also providing additional healthcare options to employees and community members. The center will also house innovative research and community programming. John McConnell Math & Science Center – Grand Junction, $75,000 Toward construction of a new facility adjacent to Colorado Mesa University, to be used both by students and the broader community. Metropolitan State University of Denver – Denver, $100,000 Toward construction of the Aerospace and Engineering Sciences Building. This building will provide up-to-date technology and real-world experiences to prepare students for successful manufacturing careers in a variety of sectors including aerospace, aviation, energy, communications and biomedicine. Qualistar – Statewide, $150,000 Toward Qualistar Colorado Capital Fund for early childhood learning centers. About the Boettcher Foundation: At Boettcher, we believe in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. Every day we champion excellence across our state by investing in our most talented citizens and high-potential organizations, because supporting their hard work and leadership will enable them to give back for years to come. Contact: Kristi Arellano 303.285.6208 kristi@boettcherfoundation.org...
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Boettcher Foundation Press Release

11 Apr Alumni Board Scholar Profile: Q&A with 2016 scholar Jazzy Middleton

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Name: Jasmine (Jazzy) Middleton Scholar Year: 2016 Hometown: Aurora College(s), Degree(s): University of Northern Colorado, Acting What are you currently interested in pursuing after graduating? I am currently pursuing a degree in acting! I’m hoping to act for a while after college but my long-term goal is to own my own theatre so that I may show how much art can positively impact any community. It’s been a dream of mine for a long time and I am working hard to make it a reality. Tell us about what activities, groups and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. Being an acting major takes up quite a bit of time on its own… so most of the activities I’ve joined have stayed very close to the theatre. I have joined some wonderful student troupes that put-on productions here and there, which has been a unique experience. I also was lucky enough to be cast in a main-stage production second semester, which is wonderfully wonderful but also wonderfully time-consuming. Even with the business of a college performing arts career, I have been attending a multitude of public events put on by various student groups. It is a great way to be involved even when you can’t join a club. I’ve also been going to youth group with Intervarsity which is a great way to meet people. Tell us about an important mentor you have had. One of my most important mentors was my high school theatre teacher Eric Eidson. Not only did he teach me so much about my craft and about the importance of pursuing my passions, but he also taught me so much about navigating life and staying positive. Unfortunately, his dorky sense of humor rubbed off on me too, but he’s a person whose qualities are contagious if you’re seeking success, so I’m not too upset about it. We’re still very close even though I’m out of high school, and he’s still proven to be a mentor to me. I cherish getting to have such a great adult in my life! What's the best advice you've ever received? Something I always turn to when life is getting tough is something one of my incredibly wise friends told me in high school. She told me “always live life 15 minutes at a time”. It seems simple but it really changes your perspective on things! If you take life in 15 minutes it really takes the weight of the future off your shoulders, especially in an institutionalized education lifestyle where things feel like they’re hitting you all at once. Just breathe, worry about the next fifteen minutes and write everything long-term in your planner. (Have a really nice pack of pens to do it with, too!) You’ll never be stressed again, which opens life up for all the beauty that it holds. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why? If I could have a sit-down dinner with Bob Marley I would be the happiest girl who ever has existed. He is inspirational in his outside-of-the-box way of thinking and his positive philosophies. He’s not one of those creepy positive people who you can just tell are faking it though, he’s down-to-earth and super meta. I feel like we’d vibe well. We’re also both Aquarians and that kind of rocks too....
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Boettcher Foundation Press Release

10 Apr Alumni Board Scholar Profile: Q&A with 1990 scholar Kenzo Kawanabe

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Name: Kenzo Kawanabe Scholar Year: 1990 Hometown: Alamosa  College(s), Degree(s) and Graduation Year(s): University of Colorado, BA (1994), and Georgetown University Law Center, J.D. (1997) Tell us about your current work and how long you’ve been doing it. What is your favorite aspect of your current occupation? For 18 years, I have been a commercial trial lawyer at Davis Graham & Stubbs LLP, one of Colorado’s oldest and largest law firms. I represent clients in a variety of matters relating to commercial disputes, mass torts and intellectual property, in a variety of industries including energy, technology, aviation, engineering and real estate.  I am a Fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, and I enjoy helping my clients solve their problems. Prior to joining DGS, I served as a law clerk for the Honorable Mary J. Mullarkey, Chief Justice of the Colorado Supreme Court. What role has being a Boettcher Scholar played into where you are and what you are doing now? Obviously, the Boettcher Scholarship paid for my college, for which I am eternally grateful. But more importantly, the Boettcher family taught me about philanthropy and working towards the greater good of a stronger community and state. As a Trustee of the Boettcher Foundation and a member of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board, I am committed the paying this generous gift forward. Tell us about your involvement in activities, organizations or groups outside of work. In the legal profession, I teach trial skills and the rule of law, and serve as the Pro Bono Partner at my firm. I was the first-ever General Counsel for the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association, and serve on the Boards of the Center for Legal Inclusiveness, CO Lawyers Committee and CO Legal Services. In addition to my legal community service, I have served on the Boards of the Boettcher Foundation, Denver Foundation, Sakura Foundation, Asian Americans Advancing Justice, Community Resource Center and CO Nonprofit Development Center. The activities I enjoy the most are spending time (traveling, eating, laughing, etc.) with my family including my wife (Irene), daughters (Mika and Aya), and 85-pound dog (Fozzie). What’s the best advice you’ve received and what advice do you have for new graduates entering your career field? The rule of law is a pillar of our democracy, and attorneys are the guardians of the rule of law. The law opens so many doors to so many different jobs.  Find what makes you happy (your Happiness Factor). While I am not encouraging you to act on whims, I do believe that true introspection will allow you to obtain a satisfying career(s) in the law. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why? Abraham Lincoln and Ralph Carr: two lawyers who followed their moral compass to be on the right side of history....
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Boettcher Foundation Press Release

28 Mar Boettcher Scholar competes on “The Amazing Race”

Floyd Pierce had never been out of the country. That is, until the 2013 Boettcher Scholar embarked on a journey around the world as a competitor on the 29th season of the CBS reality show, “The Amazing Race.” Floyd was determined to compete on the show ever since middle school when he first watched “The Amazing Race,” a reality competition show in which 11 teams of two race around the world, solving clues, navigating foreign countries and completing tasks. Each week, teams are eliminated, and the last team standing wins $1 million. But the minimum age to compete is 21, which gave Floyd years to plan his audition tape. In December 2015, Floyd, who is the drum major for University of Colorado Boulder’s marching band, convinced one of his band friends to audition with him. “I didn’t think anything was going to happen, but how could I not try?” recalled Floyd, lighting up as he remembers his bold decision.  On March 9 the following year, Floyd received a call from a CBS casting director. “At that moment I freaked out,” Floyd said. “Even if they were going to say no, I was just excited they had even called me.” But there was a twist. For the first time ever, “The Amazing Race” was not accepting pairs. Instead, the contestants would be paired with a random competitor at the starting line. The next few months were filled with a flurry of paperwork, a new audition tape and a weeklong casting process in Los Angeles. Three weeks later, Floyd received another phone call. He was officially cast on the show. As soon as he hung up, he began training, which he says consisted of a lot of running. “I think running is the single most important skill you can have on The Amazing Race,” said Floyd. Floyd then had to pack for the cross-globe journey, with little guidance from the producers. “They tell you to ‘pack for anything,’” Floyd said. Contestants must carry their belongings with them at all times, but simultaneously be prepared for any possible task, weather or environment. Floyd needed to be prepared for everything, but pack minimally. He flew to the starting line in early June, but there was still the unknown element of who his partner would be. However, Floyd was not as worried about that as you might expect. “Personally, I am confident that I can get along with virtually anyone,” Floyd smiled. “So, no matter who I was paired with, I knew I could make it work.” At the same time, Floyd had seen the show before and recognized that they typically do not cast “22 reasonable, easy-to-get-along-with people.” For that reason, the nerves started to set in. The biggest challenges for Floyd during the taping of the show? Remembering that there were cameras on him constantly, and not letting self-doubt and negative comments creep in and affect his performance. “It’s easy to worry that you may do something embarrassing on camera and let that occupy all of your thoughts, but I had to remember that I was living my dream experience, and regardless of what happened—good or bad—I needed to enjoy the ride,” Floyd said. Being the youngest contestant and the only one who had never before traveled outside the U.S., Floyd said the other contestants thought that he would be the easiest to beat. Early on, he let that bother him, but quickly realized he needed to ignore the negativity and focus on his journey. Floyd cannot yet discuss the outcome of the show, but wants to use his own experience on “The Amazing Race” to inspire others to overcome their fears and try new things. His intent is not to become famous from the show, but rather to impact others in a positive way. In the true Boettcher Scholar-style of serving others, Floyd’s throwing a premiere watch-party with a fellow contestant from Boulder to raise money for the nonprofit, Big City Mountaineers, which provides outdoor experiences for underserved youth in Colorado. When he’s not appearing in prime time, Floyd is a typical, albeit high-achieving, college student. He leads the marching band, is majoring in economics and applied math and hopes to earn a master’s degree in data analytics and work to help companies create meaningful relationships with the people they serve. He even organized CU’s very own “The Amazing Race,” during homecoming, which received great participation and is becoming an annual event. Reflecting on his experience, Floyd grins and says “It was one of the best experiences of my life. It was simply amazing.” To find out who Floyd is paired with and how far he makes it in the competition, tune in to CBS on Thursday, March 29 at 8 p.m. for the season premiere, then Friday nights for its regular time slot.   Learn more about Floyd and his fellow contestants here: http://theknow.denverpost.com/2017/03/16/the-amazing-race-final-season-contestants-colorado/139259/.   ...
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