Author: Boettcher Foundation

Boettcher Scholar Year: 2017 Hometown: Silverton College/Degree: Regis University – Majoring in biology (emphasis on pre-veterinary medicine), minor in art history What are you currently interested in pursuing after graduating? I would like to pursue a doctorate in veterinary medicine after graduating. I’m highly interested in the pharmaceutical aspects of animal sciences, disease research and the biomedical application of drugs in agricultural industries. Tell us about what activities, groups and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. I am currently involved in multiple clubs on campus and contribute to a research project under the biology department head. The research I am working on focuses on the bioluminescent systems of two particular genus of deep-sea fish: Paratrachichthys and Aulotrachichthys. The clubs I am currently an active member of are the Regis Ramblers Musical Theater Club, the Crochet Club, the Ski and Snowboard Club and the Tri-Beta Biological Honor Society. I participate in these clubs because they reflect my interests and cultivate student communities of which I want to be a part. Tell us about an important mentor you have had. An important mentor who has impacted my life for the better is my high school ski coach, Sally Barney. She not only helped me improve my skiing abilities, but also gave me confidence in myself and pushed me to define my core life values that I live by today. Her encouragement and support broke down my fears of failure, and as a Boettcher Scholar at Regis University pursuing my passion for life sciences and art history, I certainly am better for it. What's the best advice you've ever received? The best advice I have ever received was given to me by my father in the spirit of Leo Tolstoy’s three questions: “Always stop and reflect on when is the best time to do things, who is the most important one and what is the right thing to do”. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, who would you choose and why? I would choose to have dinner with Marie Curie, St. Thérèse of Lisieux and Mahatma Gandhi. I would choose these individuals because their humility is beautiful in alliance with their amazing influences on the world. None of them are overly grand in their philosophies and seem like they would be relatable and create an interesting conversation between each other. I also would add comedian Victor Borge to my dinner party because I think we all need someone to make us smile and laugh. ...

Boettcher Scholar Year: 1992 Hometown: Black Hawk College/Degree: Colorado State University – B.S. finance (1996); Harvard Business School – M.B.A. (2000) Tell us about your current work and how long you’ve been doing it. What is your favorite aspect of your current occupation? I'm currently on sabbatical after 13+ years at Google and a little under two years at Tesla, where I served as the CFO. I loved my work as a finance executive and CFO. It was a daily search for truth. In its simplest form, my role was to bring insights and foresights to the table each day to optimize resource allocation and decision making for the organizations for which I worked. What could be better than that? What role has being a Boettcher Scholar played into where you are and what you are doing now? The Boettcher Scholarship was quite literally my only ticket to higher education. I have always felt that since I was granted this wonderful gift that I have an ongoing obligation to the foundation – and to the scholars that have followed – to make good use of it. My view is that the Boettcher Scholarship shouldn't be thought of as an end. It's the beginning of a life dedicated to the values of intellectual achievement, leadership, community involvement and character. Tell us about your involvement in activities, organizations, or groups outside of work. I keep myself busy with a variety of different things. I'm a serial team manager for our kids' sports teams. I serve on the audit committee of Sacred Heart Schools and on the alumni board of the Boettcher Foundation. I've also served on the national board of Positive Coaching Alliance. For the past two years, my wife and I have also been very active in politics – we have gotten to know many aspiring U.S. House of Representatives candidates and have helped campaign and raise money for them. Physical fitness is also a big deal in our house.  I'm psyched to have completed the Escape from Alcatraz Triathlon twice, once in 2012 and again last summer. What’s the best advice you’ve received and what advice do you have for current graduates entering your career field? On values (from a business school professor): Integrity is binary. On excellence (from a former boss & mentor):  Winners don't believe in trade-offs or diminishing returns. My practical advice for new graduates entering finance: Hone the skills necessary to turn data into analysis, into insight and ultimately into action. When you drive action, you are adding value. The rest is just part of the journey. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why? This answer changes depending on what I am learning about at any given time. The easy answer here is Abraham Lincoln. Leonardo daVinci as well. Currently though, I have a real interest in Lyndon B. Johnson. From my perspective, his domestic policies were a great legacy overshadowed by his handling (or not handling) of the Vietnam War. I'd really like to get inside his head and understand the calculus that ultimately led him to not seek re-election and indirectly pave the way for Richard Nixon to come to power....

Boettcher Scholar Year: 2015 Hometown: Denver University: Colorado School of Mines – B.S. in computer science (December 2018), M.S. in computer science (anticipated December 2019) What are you currently interested in pursuing after graduating? I am enrolled in a master’s program with plans to work for the defense industry after graduating in the winter of 2019. Tell us about what activities, groups and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. As of this fall, I have been doing theater for almost a decade. So when I came to Mines, I joined the theater community where I act in, direct and produce shows. I am also the editor for the Oredigger newspaper's arts and culture section. I think it is important to pursue passions outside of what you are doing in school to avoid burning out on the same subjects. Tell us about an important mentor you have had. When I've needed advice, I've turned to a lot of professors at Mines. Some of the best career and life advice I've received has come from my data structures professor, for whom I went on to be a teacher's assistant. He worked in industry for years before going into teaching, which is the same path I'd like to take with my career. What's the best advice you've ever received? The best advice I've received recently was from my stage manager while I was directing a show. We had a rough dress rehearsal for the show, and I was rather stressed. She reminded me that everything comes together in the end. In theater, perfection isn't necessary for a good show. As in life, perfection isn't always worth the stress. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, who would you choose and why? I would love to have a conversation with Julie D'Aubigny because she has an absolutely fascinating story which really needs to become a play or a movie. Long story short, she was a 17th century French woman who was an accomplished swordsman, opera singer and rogue. As an aside, there is a musical about her which debuted in 2017....

Boettcher Scholar Year: 1983 Hometown: Brush College/Degree: Colorado State University – B.S. in chemical engineering Tell us about your current work and how long you’ve been doing it. What is your favorite aspect of your current occupation? I have my own business providing project management and custom database software for agricultural businesses in Colorado, including the country’s largest satellite cattle auction firm and several irrigation companies. In 2007, I combined my children’s participation in competitive gymnastics and my knack for event planning to become first the coordinator, and now the director, of the Rocky Mountain Open Men’s Junior Olympic Gymnastics Meet, held every year at the Air Force Academy. My work is different every day, which keeps life interesting. What role has being a Boettcher Scholar played into where you are and what you are doing now? After graduating from CSU, I moved to Los Angeles to realize my dream of working for the space program. As a design engineer with AlliedSignal Aerospace, I worked as part of the team developing the carbon dioxide removal system currently flying on the International Space Station. Being a Boettcher Scholar gave me the courage to make this first big move, but I always hoped to return to Colorado. In 1994, my husband and I moved back, started our family and raised two amazing children, Paul and Sydney. I’m excited for the opportunity to give back to the Boettcher community through the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board. Tell us about your involvement in activities, organizations or groups outside of work. Most of my volunteer activities have been associated with my children’s interests. I was a Girl Scout troop leader for 13 years, treasurer and volunteer coordinator for the Highlands Ranch High School Band Boosters for three years, a member of the School Accountability Committees at both Highlands Ranch and Rock Canyon high schools for seven years, and the event organizer for the Rock Canyon/Regis Jesuit High School “Catch for the Cure” breast cancer awareness softball game and fundraiser from 2014-2016. Now that I’m an empty nester I’m looking for new opportunities to get involved in the greater Colorado community! What’s the best advice you’ve received and what advice do you have for current graduates entering your career field? The best advice I received at my first engineering job was not to worry if you don’t have all the answers but to ask questions and learn something from each person you interact with. I would offer this same advice to all new graduates. Never feel like you must know all the answers, but always stay curious and open to new experiences. Getting a degree is hard work and takes a lot of dedication, but it is not the end of your education. In fact, it’s really the start! If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why? I would enjoy having dinner with the astronauts from the Mercury program. My dream of working for the space program started when I saw the movie The Right Stuff. Talking with John Glenn, Scott Carpenter or Alan Shepard about their training and experiences in space would be fascinating. I would want to know more about how they and their families dealt with the excitement and the dangers of early space travel, what motivated them to join the program and what they want their legacy to be....

On the wall of Dr. Robin Dowell’s laboratory hangs a map that resembles a Middle Earth relic. Created not by J.R.R. Tolkien, but Robin’s illustrator husband, the yellowed chart conveys aspects of Robin’s work and sense of humor: “The Sea of Data” and the “Isle of RNA Modification;” the “Ploidy Peaks” and the “Nucleo-tides.” Most importantly, though, the map captures the principle at the heart of her research: “Follow the problem wherever it leads you.” For the 2010 Boettcher Investigator, following the problem wherever it leads, and breaking down established silos in pursuit, has been a lifelong quest – one that continues in her current role as an appointed faculty member in both molecular, cellular and developmental biology (MCDB) and computer science at the University of Colorado Boulder. Growing up, Robin expressed interests in genetics, computers and working on old cars that were nurtured by her father, an engineer. While taking genetics classes “in secret” as an undergraduate computer engineering major, a professor encouraged her dual interests and connected her with a research opportunity at Baylor College of Medicine. “My path changed from that day forward,” said Robin. After receiving bachelor’s degrees in computer engineering and genetics, Robin earned a master’s in computer science and a doctorate in biomedical engineering from Washington University in St. Louis. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Massachusetts Institute of Technology before being recruited in 2009 to the BioFrontiers Institute at CU Boulder, a place she feels at home. “BioFrontiers recruits people with a unique interest in an interdisciplinary field, and then asks where you’d like to be placed. I’m in MCDB but I’ve always been interdisciplinary in my approach, so working down the hall from quantitative biologists and biochemists has been ideal. It’s made for some outstanding hallway conversations.” Robin’s primary focus is understanding the problems that lie at the intersection between genetics/genomics and machine learning. To this aim, the Dowell Lab employs a diverse mix of undergraduate, doctoral and post-doc researchers from fields such as computer science, creative writing, molecular biology and neuroscience to develop new approaches to biological questions. Robin is also very intentional about diversity in her lab. In fact, she believes that the experiences and perspectives, especially of traditionally underrepresented thinkers, are especially well-suited for interdisciplinary problem-solving. “Because we’ve never quite fit in, women and minorities are often more comfortable with interdisciplinary fields, especially those that emphasize the human component and collaboration,” said Robin. That’s one of the reasons that Robin hosts underrepresented students in her lab as well as Boettcher Scholars through the Boettcher Foundation’s collaboration grants program. Currently, with the assistance of 2016 Boettcher Scholar Michael Gohde, Robin is producing a curriculum that will translate scenario-based case studies into “choose-your-own-adventure” type stories to teach emerging researchers ethical decision-making. Michael has also been involved in the development of machine learning software for the improved analysis of genomics data. For Robin, the benefit is simple: “More undergrads doing research will produce better grad students and better problem-solvers. And for me, the long-term access and relationship I have with great undergrads will have a far greater impact than the original Webb-Waring Biomedical Research Award. I selfishly know that one day I’ll benefit from that connection.”...

Boettcher Scholar Year: 1996 Hometown: Littleton Colleges/Degree(s): Bachelor of Arts, Colorado College; CPA (Certified Public Accountant) and CFE (Certified Fraud Examiner) credentials Tell us about your current work and how long you’ve been doing it. What is your favorite aspect of your current occupation?  I have spent my career in forensic accounting and developed a specialty in data analytics. Since 2011, I have been a partner in a Denver forensic accounting firm called Betzer Call Lausten & Schwartz. Forensic accounting is at the intersection of accounting and law. We analyze accounting information through a particular lens, frequently in the context of litigation, though sometimes as part of a fraud investigation. Since 2014, I have been an affiliate faculty member in Metro State’s accounting department, where I wrote and teach a graduate course titled “Data Analytics in a Fraud and Litigation Context.” I tell my students that data analytics is the process of turning data into information. My course is equal parts examining technical topics and learning to communicate complex work. What role has being a Boettcher Scholar played into where you are and what you are doing now?  Being a Boettcher Scholar means more to me with each passing year. The connections I have made through the alumni group and at the foundation would never have been available to me otherwise (for example, today I met a potential client who worked for Boettcher & Co.). I love that whenever I talk with another scholar, I learn something new. Curiosity and discovery are innate to the scholar persona; these traits carry scholars far and wide and lead to experiences that I’ve found scholars very willing to share. Volunteering for the Boettcher Foundation helped me start my own firm and indirectly led to meeting my current business partners. Ten years ago, recently laid off, I went to the foundation to volunteer to help gather some information from the alumni database. I never expected those volunteer hours to morph into being the foundation’s database administrator and consultant, and from there to me opening my own consulting firm. Tell us about your involvement in activities, organizations, or groups outside of work.  A good friend of mine told me that when you volunteer, you should participate in an organization for about five years, then move on. He said that was the best way for volunteer organizations to stay fresh and connected to their missions. I have found this to be excellent advice and have participated in a variety of nonprofits since I graduated. I was a graduate adviser for the Colorado School of Mines Kappa Sigma chapter and served as a founding member of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board, where I also served as co-chair. For the past five years, I have been the treasurer of the Grand Lake Yacht Club. I also regularly guest lecture for undergraduates, graduates and professionals about forensic accounting. Recently, I have spent much of my time with the FIRST series of programs (firstinspires.org). FIRST Lego League Junior and FIRST Lego League are programs that help students in grades K-3 and 4-8 learn about their world through Legos, science and technology. Teaching kindergartners one day then graduate students the next has certainly opened my eyes to the challenges and rewards of teaching. I love spending time with my wife Allison and my kids, Jake (21), Cody (8), and Ellie (5). We love sailing, snowshoeing, and hiking in the Grand Lake area and I enjoy playing water polo at the Denver Athletic Club. What’s the best advice you’ve received and what advice do you have for current graduates entering your career field?  I generally offer two pieces of career advice for current graduates.  First, get involved in the professional organizations in the industry that interests you. They are almost universally interested in having student members and typically offer free or highly reduced membership rates. This gives students an opportunity to meet people in the industry, understand real industry issues and provides something much more interesting to discuss in an interview than your favorite classroom textbook. My second recommendation relates to those interested in forensic accounting. I tell interested students that success in forensic accounting requires in-depth knowledge of accounting plus at least one related subject area such as tax or audit. I recommend that students look for internal audit positions where they can get training as well as audit and fraud investigation experience. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why?  I would love to have another opportunity to talk with my grandparents and to meet my more distant ancestors, particularly those who moved to Colorado in the 1870s and early 1900s. I’d love to learn directly about what motivated them to leave their homes and what brought them here. I’d love to hear what it was like to live in Lake City in 1876 and to learn how what is now my daughter’s bed (and had been mine, and my mother’s, and her father’s and his father’s) came from Lake City to Denver....

Boettcher Scholar Year: 2015 Hometown: Parker University: University of Denver, double majors in International Studies and Media, minors in Leadership Studies and Spanish What are you currently interested in pursuing after graduating? I am hoping to go to law school in the future and would love to do international human rights. I am planning to take a couple gap years in between graduation and starting law school to work beforehand. I am looking at jobs on the east coast and specifically in the Washington, D.C. area. Tell us about what activities, groups and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. I have been most involved in the University of Denver Programming Board (DUPB), the Pioneer Leadership Program (PLP) and the DU Club Rowing team. Each of these organizations has offered me a unique opportunity to become involved in community-building projects and activities that have helped to strengthen me and have given me the ability to give back in each group. In addition, I initially joined rowing to try something new and completely different from what I had done before. It was a new adventure that I came to deeply love! Tell us about an important mentor you have had. One of the most important mentors who I have had is my career counselor at DU, Mary Michael Hawkins. I started going into her office in the beginning of my freshman year, with the plan to get an internship after my freshman year and to have someone to help me and mentor me as I pursued my goals. What started out as just occasional appointments turned into deep and enlightening weekly conversations that we still have even now. Meeting with Mary Michael was one of the greatest decisions I could have made. Mary Michael has helped me to narrow down my goals, better determine the kind of person I am and has helped me hone in on my talents while improving in areas where I struggle. She is kind-hearted, attentive and a genuinely wonderful person who I am blessed to have gotten to know over the past four years, and someone whom I hope to continue knowing for many years to come. What's the best advice you've ever received? The best advice I have ever received is to be able to say "no." There have been countless times in my past where I have added more and more things to my plate, convincing myself that I could manage and could juggle it all. Most of the time, I was able to make it work, but it would leave me feeling drained and exhausted. In the past couple years, I started looking at reorganizing and prioritizing my time. I give my all into a few things, rather than little bits into countless activities. I am able to give more fully, and my involvement actually gives me energy, instead of taking it away. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, who would you choose and why? I would choose to have dinner with Wilma Rudolph. When I was in fourth grade, I did a character presentation where I had to do research on a historical figure and dress up as them, and she was the woman I chose to present. In the 1960s she was the first woman to win three gold medals and was the fastest woman in the world, even after struggling with polio and needing a leg brace for much of her youth. She made strides for black women and was regarded as a civil rights pioneer. As a fourth grader, I found her story inspiring and I still carry it with me years later. She has been a hero of mine since that time and I would love to learn about determination from a woman who embodied it so strongly....

Dear Boettcher Scholar community, As I reflect on 2018 and our work together as a network of engaged and active scholars, one word sums up my experience on the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board: gratitude. Thank you for a wonderful year of learning, serving, building relationships, sharing experiences and growing our Boettcher Scholar community and its impact on Colorado and beyond. I am continually amazed by how much a small group of committed people can do together, and I am very grateful to be part of such a unique and amazing crew! I would like to sincerely thank our outgoing board members: Angelique Diaz, Tony Navarro, Edie Sonn and Carly Stafford. Thank you for your time, energy, great ideas and dedication to the Boettcher Foundation and the mission of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board. I am very happy to welcome four new members to our alumni board: Theo Chapman, Lori Marchando, Jason Wheeler and Hannah DeKay (current scholar representative), who will be profiled in upcoming scholar newsletters. We are so excited to work with all of you! I would also like to introduce Tommy George as our incoming alumni board chair.  Tommy has been an active and dedicated member of our board, and we are thrilled to have him lead us for the upcoming year. 2018 was a busy and productive year for the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board and the alumni community. We focused on several areas of growth and impact, including: Staying connected. We continue to expand our network through our “Class Champion” initiative. You have likely been contacted by your scholar year Class Champion, a fellow scholar acting as your class contact point. We hope this will continue to be an efficient and useful way to keep you connected to the alumni network. The Boettcher Foundation is also preparing to roll out a new scholar portal that will facilitate communication, mentorship, service and networking opportunities for alumni. Look for updates on the new alumni portal in 2019. Our Alumni Ambassador program also continues to expand, connecting alumni with middle and high school students in underrepresented schools and communities, and raising awareness about the scholarship program. Building our alumni network. New scholars were welcomed at Scholars Weekend in August, and members of the alumni board hosted undergraduate scholars at various informal welcome barbecues at their homes. Graduating seniors were formally welcomed into the alumni network during spring president’s/chancellor’s events on each campus as well as at the alumni board’s annual spring Colorado Rockies baseball game. We hope to continue these traditions, so that our newest scholars and youngest alumni are an active part of the community, are inspired to maintain their connections and opportunities for impact through the alumni network and “pay forward” the Boettcher Foundation’s investment in them. Offering educational and service opportunities. Members of the alumni network helped organize service events in various cities, a “Beer and Blue Books” discussion regarding Colorado ballot issues and an online book club. Our biggest project this year, the first Boettcher Scholar alumni summit, was held in June at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, and was a wonderful opportunity for both education and service. This year’s theme, “Make Your Mark,” allowed scholars and alumni to connect, hear inspiring and diverse TED-style talks from fellow alumni, engage in service opportunities, explore Denver and get inspired to become more engaged on a variety of levels. So…THANK YOU for a powerful year! I am thankful for the opportunities the Boettcher Foundation and the alumni network continue to give me and all of us. And I am very excited for the year ahead, and all the creative ways we, the scholar alumni community, can use our collective energy to make meaningful impact in our communities. Here’s to 2019! Cheers, Lori Prok, MD 1992 Scholar Outgoing Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board Chair...

2016 Boettcher Investigator Schuyler van Engelenburg has an audacious goal: understanding and disrupting Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). “HIV is one of the most studied viruses in the world, so some people discouraged me from entering such a concentrated research field,” said Schuyler. However, imaging techniques utilized in Schuyler’s lab at the University of Denver have demonstrated potential for how HIV and genetic diseases can be treated. With support from a Webb-Waring Biomedical Research Award from the Boettcher Foundation, Schuyler has refined the use of super-resolution microscopy in HIV, an imaging technique that won two Americans the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 2014. Using high-power light microscopes, Schuyler flags and tracks the movement of single HIV molecules within living infected cells. A high-resolution image is created by combining images in which different molecules are activated, enabling a much clearer picture of previously unobserved viral infection pathways. “We’re bringing a technical, optical, and computational approach to quantitatively describe how viral assembly works. Or if you’re an artist, think of the imaging as a type of pointillism. Except instead of coming into view as you step back, this sub-viral resolution is crossing the micro scale frontier of what was previously visible,” explained Schuyler. “If successful, we should then be able to either prevent the virus from ever assembling or harness the virus to deliver corrective genes to patients’ cells who are suffering from genetic diseases.” A native of New Castle on Colorado’s western slope, Schuyler earned a bachelor’s in chemistry from Fort Lewis College and graduated from the University of Colorado Boulder with a Ph.D. in biochemistry. He was offered a postdoctoral fellowship at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, where he studied cell biology and optics under National Academy of Sciences member Dr. Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz. Schuyler’s experience at NIH was transformative, but he has enjoyed returning to Colorado, where, as an assistant professor of biological sciences at the University of Denver, he is able to teach and mentor the next generation of interdisciplinary biomedical researchers. “I’m excited by the thought of coming up with new technology and applying it to understand how our cells work at the molecular level. But all the while I want to mentor the next best and brightest scientists who can hopefully go on to make an impact on our understanding of biology in health and disease,” noted Schuyler. “That includes undergraduate [Boettcher] scholars who have been a great asset in my lab.” When asked if working with the smallest particles in the world was constrictive, Schuyler noted that his work was remarkably similar to astrophysics and astronomers in search of macro understanding. “In many ways, microscopy is riding on the tail of astronomers, who have led the research to see beyond what we can even imagine. The infinitesimally large universe and the inconceivably small nanoscale particles are ordered more similarly than we recognize. My work lends a perspective on the rules of bioassembly on this nanoscale.”...

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Boettcher Scholar Year: 2015 Hometown: Colorado Springs University: Colorado School of Mines - B.S. Mechanical Engineering, May 2019; M.S. Computer Science, May 2020 What are you interested in pursuing after graduating? This past summer I had the pleasure of working at a robotics startup called Misty Robotics in Boulder. It was a new experience for me, and I loved it. The company was only about 40 people and had only been around for about two years. I loved the tight-knit feel and the ability to work so closely with a new product. Because of this experience, I’m definitely considering robotics startups after I graduate. Of course, I have one additional year of grad school after I finish my undergrad before I dive into the real world. Tell us about what activities, groups and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. I’m a huge robotics nerd, so of course I joined robotics club when I started college. This has by far been my favorite activity. When I first joined, the organization only had about 10 members and no budget. Now, three years later, we’re 60 members strong and have a $10,000 budget. It’s been amazing to help grow this organization into a powerful force on campus. Even more so, I’ve loved meeting all the intelligent and hardworking people that are part of robotics. Outside of robotics, Society of Women Engineers also holds a special place in my heart. I’m all about women’s empowerment. Tell us about an important mentor you have had. I realize it is cliché, but nobody in my life stacks up to my dad. Whenever I come across a situation I can’t face on my own, my dad is the first person I call. I think what I appreciate the most about my father is he has raised me and my three sisters to be strong women. Just because we are girls didn’t mean we couldn’t do construction work in high school or be engineers. I continue to appreciate his mentorship to help make me the fiercely independent woman I am. I would be nothing without his continued guidance. What's the best advice you've ever received? Though not necessarily advice, one of my very best friends has a life motto of “just having fun.” As a Boettcher Scholar, fun is usually on the bottom of my list. Goals, expectations and responsibilities come first. It was not until I met this friend that I considered letting fun guide your life. But why shouldn’t it? I think about this often now. I think if you’re having fun and truly enjoying what you’re doing, your impact on the world will be far greater. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, who would you choose and why? I would love the chance to speak with Alan Turing. It would be so interesting to see how his mind works. I think it would be fascinating to hear about his work during World War II not simply from a factual perspective but also to hear about how he actually thought about what he was doing and its influence. I would also love to tell him how profoundly his work in computer science has influenced our world today and hear his thoughts on that. Also, how cool would it be to watch him experience a laptop for the first time?  ...