Foundation News & Announcements

Boettcher Scholars throughout the United States participated in coordinated service events as part of the national Make a Difference Day effort on October 28. Boettcher Scholars in six communities organized and publicized the volunteer opportunity to their local Boettcher communities. We were thrilled to see the impact our scholars had in their regions and the joy they experienced as they reconnected. Below are reports from sites where scholars worked to make a difference. Colorado Springs Care and Share Food Bank of Southern Colorado During the Make a Difference Day event in Colorado Springs, 16 wonderful volunteers (Boettcher Scholars, alumni, family and friends) helped to produce more than 500 senior food boxes for the Commodity Supplemental Food Program of Southern Colorado in conjunction with the Care and Share Food Bank of Southern Colorado. These food boxes will be distributed to low-income senior citizens through such organizations as Marian House, Salvation Army, High Plains Helping Hands, Eastern Plains Community Pantry, Silver Key Senior Services, Springs Rescue Mission, Connections 4 Life Center and more. Colorado Springs volunteers made a difference in the lives of more than 500 seniors! – Carina Raetz Denver A Precious Child The Denver metro area Boettcher alumni scholars and their families had an amazing morning volunteering for Make a Difference Day! We worked at A Precious Child, a wonderful organization that assists children and families facing difficult challenges such as abuse and neglect, crisis situations, and poverty. A Precious Child helps these children and families navigate community resources and connects them with needed services, opportunities and educational support. They also help them meet needs for basic items such as good-quality used clothing and infant-care necessities, through their Resource Center. This is where about two dozen Boettcher volunteers spent the morning, helping this wonderful organization “make a dent” in the piles and piles of donations awaiting distribution. It was a fun, successful and rewarding day! – Jennifer Meyers Fort Collins All Aboard Animal Rescue Annie the Railroad Dog spent her days greeting visitors who traveled through Fort Collins in the 1930s and 40s.  Since then, residents have increasingly welcomed dogs into our hearts and our homes. This is precisely the goal All Aboard Animal Rescue supports, and Fort Collins/Golden Boettcher Scholars and alumni were able to spend the day raising awareness for the group’s foster events. Sporting Boettcher Make A Difference Day totes for our supplies, we created some healthy competition between the gals and guys scholars teams of who could place informational fliers in the most creatively impactful locations across town.  A couple of us have gotten together for various social events after having met that weekend, and apparently about 30 pups found their forever homes each adoption event weekend after Boettcher volunteers jumped aboard! – Krystal Kappeler San Francisco San Bruno Mountain Watch The San Francisco Bay Area Boettcher alumni scholars had a great time volunteering for Make a Difference Day! We worked with San Bruno Mountain Watch and spent the morning on the steep slopes of San Bruno Mountain, helping to weed out invasive plant species. We learned how to use a mattock gardening tool, enjoyed learning tons of naturalist lore from our hosts, and saw a lone coyote crossing the hillside. Five of us were there representing the Boettcher Foundation: Lee Granas, Meadow Didier, Zach Gonzales, Erin Arnsteen and her husband Jess (who drove 2.5 hours each way to join us)! Afterwards we had a great lunch together and brainstormed future Bay Area Boettcher Scholar activities that we hope to try out. It was a very fun and successful day! – Lee Granas Seattle EarthCorps Seattle Boettcher alumni enjoyed planting trees, shrubs and other native Pacific Northwest plants under beautiful blue skies at Camp Long in West Seattle. Two alumni, one Boettcher guest and other EarthCorps volunteers planted 200 saplings. EarthCorps staff encouraged us to name each plant and give it our blessing, which added a fun element to the day. McKenna Asakawa (2012) proudly named our last planting, a Douglas fir, “Claude” in honor and gratefulness for our Boettcher Scholarship founder. May Washington’s Claude grow tall and serve multiple generations well! – Karin Schantz Washington, D.C. A Wider Circle During the Make a Difference Day event in the Washington, D.C. area, Boettcher volunteers Bob Slevc (‘95), Scarlett Jimenez (‘13), Tracy Wahl (‘86) and Kitty Shaw Gardener (‘65) had a great time at A Wider Circle. A Wider Circle provides basic-need items to individuals and families transitioning out of homelessness, fleeing domestic abuse or otherwise living without the essentials of life. There were some “small-world” stories shared during the day - Kitty and Scarlett realized that they both went to Hinkley High School, nearly 50 years apart! And - Scarlett and Tracy live only a few blocks from each other in D.C. but had never met! The volunteers were all impressed with the organization and are primed to do more volunteer work. It was a great day! – Tracy Wahl ...

College and scholarship applications ask students to write hundreds of thousands of words all centered around themselves, and yet reviewers repeatedly say that arrogance is the number one thing that will turn them off from reading a student’s file. At the same time, there are students each year who are declined from selection processes not because they aren’t incredibly competitive and compelling, but because they’ve failed to fully own their achievements. We get it. It’s a mind-bender. That’s why we spend one whole section of our book, All the Wisdom and None of the Junk detailing strategies for how to own your accomplishments without sounding arrogant. The trick to striking the right balance between humility and confidence is to objectively discuss your achievements in a straightforward and factual way. This will invariably serve you better than being overly humble and therefore masking your impact or being overly proud and thereby overstating your contributions. So if you’re the president of the club, don’t tell us you “participated.” State the fact that you led it…and then stop short of aggrandizing yourself with modifiers that can rub committee members the wrong way. We give actual examples in the book, but some of these inflated adverbs are “single-handedly,” “expertly,” and “superbly.” Simply tell us what you did and leave it to us and your recommendation writers to praise you for it. Better to quantify your contributions (like citing the number of people served or dollars raised) and let those accomplishments speak for themselves. For deeper insight into this tip and other secrets of applying for college admission and scholarships, check out our new book All the Wisdom and None of the Junk. It gives students inside information – but only what they truly need to create exceptional college and scholarship applications. Learn more....

DENVER—History Colorado has announced the naming of a new gallery space set to host the latest exhibition, Zoom In: The Centennial State in 100 Objects, being presented with support by Colorado State University. The Tim Schultz Gallery presented by the Boettcher Foundation will be the home of the new exhibition, opening in November 2017. “The Boettcher Foundation is honored to partner with History Colorado to recognize Tim’s long career as a public servant and philanthropic leader,” said Katie Kramer, president and CEO of the Boettcher Foundation. “We can’t think of a better way to honor Tim than with this beautiful space that will help tell the stories of our state and its people.”  ...

Over the years we have read thousands upon thousands of scholarship essays. And yet despite that massive amount, the types of mistakes we see tend to fall into similar categories. Generally speaking, effective essays are emotionally honest and give insight into who the applicant is as a person. They illustrate genuine motivation and goals, rather than superficial or heavy-handed interest in issues or accomplishments that students THINK we want them to care about. Boiled down, here are the most common essay mistakes we see: The essay reiterates the resume or transcript. Don’t fill your valuable essay space with information that can easily be found in other parts of your application. Students write more about another person than themselves. Many essay prompts will ask about a person you admire or who has influenced you. Even though you’re talking about someone else, make sure that you and what you’ve learned from the other person are the focus of your personal essay. Students write more about the issue than themselves. Again, some essay prompts will ask you to write about an issue or you may simply want to do so because it matters to you. Although you’re passionate about it, don’t make the mistake of writing more about the issue than about why it’s important to you. The essay is more about what happened than its significance. Don’t build up the tension with a great story that never ties back to its effect on you as a person. The student writes about challenges but doesn’t illustrate growth. Challenges and obstacles can be some of the most compelling elements of college or scholarship applications—that is, if applicants are able to demonstrate how they’ve overcome their circumstances and grown as a result. For deeper insight into this tip and other secrets of applying for college admission and scholarships, check out our new book All the Wisdom and None of the Junk. It gives students inside information – but only what they truly need to create exceptional college and scholarship applications. Learn more....

The reality of reading applications is that review committee members read tons of them in one sitting. So it's tough when we pick up the 10th application that's clearly trying to impress rather than just owning who the person is. You know what we mean - we've all been in that social situation where someone pretends to like something just to get in with the cool clique and everyone else looks at each other uncomfortably. It’s painfully obvious when people aren’t being themselves. Sure, you can write about weighty issues like climate change or worldwide poverty, but only if you are really passionate about them write in your natural voice make reviewers want to meet you in person by sharing your genuine self Otherwise, we'd much rather read about your love of BBQ or why Marvel is better than DC (or vice versa). Being authentic illustrates healthy self-awareness, expressiveness and self-regard. Plus, if you write about something you’re honestly passionate about in your application, then you’ll write with enthusiasm. And that enthusiasm will be catching. For deeper insight into this tip and other secrets of applying for college admission and scholarships, check out our new book All the Wisdom and None of the Junk. It gives students inside information – but only what they truly need to create exceptional college and scholarship applications. Learn more....

Far too often applicants shy away from sharing the most interesting parts of themselves. As a result, their applications are flat and generic – nothing like the intriguing and multi-dimensional people writing them. Lest you hesitate to fly your geek flag and fully embrace your quirks in something so imposing as a college application, let us count the reasons why we love it when students do: People are fascinating and students who let their unique identities shine through their applications automatically hook us, Nothing is more compelling than someone owning his or her own space, Quirks are inherently distinctive, so sharing yours makes your application stand out from the pile, Embracing your eccentricities – and sharing them with strangers – demonstrates courage and self-awareness, Sharing your individuality allows us to see the person behind the application and really get to know you, Seeing the person behind the application (#5) makes reviewers want to meet you in person by inviting you to an interview or to visit campus, Knowing more about you allows selection committee members to better see how you’ll fit with their incoming class and institution, Illustrating how your particular passions translated into extra courses or other intellectual pursuits (like organizing El Dia de Los Muertos celebrations or re-enacting Renaissance jousts in authentic regalia) bolsters your academic profile by highlighting your intellectual curiosity, And did we mention that all this makes your application far more interesting to read because you sound like your own inimitable self and not like everyone else? The key is to write about topics that you actually enjoy – not that you think the committee WANTS you to enjoy. So let your dorkily unbridled pastime or your unabashed owning of your own personality sweep us up in its enthusiasm. For deeper insight into this tip and other secrets of applying for college admission and scholarships, check out our new book All the Wisdom and None of the Junk. It gives students inside information – but only what they truly need to create exceptional college and scholarship applications. Learn more....

Specific wording can make or break a college or scholarship application. Avoid the widespread mistake of over-generalizing or leaving too much to interpretation by shifting your perspective to that of the reviewers. Think about it: while you may know exactly what you contributed to an activity just by mentioning its name, strangers reading your application won't. As reviewers, all we have to go on is what you write. So being specific and detailed in quantifying your contributions is incredibly important. It’s one thing, for example, to write “Food Bank Volunteer,” and another to write “Volunteered 20 hours per week during junior year to collect canned food and coordinated food basket distribution with local food bank.” It's also key to elaborate on – and not repeat – the information in the basic Activity Section if the application you’re completing has an additional “Detailed Activities Section,” which many do. These sections give you more space to describe the three or four activities that mean the most to you – and space to explain why. Sometimes left blank and often misjudged, detailed activity sections can be capitalized on, giving reviewers even more insight into your motivation and commitment while also demonstrating that you care enough to follow instructions and give review committees the information they've asked you to provide. For deeper insight into this tip and other secrets of applying for college admission and scholarships, check out our new book All the Wisdom and None of the Junk. It gives students inside information – but only what they truly need to create exceptional college and scholarship applications. Learn more....

DENVER, Sept. 6, 2017 — Fifteen capital projects that will help enrich communities throughout Colorado have been awarded grant funding from the Boettcher Foundation. The Boettcher Foundation Board of Trustees awarded a total of $690,000 in capital grants to projects that promote arts and culture, youth development and community use.  “These projects are incredibly diverse, but the one unifying theme shared by all of them is a goal of bringing people together and strengthening the fabric of our Colorado communities,” said Katie Kramer, president and CEO of the Boettcher Foundation. “Each of these organizations is working hard to support the communities they serve, and we are honored to help advance their efforts.” This year’s community enrichment grant recipients are: Boettcher Mansion – Golden, $25,000 Toward construction of an education pavilion detailing the structure’s history Boulder Jewish Community Center – Boulder, $50,000 Toward construction of a new community and recreation facility with early childhood learning center Center for the Arts Evergreen – Evergreen, $30,000 Toward renovation of teaching, exhibition and performance space Cheyenne Mountain Zoo – Colorado Springs, $75,000 Toward the construction of new exhibits and program space Children's Museum of Denver at Marsico Campus – Denver, $50,000 Toward construction of the Adventure Forest and STEM education course Dolores Senior Center – Dove Creek, $40,000 Toward construction of a new senior and community center with a commercial kitchen Great Outdoors Colorado – Denver, $75,000 Toward brick-and-mortar components of community projects meant to inspire outdoor recreation and wellness High Valley Community Center – Del Norte, $35,000 Toward a facility offering after-school programming and community classes Kersey Community Center – Kersey, $40,000 Toward construction of a multi-use center with senior programming, a museum and a library Lone Cone Library District – Norwood, $50,000 Toward construction of a new library and community center Museum of Contemporary Art – Denver, $75,000 Toward renovation of the building to better meet current programming needs Phillips County – Holyoke, $30,000 Toward construction of a pavilion and education center at the county fairgrounds Poudre Learning Center Foundation – Greeley, $40,000 Toward expansion of the nature and science learning center Roaring Fork Conservancy – Basalt, $40,000 Toward construction of headquarters and programming facility VFW Post 1 – Denver, $35,000 Toward major renovations of the VFW Post 1 building to accommodate community enrichment and arts programming About the Boettcher Foundation: At Boettcher, we believe in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. Every day we champion excellence across our state by investing in our most talented citizens and high-potential organizations, because supporting their hard work and leadership will enable them to give back for years to come. Contact: Kristi Arellano 303.285.6208 kristi@boettcherfoundation.org...

August 11, 2017 — Forty-two Colorado teachers will be recognized this evening for the significant impact they have had on some of Colorado’s top students. The Boettcher Foundation will host its 26th annual Teacher Recognition Awards Program this evening at the Denver Botanic Gardens. The program allows each recipient of the 2017 Boettcher Foundation Scholarship to acknowledge the teacher who has impacted him or her the most. At the event, each Boettcher Scholar will deliver remarks about his or her teacher, and each teacher will receive a $1,000 grant from the foundation to be used toward an educational program or project to benefit students at his or her school. “Colorado’s kids deserve teachers who are driven and passionate about the work they do,” said Tiffany Anderson, the Boettcher Foundation’s scholarship program director. “The 42 teachers selected by our newest scholars have championed excellence in their classrooms, and we are proud to recognize them for helping our scholars get to where they are today.” The Boettcher Foundation Scholarship recognizes Colorado’s most talented students by providing them with a full-ride scholarship to attend a Colorado college or university, enabling them to build a Colorado network and use their immense talents to improve our communities right here at home. This year's Teacher Recognition Award recipients are: District High School Teacher Name Nominating Scholar Academy 20 Pine Creek High School Susan Nolan Katelynn Hughes Bayfield 10 JT-R Bayfield High School Derek Smith Lenka Doskocil Boulder Valley RE 2 Broomfield High School Tara Tovar Armando Ocampo Brighton 27J Prairie View High School Jessica Mauracher Hossna Yasini Center 26 JT Center High School Katrina Ruggles Jordan Lobato Cherry Creek 5 Smoky Hill High School Adrian Holguin Leah Gibson Cherry Creek 5 Cherokee Trail High School Paul Clinton Henry Kvietok Delta County 50 (J) Delta High School Ben Magtutu Elizabeth Ward Denver County 1 Denver School of the Arts Chad Russell Camryn Daidone Denver County 1 Denver School of the Arts Amy McGrath Bridget Galaty Denver County 1 Denver South High School Jason Brookes** Keller MacLachlan Denver County 1 Denver South High School Ryan Marini Anna Renkert Denver County 1 Denver South High School Andrea Griffin** Cherokee Ronolo-Valdez Douglas County RE 1 Legend High School Brent Jackson Ansh Desai Douglas County RE 1 Rock Canyon High School Katherine Hartline Sydney Marchando Douglas County RE 1 Castle View High School Roger Felch** Jenna Trost Douglas County RE 1 Rock Canyon High School Janna Robinett** Ryan Vandersmith Douglas County RE 1 Legend High School Cynthia Henderson Niketna Vivek East Otero R-1 La Junta High School Kelly Jo Smith Anastasia Mathews Falcon 49 Falcon High School Thomas Russell Kiana Harkema Garfield RE-2 Aspen High School Jennifer Morandi-Benson* Jacob Morgan Holyoke RE-1J Holyoke High School Scott Dille Austin Herman Jefferson County R-1 Lakewood High School Jennifer Webb Jon Abrahamson Jefferson County R-1 Golden High School Shannon Garvin Shamik Bhat Jefferson County R-1 Lakewood High School Wayne Madsen Troy Jackson Jefferson County R-1 Lakewood High School Sandra Sullivan Dakota Kisling Jefferson County R-1 Jefferson Academy High School Mary Ferbrache Spencer Narowetz Jefferson County R-1 Conifer High School Joshua Nielson Benjamin Powell Kit Carson R-1 Kit Carson High School Tim Hogan** Bradley Johnson Littleton 6 Littleton High School Rodney Stutzman Lauren Weiss Mapleton 1 Mapleton Expeditionary School of the Arts Tim Stemper Tahlia Lucero Meeker RE 1 Meeker High School Michelle Selle Casey Turner North Conejos RE-1J Centauri High School Margaret Salazar-Muniz** Ariel Sandoval Poudre R-1 Poudre High School Brad Beauprez** Naitra Ramchander Roaring Fork RE-1 Basalt High School Nick Lenio Daniel Barnes Roaring Fork RE-1 Roaring Fork High School Wendy Boland Nicholas Penzel Salida R-32 Salida High School Amy Moore Harper Powell Silverton 1 Silverton High School Kelly Habecker Hannah deKay St. Vrain Valley RE 1J Silver Creek High School Steve McNichols** Jacob Fuhrman St. Vrain Valley RE 1J Skyline High School David Frick Lindsey Hamblin Wray RD2 Wray High School Angela DePue Paige Beckman Wray RD2 Wray High School Nikki Gelvin Luke Srsen  * Jennifer Morandi-Benson teaches at Aspen High School. She is being honored by a student who graduated from Coal Ridge High School. ** Denotes multiple-year recipient. High-resolution photos of scholars with their teachers available upon request after the event. About the Boettcher Foundation At Boettcher we believe in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. Every day we champion excellence across our state by investing in our most talented citizens and high-potential organizations, because supporting their hard work and leadership will enable them to give back for years to come. For more information, visit www.boettcherfoundation.org.About the Boettcher Foundation FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Kristi Arellano 303.285.6208 kristi@boettcherfoundation.org...

DENVER, June 13, 2017 — Nine biomedical researchers at Colorado’s top institutions have been selected to receive funding from the Boettcher Foundation’s Webb-Waring Biomedical Research Awards program. The Webb-Waring Biomedical Research Awards support promising, early-career scientific researchers, allowing them to advance their independent research and compete for major federal and private awards in the future. Recipients are awarded $235,000 in grant funding to sustain three years of biomedical research. They also receive the title of Boettcher Investigator. “This year’s award recipients are doing important work that has the potential to significantly improve human health,” said Katie Kramer, CEO of the Boettcher Foundation. “The Boettcher Foundation is proud to help propel this research forward because Colorado can only be a leader in scientific innovation if its most dynamic scientific minds are supported at early stages in their work.” Now in its eighth year, the Webb-Waring Biomedical Research Awards honor the commitments that the Webb and Waring families made to scientific research and public service. Including the class of 2017, 54 Boettcher Investigators at the state’s leading academic and research institutions have received funding through the Webb-Waring program. “The Boettcher Investigators program reflects the best of Colorado,” said April Giles, president and CEO of Colorado BioScience Association. “We nurture talent. We grow careers. We believe in the promise of scientific research and the promise it offers to build better lives. The Boettcher Foundation and the Webb-Waring Biomedical Research Awards advance the work of talented scientists in our state.” The 2017 Class of Boettcher Investigators and their research topics are: Colorado School of Mines Andrew Petruska, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering – Magnetic manipulation for medical applications Colorado State University Erin Osborne Nishimura, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology – Gene expression, chromatin and developmental biology Kelly S. Santangelo, DVM, Ph.D., Diplomate ACVP, Assistant Professor of Veterinary Pathology – Prevention and therapy of post-traumatic osteoarthritis National Jewish Health  Camille M. Moore, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biostatistics – Statistical methods for longitudinal RNA-sequencing data University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus  Joshua C. Black, Ph.D, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology – Epigenetic regulation of tumor heterogeneity Angelo D'Alessandro, Ph.D., Assistant Professor and Director of the Metabolomics Core - School of Medicine – Systemic metabolic reprogramming in health and disease Kristine A. Kuhn, MD, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology – Gut-joint lymphocyte trafficking in inflammatory bowel disease and spondyloarthritis Eric M. Pietras, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Hematology – Hematopoietic stem cell and inflammation biology John A. Thompson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery – Neurobiology of sensory-motor driven decision-making processes  High-resolution photos of individual recipients and the entire group available by request. About the Boettcher Foundation: At Boettcher, we believe in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. Every day we champion excellence across our state by investing in our most talented citizens and high-potential organizations, because supporting their hard work and leadership will enable them to give back for years to come. Contact: Kristi Arellano 303.285.6208 kristi@boettcherfoundation.org...