Author: Boettcher Foundation

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Boettcher Scholar Year: 2015 Hometown: Colorado Springs College(s), Degree(s): University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, BS Biomedical Sciences, minors in Political Science and Biochemistry What are you currently interested in pursuing after graduating? I was around six years old when my mom first told me about how sick my grandmother, who lived in the Kurdistan, was, and how hard it was to find doctors who could help her. Conversations continued, and I realized that I wanted pursue medicine and become a doctor. This desire has been churning inside of me ever since — I have been one of the lucky few who have known what they want to do with their lives forever! I hope to apply to medical school after graduation with dreams of reforming global health. Tell us about what activities, groups, and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. From elementary throughout high school, I found myself in student council, so of course I had to join the Student Government Association at UCCS. I began as a justice and soon became the associate chief justice. This March, I was elected student body vice president. I see UCCS as a hub of opportunity – my hope is to push other students into that opportunity! Outside of UCCS, I spent the past two years working with Colorado Springs School District 11, passing a bond and mill levy. After much door-knocking, Colorado Springs said “yes,” and our schools received more public support. Tell us about an important mentor you have had. I have had the privilege of a wonderful relationship with my freshman chemistry lab instructor. I took honors chemistry for majors, an optional chemistry course designed with more rigor and was one of the few females in the course. My instructor, Tisha Mendiola-Jessop, is an avid critical thinker and excellent scientist and taught us to seek community in our endeavors. Tisha taught me how important it was to make strong relationships. She was the one who pushed me to apply for my Harvard research fellowship in the summer of 2017, and has since kept me as an assistant in her lab. What's the best advice you've ever received? I seek out advice from anyone I meet and I make a mental note of it, because I think the best way to learn is from others. The best piece of advice I have ever received, though, is a little tidbit I heard from a friend I made in Boston last summer. She told me that, amidst our incredibly busy lives, we need one day where we do not touch our work. Instead, we take that one day to ourselves; we write notes of gratitude and also write down any occurrence of a thought related to work. Essentially, “schedule balance in.” If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, who would you choose and why? If I could have dinner with anyone from history, I would choose Cleopatra. Cleopatra faced several barriers in her reign –  she was from a culture outside of the Egyptians, and she ruled a massive society and a male-dominated one at that. I would ask her for all her advice on leadership and diplomacy, and I would want to hear her perspective on our society and world today. I imagine it would be incredibly memorable....

By Paula Pulido Boettcher Student Scholar Committee. “Being here reminds me who I am and what I care about,” was the remark that rang true for all Boettcher Scholars and family that I spoke to this weekend. As a current Boettcher Scholar, I was excited to take advantage of the many opportunities the weekend offered. From connecting with old friends to forming new connections, the vision of the Boettcher Foundation to create more relationships and watch impact grow in Colorado is well under way! The event was nothing short of amazing. Opening night took place at Wynkoop Brewing Co. We heard about the future of the Boettcher Foundation from president and CEO Katie Kramer and members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board. For many 2018 Scholars in attendance, it was their first introduction into a community that is exciting, dynamic, and very welcoming. I was able to meet amazing mentors who spoke to me about their careers, relationships, and philosophies. They were genuinely interested and excited to hear about my career aspirations and give me all the advice they had. I was reminded of the uniqueness of the Boettcher community; Scholars are not competitive with one another and genuinely want to see one another succeed. The Signature Event continued the next morning at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. After breakfast, Scholars entered the auditorium to hear TED-style talks from Scholars including a psychiatrist, a voice actor, an elementary school teacher, a researcher, an idea incubator from New York City, and an education consultant. It was awe-inspiring to witness the far-reaching impact Scholars are making in the world. From advocating for mental illness, immigrant communities, and reminding us all about the child within us, Boettcher Scholars are touching countless lives all over the country. This is what it looks like to make your mark, bringing hope to the hopeless, bringing light and joy to a room of children and teaching those around you to become leaders. The talks were energizing and inspiring. The fun continued with my favorite part of the weekend: a wild and competitive game show with all the Scholars and their family members. On Sunday, there were multiple excursions to choose from. I couldn’t choose, so I signed up for two. In the morning, I went on a VIP tour of the Denver Broncos stadium. The energy was high as we got exclusive access onto the field, into the Broncos locker rooms, security rooms with top-of-the-line technology, and the most luxurious suites in the stadium. Later in the evening, I took a tour of downtown Denver and Union Station, learning all about the Boettcher family’s history and entrepreneurship in Colorado. I left the weekend with so much gratitude and renewed excitement to make my mark on this state, knowing that I am part of a team and legacy that is one of a kind! I can’t wait for the next signature event! ...

By Gergana Kostadinova Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board. The “Make Your Mark” presentations were remarkable! They covered a wide range of topics, and each speaker left the audience with an enduring lesson. The overarching message of the morning reminded me of the words of Howard Thurman: “Don’t ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive and then go do that. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.” To start the day, Craig Heacock, a 1985 Scholar, shared the cutting-edge research to return psychiatry to its shamanistic roots, specifically by using ketamine to treat depression and prevent suicides, and utilizing MDMA, better known as “ecstasy,” to treat post-traumatic stress disorder. Craig reminded us to never stop questioning what is possible. Beth Skelton, a 1984 Scholar, told a story from her time as an educator at an international school in Germany, when she discovered the importance of “leading from behind” and creating the social architecture to empower her students to create their own experiences. Veronica Fernandez Diaz, a 2015 Scholar, recounted how the Boettcher Foundation made her baggage of living as a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, recipient, easier to carry. She shared how she is constantly fighting to convince people of the humanity of her community, and challenged us to “Be Active. Do Something,” and stand up against injustice. Jeff Bauer, a 1965 Scholar, had a successful career as a health futurist and medical economist for nearly 50 years before he embarked on a second career as an artist. Jeff encouraged us to take on a new challenge at any age and to consider doing something totally unpredictable. The visual art he shared was fantastic! Mark Hess, a 1984 Scholar, on the other hand, tried to retire once and realized that there’s nothing else he’d rather do than be a teacher because he has observed invaluable lessons from his young students. Mark reminded us to follow the example of kids, who create genuine social connections because they’re not afraid to be vulnerable. Noha Kikhia, a 2013 Scholar, challenged us to rethink community development as a crucial shift towards social change that focuses on empowering people to enact change for themselves and those around them. This model is more effective than seeking to inspire leaders to be independent “changemakers.” Dee Bradley Baker, a 1981 Boettcher Scholar, shared his experiences as a voice actor and the beauty of bringing characters to life. A sampling of his many famous credits include Klaus from American Dad and Daffy Duck in Space Jam. Dee challenged us to embrace and comprehend those who are different with the same hospitality as fan conventions, and to remain flexible by welcoming our future with many voices. A special shout-out to Katy Craig, a 1995 Boettcher Scholar and the leadership coach and content developer for the Boettcher Foundation. She served as a flawless emcee and spent the past several months helping the speakers prepare. To conclude the morning, Lori Prok, chair of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board and 1992 Boettcher Scholar, encouraged the audience to make their mark with a quote from Audre Lorde: “When I dare to be powerful – to use my strength in the service of my vision –  then it becomes less and less important whether I am afraid.” ...

DENVER, July 17, 2018 — The Boettcher Foundation is pleased to announce the addition of three new staff members who will help the organization advance its mission of investing in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. Kathryn Evans has been hired as an executive assistant; Krystal Kappeler has been hired as the scholarship programming fellow; and Jackie Yelton has been hired as office coordinator. Kathryn Evans will support the Foundation’s executive leadership. She brings years of experience in the nonprofit arena. She previously supported leaders at Goodwill Industries and the executive director of a veteran community integration program. She attended Trident Technical College and recently relocated to Colorado from Charleston, S.C. Krystal Kappeler will oversee Alumni engagement and programming for the Boettcher Scholarship program. Krystal previously assisted with client events and financial operations at Welch Financial Planning and developed strategic marketing and contracts with Coca-Cola Refreshments. Krystal is a Boettcher Scholar and Colorado State University graduate. Jackie Yelton will serve as the Foundation’s first point of contact and will coordinate the inner-workings of the office. Prior to joining the foundation, Jackie worked in Uganda as an international program coordinator at the Foundation for Sustainable Development. Jackie grew up in Littleton and attended Brigham Young University – Idaho. “Kathryn, Krystal, and Jackie each bring unique talents and skills to the Foundation, and we are grateful that they have joined us in our work to create transformational impact in Colorado,” said Katie Kramer, the Foundation’s president and CEO. In addition to the new hires, the following Foundation staff members’ titles have been updated better reflect their contributions: Leslie Baldwin has been named grants manager; Katy Craig has been named leadership coach and content developer; Julie Lerudis has been named director of strategic initiatives and grantmaking; Stephanie Panion has been named scholarship program manager; and Garrett Mayberry has been named special projects coordinator. Contact: Kristi Arellano, 303.285.6208, kristi@boettcherfoundation.org About the Boettcher Foundation: At Boettcher, we believe in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. Every day we champion excellence across our state by investing in our most talented citizens and high-potential organizations, because supporting their hard work and leadership will enable them to give back for years to come....

Embracing adventure is a common theme of Brian Hall’s life and his career with the U.S. Department of State. A 2004 Boettcher Scholar from Custer County High School, Brian attended Colorado College, where he majored in economics and was involved in track, student government, and research. When plans to work at a financial planning nonprofit didn’t materialize after graduation, Brian took a mentor’s advice and moved to Nepal with only a 15-liter backpack and no guidebook. “It was the best advice,” Brian said. “I was totally dependent on making connections with people.” While teaching in a remote village, Brian started a recycling project, taught local students, and sponsored college scholarships for three aspiring Nepalese teachers. Grounded in serving others abroad, he successfully applied for the foreign service. “I knew about economics and how to engage with people, and I was completely honest about who I was in my interview. Being authentic took me where I needed to go.” Since entering the foreign service in 2009, Brian’s adventures have included living in Ecuador, Niger, Washington, D.C., and Kenya – all while starting a family. He currently works as a political officer at the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, but has worked on a range of projects from processing visa applications and advocating for U.S. businesses, to developing relationships with Kenyan academics and officials and helping with the recent high-level visit by the Secretary of State. Brian’s favorite aspect of his work is connecting with people and partnering their aspirations and U.S. interests. One such example is a young leader from Niger, who with the help of the U.S. Department of State, attended Harvard and recently established the first liberal arts college in his country. These connections help Brian appreciate the differences and “amazing similarities” he encounters in his daily life. “Rural Africa is remarkably similar to the rural America I experienced as a kid. People are nice, welcoming, and want to engage. But unlike the U.S., there’s no option for fast food.” Outside of work, Brian is committed to living out his service ethic. Though he moves posts every few years, Brian volunteers with youth, hosts informational programs for rural American students interested in international careers, and is a mentor with the Boettcher Foundation's mentorship program. He also aims to recruit more talented students like Boettcher Scholars to careers in international relations and government service. “Public service isn’t something that’s far away and only for a certain type of person. We need capable and service-minded Coloradans and people from all over the U.S. to serve.” On balancing service work and life, Brian shared a lesson he learned in college: “Always seek out service opportunities. But be very specific about what you do, and don’t try to do too much. Focus in on the places you can make a deep impact and real connection.” Brian’s career in the foreign service is extremely rewarding and full of connection, but also presents challenges. Brian and his wife are intentional about connecting their two children back to the U.S. and Colorado, as it can be challenging to develop a sense of home. His family is asked to uproot every few years, and they miss many weddings, funerals, and holidays. Yet in the face of such challenges, Brian’s optimism and service ethic keeps him and his family moving forward: “Always stay connected with the people you love and serve. They’ll remind you of the good that you’ve done and the positive experiences you’ve shared.” Brian is surprised by his life’s adventurous path, and experiences he would have never imagined. He is grateful for the Boettcher Foundation’s initial investment in his education and is  motivated by knowing that even though he lives outside of Colorado, he is paying forward that investment by serving his country in a meaningful way. “Be open to possibilities. Realize that Boettcher gave you the great gift of financial freedom. Look towards the world and see how your global connections can elevate those around you and even Colorado.”...

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Scholar Year: 2015 Hometown: Aurora College and degree(s): University of Colorado Boulder, BS 2019 What are you currently interested in pursuing after graduating? I currently study architectural engineering and plan to pursue a master’s degree in business analytics. I am also looking into PhD programs in architecture. I hope to use experience in engineering, business, and design to start my own sustainable design firm and consult on sustainable design projects. I strive to address pressing urban design challenges like overpopulation and global warming through strategic, community-centric development. Tell us about what activities, groups, and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. I entered CU as a transfer student from DU in 2016 with a new passion for architecture and urban planning. I moved into architectural engineering and wanted to make a difference in people’s lives worldwide. At CU, I now work as president for a sustainable international development team called Bridges to Prosperity that addresses poverty caused by rural isolation. We volunteer with communities in Bolivia and Swaziland to design and build bridges that connect people with education, markets, and health services. I love art and debate and found a way to work on these interests at CU for the Conference on World Affairs, which brings speakers to CU’s campus each spring for interdisciplinary panels that touch on pressing questions from every field. Tell us about an important mentor you have had. Professor Angela Thieman Dino has been a great mentor for me. Ang has pushed me to be my best. She has a spunky, fun-loving outlook on life that makes everyone feel excited to learn. This excitement and energy has helped me through some of the most challenging parts of my academic career and has taught me to face new difficulties with confidence. She becomes excited about each student’s work and supports everyone in striving toward their academic and personal goals. What's the best advice you've ever received? Two pieces of advice have really stuck with me. The first, I heard from another Boettcher Scholar: Syd Levy. He said that he “never misses an opportunity to shut up.” Many of my close friends come to me with questions or want to chat about new experiences that they are trying to think through. I really value that these friends confide in me. That trust can only be developed through honest listening, and when I pause and “take an opportunity to shut up” it gives people the chance to open up and share. Second, a professor at DU, Dr. Kate Willink told me “tears are holy water.” For me, the moments that bring me to tears are the moments of raw humanness. I feel alive when I cry tears of joy, or when I grieve. The moments when I feel so much emotion are powerful, and tears are my body’s honest response. This raw honesty is something to be appreciated, not to be repressed. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, who would you choose and why? Two visionary leaders come to mind. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Albert Einstein were both incredible thinkers that changed how people thought and felt. An evening with Einstein would be an opportunity to learn about how to think about things that have never been thought before. From his quotes and photos, Einstein seems like an optimistic, quirky, and happy person. For Martin Luther King, Jr., I would love to ask him about how he balanced the gravity of civil rights issues with being a husband and father. I can’t image balancing such public scrutiny with everyday life. His moral certainty and virtuous conviction that brought such unity seems so honorable in today’s polarized rhetoric. I aspire to make my values apparent in every action and word like Martin Luther King, Jr....

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Scholar Year: 1977 Hometown: Longmont College(s), Degree(s), Graduation Year(s): University of Denver, B.A. French Language & Literature, B.S. in Chemistry (1982), University of Phoenix, MBA Tell us about your current work and how long you’ve been doing it. What is your favorite aspect of your current occupation? Since 1997, I celebrate regularly with real estate clients as they grow their net worth and establish new homes for their families. I serve them when their child purchases her first home or when we sell their parents’ home or build their portfolio. Concurrently, I teach real estate classes to first-time home buyers, investors, and Realtors to empower them to make better choices through a deeper understanding of the market and best real estate practices. What role has being a Boettcher Scholar played into where you are and what you are doing now? This focus on empowering others is also reflected in my work as a business and life transition coach. My various activities today stem from an earlier, 13-year career teaching science to teens and demonstration skills to elementary teachers. I marvel how these opportunities all stem from undergraduate degrees in chemistry and French at the University of Denver! Without the Boettcher Scholarship, I would have had to attend CU Boulder part-time while working full-time. Who knows where that path would have led? Tell us about your involvement in activities, organizations, or groups outside of work. My first weekend at DU, I met Kent Owens, who would become my husband five years later. When our three kids were in their middle-school years, we homeschooled them. This experience knit our family together and developed a love of learning we share today. Now, with the kids grown, I am developing new areas of interest as an active Boettcher Ambassador, Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board member, Toastmaster, and rower. My family and I regularly cook, read, play games, learn about new things, and hike together. What’s the best advice you’ve received and what advice do you have for current graduates entering your career field? Any person who wants to have a positive impact on his own life needs to be curious, mindful, and intentional. For a busy “human doing,” such as a Boettcher Scholar, this time shifting focus is especially important. Meditation, especially being still, was not innate to me. Still, by developing the practice through years of good times and hard times, I’ve become better able to adjust, cope, and be resilient. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why? For a most memorable dinner, I would ask Jesus to dinner with friends, family, and me. This would probably have the most challenging and lasting impact on those present. It might not be as fun as having my favorite musician or as inspiring as hosting my most admired statesman. And it might not be as intellectually challenging as listening to a world-renowned professor or as heartwarming as bringing loved ones together. Our spiritual lives affect how we think, are, and act. Jesus got to the spiritual heart of the matter in his stories and often dined with people from all walks of life....

The Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board recently organized a variety of health and wellness events as a way of reconnecting while also encouraging healthy habits among the Boettcher community. Volunteer site coordinators organized events ranging from hiking to golf, and organizers reported that the events were a great opportunity to engage with the Boettcher community while burning some calories. Here’s a sample of some of their activities:   Western Slope - Hiking Five Boettcher Scholar Alumni living on the Western Slope met for a hike into the Colorado National Monument west of Grand Junction on April 7. They enjoyed the five-mile hike in beautiful weather and were treated to the a sighting of several desert bighorn sheep, including a ewe and her two lambs. The attendees included Mike Moran (1983), Cathy Bonan-Hamada (1982), Hope Waibel (1976), Kristin Donahue (1994), and Beth Skelton (1984). They also enjoyed the company of the mother of a current Boettcher Scholar, Harriet Carpenter, mother of Courtlyn Carpenter.     Fort Morgan - Golf A group of Boettcher Alumni and current Scholars hit the links on Saturday, April 28 for a health and wellness event. After playing nine holes at Fort Morgan’s Quail Dunes Golf Course, they got together for a fun happy hour to cool down, catch up, and network. The group consisted of Will Helling (2012), Austin Herman (2017), Brad Johnson (2017), Charlie Johnson (2010), Kaitlin Johnson (2009), Megan Neumann (2011), and Trey Thompson (2011).   Phoenix - Night Hike A group of Boettcher Scholar alumni met at White Tanks Regional Park near Phoenix, Arizona for a sunset hike that included after-dark scorpion spotting. Tracy Wahl (1986), Keli Price (1976), and Pam and Martin Turman (1975) attended this fun outing on April 28.     Denver - Mindfulness Under the guidance of alumni board member Beth Baker Owens (1977), several Boettcher Alumni and current Scholars learned about the importance of living a centered lifestyle, and discovered how mindfulness can positively impact their lives. Our DU scholars even set intentions to integrate mindfulness into their education and community engagement routines, including educating their own students about chakra scanning and sitting meditation.   Golden - Hiking Boettcher ScholarAalumni from the Denver Metro area gathered at South Table Mountain Park on April 29 for a hike among flowering wild plums and cliff faces above the City of Golden. Jennifer Meyers (1991), Mallory Bustow (2004), Tanner McManus (2011), and Garrett Mayberry (2011) were joined by Mallory’s husband, Aaron, and Jennifer’s daughter, Maya. They enjoyed Tanner’s drone photography and an after-hike lunch in Golden. ...

Saturday, June 23, 8:30 - 11:45 a.m. Denver Museum of Nature and Science Seven diverse alumni speakers will inspire you to explore your leadership, your purpose, and unique and surprising ways in which you can make your mark. Craig Heacock — The Psychedelic Revolution in Psychiatry Psychedelics are back and they are changing the way we treat mental illness. Psychiatric drugs typically dial down symptoms without changing the substrate of the illness-- these new psychedelic tools can offer the promise of transformation and even cure. Beth Skelton — Stumbling Into a New Leadership Style: Leading from Behind After Beth Skelton was scheduled to lead a class field trip to London, her co-leader, who knew London well, backed out of the trip just four weeks before departure. Beth had to create the conditions for the students to take a much more active role in the trip by empowering the students to take ownership and initiative. In the process, she fell into a new leadership style: leading from behind. Jeff Bauer — Creating a Difference: Career Transition from Health Care to Art and Music Knowing he could never quit working (retire), but tiring of the work he did for almost 50 years, 1965 scholar Jeff Bauer describes his purposeful transition from widely recognized health care expert to unknown artist and how the principles of creativity can help plan a major transition, at any stage of life. Veronica Fernandez-Diaz — Sin papeles. Sin Miedo. Sin papeles. Sin Miedo. Without papers. Without fear. Veronica, a 2015 scholar, shares the process of losing and finding herself alongside her undocumented familia, and how finding her own way of resistance motivates her life as a leader and advocate.  Mark Hess — If You Are a Lost Parent, Please Meet Your Child at the Service Desk at the Front of the Store Have you lost your child? No, not that one . . . the one inside of you. Have you kept the door open to the joy of being a kid, of living your passions, of following your heart? As a teacher of gifted children, Mark sees you — the Boettcher Scholar and the gifted adult — in his classroom and on the playground every day. Let's remember what it is like to play. Noha Kikhia - Why the World Doesn't Need More Changemakers In an increasingly connected world, we are more aware of social problems and their impact on communities across the world. Changemakers — individuals hellbent to solving those problems — have emerged and claim to be identifying new ways to solve these age-old problems. Yet aspiring to be a changemaker is not necessarily the best way to "make your mark." Dee Bradley Baker - Fan Conventions and the Human Need to Make the Fantastical Real Humans are creatures that love to create narratives, stories, and mythologies that reach beyond our mundane existence. Through conventions, we can participate and live in them. The inclusive and collaboratively creative spirit of fan conventions points to a better world, and is a model for how we as humans should be directing much more of our time. Get your pass to all Signature Event activities here! This event is open to current and Alumni Scholars, significant others, and adult family members....

Margaret Myers, a 1968 Boettcher Scholar from Denver South High School, worked her way up the ranks of the U.S. Army, ultimately retiring from the Army Reserve as a colonel. Now the director of the Institute for Defense Analyses Information Technology and Systems Division, Margaret is no stranger to high-profile jobs. She’s also no stranger to being one of only a few women in a male-dominated industry. “I had several jobs where I was the only woman in the room,” Margaret said, describing it as being one of the biggest challenges of her career. “I learned that you have to do your homework and be prepared so that when you do have the opportunity to speak up, you know what you’re talking about and people realize what you have to offer.” That’s why Margaret has made it a point to look out for other women — and men — in her career. “When one wins, we all win,” Margaret said. But when she followed her husband to Fort Bragg and joined the military in the seventies, there were very few women to look out for her. Despite this, Margaret served on active duty in the military, was a director in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence (C3I) and acted as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for C3I Acquisition. Margaret is the recipient of three Presidential Rank Awards, as well as the Defense Department Distinguished Civilian Service Award and is a Volgenau School of Engineering Distinguished Alumni from George Mason University. Although she has made many career moves and received numerous accolades since, Margaret is grateful for having received the Boettcher Scholarship, which allowed her to attend Colorado College. “I decided early on in my senior year of high school that I wanted to go to CC, but it was too expensive. I didn’t even apply until after I found out I had received a Boettcher Scholarship,” she recalled. Margaret credits CC with exposing her to a liberal arts education, even though she was a math major, and giving her critical thinking skills that she has continued to use ever since. Her college education as well as the early years in her career taught Margaret to take risks — something she now encourages others to do, especially women. “When you want something, it’s always worth asking,” she advised. “Get over the fear and intimidation and think ‘why not? All they can say is no.’” This advice has proved effective in her own life and career. When she was a new second lieutenant, Margaret really wanted to do a different job than the one she had been assigned. So, she asked the colonel. He was impressed with her courage, and ultimately, Margaret got to do the job she wanted, which has led her to each subsequent job. In her current role, Margaret focuses on cybersecurity and other cyberspace challenges of national and global significance. When she’s not working, Margaret likes to travel to Colorado to ski. “A few years ago, I realized that wherever you go, you should always be a good ambassador for Colorado,” Margaret said. “Even though I no longer live in the state, I try to be a good ambassador.”...