Author: Boettcher Foundation

By Amelia Atencio For those reading this blog, I have the distinct pleasure of being the first of many guest authors to share my story. The first piece of financial advice I received was a snippet I overheard from a Youtube video, “Aim to save a year’s worth of your salary at any given point in your life. This way, if anything were to happen, you could secure your livelihood while you re-gain your footing.” For those I haven’t had the pleasure of meeting yet, I am Amelia Atencio, a 2014 Scholar and ’18 Colorado College Alumna. Growing up, money was tight in my household and I was always aware of the cost of living. Years like 2008 were challenging and others like 2014 were filled with promise. If, like me, you’re shifting in your seat because this is a slightly uncomfortable topic, that’s because talking about money is taboo. Korrena Bailie, a consumer finance editor at Forbes Advisor says, “Not talking about money can have sweeping social effects, like stopping women from getting equal pay for equal work in the workplace.” March is Women’s History Month - a time to celebrate the achievements of woman across the world and a time to have conversations that carry the torch forward for equal rights, equal pay, and equal representation. I should share that I do not work in finance, I am just a young woman who wants to be able to better manage my money and be financially secure. I want the same for all women. So, how do we help women better manage their money? First, we can begin by being candid and not being embarrassed by financial conversations. Secondly, we can share resources, tips, and empower women to be champions of their own financial security. Most importantly of all, we can make banking and investing more accessible to women. I recently attended an event with History of Colorado to learn more about The Women’s Bank. One of Colorado's and Boettcher’s own champions, Judi Wagner helped found the Women’s Bank in Denver, CO. in 1978. At the time, banks were not favorable to women and until 1974 women still needed a male co-signer to open a bank account or line of credit. This law prevented many female settlers and widowed businesswomen from using a bank to manage their assets. Unlike other female-chartered banks in the U.S., this bank was intended for women. On opening day, they took in over $1 million dollars from women in the community. The success of the bank was so profitable that the annual return averaged ~14%. This success continued for 16 years until 1994 when the bank was acquired by the Colorado Business Bank. During the virtual event, I had the pleasure of asking Judi Wagner, “What advice would you share with women managing their money?” and she said, “To invest.” Not only should women learn to invest, but they should also create portfolios that will allow them to “sleep well at night” and are resilient to market bubbles. A great place to start is ElleVest, but she also stressed the importance of interviewing several brokers to ensure you trust the person managing your investments. I also asked Judi if she thought banking was more welcoming today. She said, “Yes, of course. There are many women in banking and investment roles today.” She also pointed to Jane Fraser saying, “We have come a long way, but there is still much work to be done.” Jane Fraser is a poignant example because she was appointed the CEO of Citigroup this past year — the first female CEO of a large financial institution. While her accomplishment marks an incredible achievement for women, it is also a reminder that appointing women in high-ranking positions is long overdue. Though March is coming to a close, it is important that the work continues. How can you empower the women in your life to play an active role in their finances? Perhaps you can start having conversations with your children at a young age or help them set up their first bank account. Or, if you are well versed in financial planning or investing, you can share your resources with women you mentor at work. At the end of the day, what matters most is dismantling the stigma around money and we can all do that by having candid conversations. Money doesn’t have to be so mysterious....

DENVER, February 9, 2021 — University of Colorado Colorado Springs (UCCS) senior Sara Khammash was named Colorado Leadership Alliance’s (CLA) 2021 Student Leader of the Year at the CLA summit on Feb. 13. The annual award is given by the Denver Metro Chamber Leadership Foundation and the Boettcher Foundation. “Sara’s commitment to service was strong in both quality and quantity,” said Tiffany Anderson, director of programs at the Boettcher Foundation. “It was clear that she valued helping others not for her own benefit or self-fulfillment, but out of a genuine desire to serve others in the UCCS and Colorado Springs communities." Sara is a member of the Chancellor’s Leadership Class (CLC) at UCCS. As the CLC’s service coordinator, she hosted their first CLC Alumni and Scholar Day of Service. She is also the president of the university’s first Middle East and Northern Africa (MENA) club. Outside of school, Sara has, among other service projects, collected and distributed supplies to Jordanian refugees, volunteered as a tutor at Bear Creek Elementary School, and volunteered in the Emergency Department of Penrose St. Francis hospital. As a biology major with emphasis on biomedical science, Sara will be graduating UCCS in the summer of 2021 with summa cum laude honors. The Colorado Leadership Alliance works to bring together leadership programs, directors, and students from college campuses across Colorado, in order to define and address community needs. Find out more at denverleadership.org/colorado-leadership-alliance....

Initiative components to invest in leaders, connect organizations and communities DENVER, February 9, 2021 — Today, the Boettcher Foundation is announcing a new initiative that will connect individuals, organizations, and communities as part of the organization’s vision to invest in courageous leadership and community-building across Colorado. Called COLead, the initiative is the outcome of the Foundation’s year-long effort to discern how it can build a connected, inclusive, and accessible leadership ecosystem that serves all of Colorado. “This work is a continuation of our 84 year history of investing in human capital,” said Katie Kramer, president & CEO of the Boettcher Foundation. “COLead represents our strategic approach to elevate community champions, strengthen leadership networks, and convene stakeholders in a unique way that will propel Colorado forward.” The initiative will feature a portfolio of programming, communications, and grantmaking investments (outlined below) beginning in 2021 with other components phased in over time. The name of COLead was designed to mean a group of Colorado individuals who collaborate to advance community leadership. Beginning in late 2019, the Foundation began convening community leaders from throughout Colorado to better understand the assets, needs, and opportunities of the leadership landscape. From talking with nearly 180 individuals from nearly 139 organizations, Kramer noted several themes emerged from those conversations. Stakeholders agreed that several core areas could strengthen the leadership ecosystem in Colorado – elimination of barriers to access leadership opportunities, more diversification of participants within leadership programs, stronger collaboration among organizations and individuals, and more emphasis on leadership development. “The Foundation is uniquely positioned to champion leadership and strengthen the ecosystem,” Kramer said. “We have a long-standing and deep history with the organizations, community issues, and people in rural, urban, and suburban Colorado. And there is so much for us to learn as we embark on this journey.” COLead will launch in 2021 with four components: Fellowship: The Fellowship will identify, celebrate, elevate, and connect the community champions from across Colorado who serve as both informal and formal leaders. The Foundation will announce the first cohort in the fall. Leadership Collaborative: The collaborative will create a space for stakeholders to come together to advance leadership in their organizations, communities, and regions. The intent is to share knowledge, access resources, and amplify impact. Leadership Stories: The story project will help define what leadership means to Coloradans, telling the stories of community champions who are both formal and informal leaders. Leaders of all ages, backgrounds, industries, and geographies are impactful in our state’s leadership ecosystem – and the Foundation will celebrate them and share their narratives. Ecosystem Map: To best support leadership in Colorado, the Foundation aims to understand the leadership ecosystem and how it functions. To that end, it will develop a leadership ecosystem map that identifies and visually represents the individuals, organizations, communities, and/or institutions who are part of the leadership landscape and the connections that exist between them. “To fulfill the promise of Colorado and potential of Coloradans means we need to focus on leadership and leverage the power of connection and collaboration,” Kramer said. “We operate under the belief that investment in leadership pays off for decades, far after the philanthropic contribution has been spent.” For more information on the COLead Initiative, visit boettcherfoundation.org About the Boettcher Foundation At the Boettcher Foundation, we believe in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. Every day we champion excellence across our state by investing in our most talented citizens and high-potential organizations, because supporting their hard work and leadership will enable them to give back for years to come....

DENVER, January 29, 2021 — The Boettcher Foundation Board of Trustees is delighted to announce its new slate of officers for the year. Officers for 2021 are: Chair – Sharon Linhart, founder of Linhart Public Relations; Chair-elect – Tony Frank, chancellor of the Colorado State University system; Secretary – Michelle Lucero, chief administrative officer and general counsel for Children's Hospital Colorado; Treasurer – Judith Buck Wagner, founder of Wagner Investment Management; and Past-chair – Kenzo Kawanabe, partner with Davis Graham & Stubbs.   “The Boettcher Foundation relies on the wisdom and diverse perspectives of these community leaders,” said Katie Kramer, president and CEO of the Boettcher Foundation. “Our incredible Trustees help shape and guide our mission to ensure that the Foundation’s resources are aligned with Colorado’s opportunities and needs.” The Board of Trustees have also approved David Miller, CEO of Barton Institute for Community Action, and Rick Pederson, a principal at Bow River Capital Partners, for their second three-year terms. About the Boettcher Foundation At the Boettcher Foundation, we believe in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. Every day we champion excellence across our state by investing in our most talented citizens and high-potential organizations, because supporting their hard work and leadership will enable them to give back for years to come....

Boettcher Scholar Year: 2004 Hometown: Aurora, CO College/Degree: Colorado School of Mines for BS in Petroleum Engineering; Rice University for MBA Tell us about your current work and how long you’ve been doing it. What is your favorite aspect of your current occupation? I am currently a director of reservoir engineering and analytics at a small private equity backed oil and gas company that produces mostly natural gas. I live at the intersection of subsurface understanding and finance. I love that I get to deploy machine learning regularly to help make business decisions and that I get to help people in the organization develop. What role has being a Boettcher Scholar played into where you are and what you are doing now? Boettcher has been a great support infrastructure throughout my academic and professional career. Support started with funding of undergraduate research and a more recent example is through personal development coaching. Throughout my career Boettcher has provided substantial support beyond the scholarship that I have found helpful. Tell us about your involvement in activities, organizations, or groups outside of work. Outside of work I am most active through a startup nonprofit focused on early childhood education for at-risk children, where I am the president: Harbor School, Inc. I also participate in a few professional organizations around the topics of oil and gas, energy, engineering, and business. What’s the best advice you’ve received and what advice do you have for current graduates entering your career field? "A wise man can learn from a fool, but a fool can learn from no-one." It's a riff on a quote from Bruce Lee. I think these are wise words to live by whether professional or personal, and I try. If you are entering my career path today or you are starting out as a STEM professional I would recommend focusing in on people and soft skills. Both will matter as much as your technical skills. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, who would you choose and why? Right now the person I wish I could talk to most is James Baldwin. James Baldwin seemed to have understood a lot of things that would help us understand and fix many issues we deal with today as they relate to race (and class and sexuality) in America....

DENVER, December 23, 2020 — The Boettcher Foundation has awarded more than $10.6 million in grants and scholarships in 2020. The grantees include organizations leading transformational initiatives, connecting communities through infrastructure or programming, and others increasing leadership opportunities. A major focus of the Foundation’s grantmaking also emphasized rural depth and statewide breadth. “Our philanthropic support this past year reflects our mission to invest in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans,” said President & CEO Katie Kramer. “2020 was an unprecedented year in so many ways, and we remain as committed as ever to organizations and individuals who continue to lead transformational work in their respective communities.” The Foundation continued its longtime investment in biomedical research through its support of the Webb-Waring Biomedical Research Program. In addition to announcing its 11th class of Boettcher Investigators, Boettcher created the COVID-19 Biomedical Research Innovation Fund and supported the Help Colorado Now statewide relief work in response to the pandemic. Meanwhile, the Boettcher Scholarship Program added 42 Scholars to its influential network. To date, the Foundation has invested more than $105 million in 2,672 Colorado students dating back to 1952. Below are additional details about some of our 2020 grant and scholarship recipients. FOCUS AREA: PROMISE OF COLORADO San Luis Valley Ski-Hi Event Center ($100,000): Located in Monte Vista, this new facility will feature a conference center and multiple indoor athletic courts. The complex has long served as an anchor for the community and the new, modern version is vital to the future health and prosperity of the region. Center for African American Health Hudson Street Facility ($75,000): The Center for African American Health is the preeminent organization focusing on the health of Colorado’s African American residents. Their new facility will increase the organization’s capacity to serve clients and collaborate with numerous onsite partners. Rural Theaters Support Fund ($50,000): Movie theaters are local hubs for entertainment, education, and civic life in rural Colorado. In partnership with other foundations and the State of Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade, the fund will help ensure rural theaters can reopen their doors after the COVID-19 pandemic. RISE Planning and Design Support Grants ($25,000): In September 2020, Governor Jared Polis announced the $32.7 million Response, Innovation, and Student Equity (RISE) Education Fund to help Colorado address the learning challenges that students are facing due to COVID-19. Our assistance for RISE planning grants helps eligible educational organizations develop their initiatives and strengthen their applications to the fund. Prodigy Coffeehouse – Globeville Expansion ($25,000): Prodigy employs future community leaders through an intensive apprenticeship program that builds skills, mindsets, and economic capital for sustainable careers. The second location will double the number of apprentices employed and help unleash the talent of the Globeville neighborhood. FOCUS AREA: POTENTIAL OF COLORADANS Denver Metro Chamber Leadership Foundation – Civic DNA Fellows ($25,000): In 2020 we continued to empower Colorado’s leaders through support of the Civic DNA Fellows program. The eight-month, cohort-based experience helps leaders with a demonstrated community commitment further develop their leadership skills so they can increase their civic impact. Latino Leadership Institute ($10,000): The Latino Leadership Institute (LLI) at the University of Denver advances Latino professionals to positions of influence and prepares organizations for a more diverse and equitable future. The fellowship program and leadership and inclusion trainings emphasize Latino leaders from across Colorado who work in different sectors and industries. Webb-Waring Biomedical Research Program ($1.8 million): This year’s awards supported eight promising, early career Investigators, allowi­ng them to establish their independent research and be more competitive for major federal and private awards. Each recipient is awarded $235,000 in grant funding to sustain up to three years of biomedical research. Including the class of 2020, 76 Boettcher Investigators have received funding through the Webb-Waring program. Since 2010, Investigators have gone on to earn a collective $100 million in subsequent independent research funding. For more information, please visit here. Boettcher Scholarship Program ($4.1 million): The 2020 Boettcher Scholar class include the founder of a nonprofit organization that provides cybersecurity services, a composer for ballet and jazz routines, and the founding board member of the Native American Youth Summit. The cohort of 42 Scholars mark the newest class of students who will be the next generation of Colorado’s dynamic thinkers and leaders. The Boettcher Scholar network includes more than 2,600 Alumni who have made their marks in business, government, the nonprofit sector, and academia, among other industries. The four-year scholarship, established in 1952, includes full tuition and fees, a book allowance, and an annual stipend for living expenses. For more information, please visit here. COVID-19 RESPONSE COVID Biomedical Research Innovation Fund (Approximately $1 million): In May, the Foundation awarded six grantees with a total of just under $1 million in biomedical research funding to fight COVID-19 and future pandemics. The grantees represent several of  Colorado’s top research hospitals, universities – and included several partnerships. The grantees were selected from a pool of 120 applicants; they are collectively leading research efforts around COVID-19 risk factors, treatment, testing, and vaccines. For more information, please visit here. Help Colorado Now COVID Relief Fund ($100,000): Hosted by the State of Colorado and Mile High United Way and administered by a committee of community leaders from across Colorado, the Help Colorado Now fund has provided more than $20 million to aid Colorado communities affected by COVID-19 and organizations working in prevention, impact, and recovery.   About the Boettcher Foundation At the Boettcher Foundation, we believe in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. Every day we champion excellence across our state by investing in our most talented citizens and high-potential organizations, because supporting their hard work and leadership will enable them to give back for years to come....

Felisa Gonzales Boettcher Scholar Year: 1997 Alma Mater: Colorado College What does being a Boettcher Scholar mean to you? Being a Boettcher Scholar means that someone believed enough in me and my potential to support my undergraduate education. It means being part of a community of smart and caring people who reflect the diversity of talent in Colorado and share a commitment to giving back. What inspires you to get more involved with the Boettcher Foundation? I haven’t been involved with the Boettcher Foundation and am very much looking forward to becoming more connected with Boettcher Scholars and leaders in Colorado. The Boettcher Foundation has invested in me, and I look forward to now having the opportunity to invest some of my time and skills into the efforts of the Alumni Board. What is one overarching thing you hope to accomplish as a member of the Alumni Board? I’m interested in accomplishing two things as a member of the Alumni Board: 1) increasing our understanding of the contributions of the Alumni Board to the Boettcher Foundation’s efforts and 2) increasing outreach to, and connections among, scholars from Southern Colorado. What’s one interesting fact about you that might surprise others? I’ve developed an interest in the flora and fauna of Colorado and have started trying to identify flowers and birds on hikes and walks with my partner and son. Dominic DiSanti Boettcher Scholar Year: 2005 Alma Mater: Colorado State University What does being a Boettcher Scholar mean to you? Boettcher Scholars represent Colorado’s finest in terms of scholastic achievement, leadership, and community service. I am humbled and proud to be a part of this community that represents the best of Colorado. What inspires you to connect with and/or get more involved with the Boettcher Foundation? It is very important to me that I give back in any way possible to the Boettcher community. I am so grateful for the opportunities that the Boettcher Foundation gave to me, and I am eager to pay it forward. I am at a point in my career where I feel I could provide a unique perspective to the Scholar and Alumni community. What is one overarching thing you hope to accomplish as a member of the Alumni Board? I am most looking forward to reconnecting with the Alumni and Scholar community. I aim to provide meaningful insight and perspective from rural Colorado. What’s one interesting fact about you that might surprise others? As a Colorado native, many are surprised to hear that I have never been skiing. Perhaps an Alumni event on the slopes could change that!...

Mary Margaret Hesse Boettcher Scholar Year: 1992 Alma Mater: CU Boulder What does being a Boettcher Scholar mean to you? Receiving the Boettcher Scholarship changed my life by freeing me from pressing concerns about how to pay for college. My continued affiliation with the Boettcher Foundation has given me many opportunities to continue learning and to maintain and make contact with delightful people. What inspires you to get more involved with the Boettcher Foundation? I am grateful for the many opportunities the Boettcher Scholarship gave me and I enjoy helping to extend the Boettcher Foundation's reach a bit on Colorado's western slope. What is one overarching thing you hope to accomplish as a member of the Alumni Board? I look forward to getting to know other members of the Alumni Board and assisting in any way I can. What’s one interesting fact about you that might surprise others? I have enjoyed serving as an international election observer in eastern Europe in recent years, at least until COVID. I can affirm after observing Belarus's parliamentary elections last year that chaotic American democracy is infinitely preferable to eerie autocracy. Griffin Hampton Boettcher Scholar Year: 2018 Alma Mater: Colorado School of Mines What does being a Boettcher Scholar mean to you? I believe that being a Boettcher Scholar means that you actively seek out opportunities to improve yourself and your community. A Boettcher Scholar also finds ways to persevere and enjoy their journey through life, looking for enriching unique experiences. What inspires you to connect with and/or get more involved with the Boettcher Foundation? I have valued the connections that I have made within the Boettcher community. I want to make sure that there are opportunities for other Scholars to make similar connections and that they take advantage of them. What is one overarching thing you hope to accomplish as a member of the Alumni Board? I plan to dedicate my overarching focus on the Alumni Board to encourage stronger relationships between the current Scholars and the Alumni network. I believe this will primarily come from the Boettcher Buddy program. Still, I will be thinking about other avenues and ways to encourage involvement in programs like Boettcher Buddies. What’s one interesting fact about you that might surprise others? I can count up to 31, using only one of my hands....

Mission Spark, a social impact consulting firm founded by 1994 Boettcher Scholar Kara Penn, continues a close relationship to Boettcher Scholars by selecting Scholars and other high performing undergraduate and graduate students, or recent graduates, interested in social impact careers to serve as Mission Spark Fellows. Each year, Mission Spark offers paid fellowships to dynamic and social impact-minded individuals. Fellows receive mentorship on career and educational pathways from Mission Spark consultants, as well as six sessions of professional and personal development coaching by a CTI-trained coach through the Boettcher Coaching Program. In addition, Fellows work independently on high impact projects, with guidance from Mission Spark consultants and clients. Current Mission Spark Fellow and 2019 Boettcher Scholar, Anila Narayana, is a sophomore at the University of Colorado Boulder studying Integrative Physiology, Geography, and Public Health. She is interested in helping close gaps in healthcare access for marginalized communities. Anila shares, “Working at Mission Spark has been an irreplaceable experience for me. Being a Fellow has given me the opportunity to work on projects important to me and specific to my interests in health and equity. Specifically, I have been helping draft data products based on the Health eMoms survey conducted by CDPHE, highlighting inequities in paid family leave in Colorado. I’ve also been able to work with Her Future Coalition, an NGO empowering survivors of human trafficking, to create business plans for a social enterprise recycling center in Kolkata, India, and to revamp their impact tourism programming. Contributing to these areas has taught me how to create a data-driven story and improved my research skills, while also helping me explore how I can better incorporate activism into my future career. In addition, the coaching experience provided by Mission Spark has prompted me to more intentionally examine my goals for the future, growing my sense of self in the process. I am incredibly grateful to be part of a network that connects me to such meaningful opportunities and values my development, both professionally and personally.” 2016 Mission Spark Fellow and 2013 Boettcher Scholar Alumna, Scarlett Jimenez, now serves as the Development Director for Alliance for Youth Action. She shares that “As a fellow at Mission Spark in 2016, I had the opportunity to support the robust re-visioning process for the Denver Public School’s teacher performance pay incentive program, ProComp. This process brought together stakeholders including the District and Denver Classroom's Teacher Association (DCTA) to review national research related to teacher incentives and tackle the unique challenges and opportunities within the Denver Public School district. At the time of my fellowship, I was a rising Senior at the University of Denver and saw a clear connection from this work to my public policy studies, so I pursued turning this experience into an independent study. Working alongside Professor Robert Fusfeld, I dove into the world of theory and research surrounding teacher performance to both inform my time at Mission Spark and jumpstart a career in social impact work. As an almost lifelong community organizer and political science/public policy major, I knew I wanted to pursue a career in social justice. My time with Mission Spark broadened my perspective of what a career in public service and social impact could look like and cemented my commitment to this work. After graduating, I took a role with the Alliance for Youth Action in Washington, DC. Today, I serve as the Alliance's Development Director, leading our efforts to partner with philanthropy and individual donors to build young people's political power. We are a network of locally-rooted grassroots organizations across the country (including a fantastic Colorado affiliate!). I continue to be grateful for my experience with Mission Spark and the opportunity to work closely with public stakeholders and explore emerging approaches for creating a more just and equitable system for young people.” The Mission Spark Fellowship represents a unique and informal collaboration between an organization run by a Scholar Alum and the Boettcher Scholar Program, by creating mentorship and career opportunities for current or recently graduated Scholars. For more information or to become involved by contributing a project for Fellows to tackle or to be considered as a Fellow in the future, please reach out to Kara Penn at kara@missionspark.org....

From going through the same degree program to working at the same company, Boettcher Scholars Christopher Allison and Jake Fuhrman have a lot in common. Christopher always wanted to be an astronaut – and that’s still his dream. A 2009 Scholar, he majored in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder, the same program Jake is in as a 2017 Scholar. Both Scholars shared a few of the same professors. “CU was the obvious go-to for aerospace,” said Jake. He always wanted to build airplanes after growing up watching his dad fly them as a pilot. After graduating, Christopher traveled to all seven continents and even ran his first half-marathon in Antarctica. He currently owns four restaurants in addition to his Senior Systems Engineer – Federal Agencies Integration Lead position at Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC). At SNC, Christopher is responsible for licensing high-tech projects through the appropriate federal agencies. “Basically, I’m a translator of technical-speak to government-speak,” Christopher said. Jake is a Technical Intern at SNC, a position he had applied for as a sophomore and junior but had received rejections both times. He applied a third time after seeing Christopher’s profile in a newsletter from the Presidents Leadership Class, a leadership program at CU Boulder that both Scholars were (and are) involved in. Jake reached out to Christopher and they connected as Boettcher Scholars. “I knew the cloth Jake was cut from,” said Christopher. “The vetting had been done from other organizations.” As a Technical Intern, Jake has a plethora of different projects he’s working on. “My main focus right now is taking a high-level overview of a project – a whole life cycle – and breaking it down into individual steps,” Jake said. Christopher’s entrance to the company was not too different from Jake’s. He was actually at a Boettcher Finalist event when he made the connection to SNC. “I sat at a table of a prospective Scholar whose dad was a program manager at Sierra Nevada,” said Christopher. “I asked if he determined internships at SNC, and he said he was pretty integral.” After following up, Christopher was offered a job. Both Scholars are now working at their dream aerospace company – one that allows them to not only practice their skills but challenge them. “These projects haven’t existed before. My favorite aspect is the futuristic innovation – like having the technology to put humans on the moon,” Jake said, referencing SNC’s Lunar Lander project. “Every day is a new adventure,” added Christopher. “We have audacious goals and we’re always pushing the envelope. In the paradigm of regulation, there’s isn’t a script written on how you do this.” Outside of work, Jake enjoys hiking on Boulder’s many trails and playing tennis. He plans to graduate next year and potentially pursue a fifth-year master’s program. Christopher brews beer and wine and loves to cook. COVID-19 has put some plans on hold – including his now-rescheduled wedding – but with four restaurants to look after, Christopher is still plenty busy. Christopher and Jake offered some advice for Boettcher Scholars. “Take advantage of all the opportunities,” said Jake. “And be grateful for all that Boettcher gives you. Without Boettcher, many opportunities would have never been open to me.” “Don’t be afraid to take opportunities, but also learn to say ‘no,’” Christopher said. “We say ‘yes’ to everything as Boettcher Scholars. Know your limitations.” Both Scholars encourage others to be bold and reach out – just like they did....