Author: Boettcher Foundation

When Richard Leggett explored future careers in middle school, he was pointed to three options: chemist, applied mathematician and minister. However, the 1971 Boettcher Scholar from Colorado Springs had no doubts about which vocation he would chose: “I always knew that I was called to be a priest.” Five decades later, Richard is living out his calling as the recently appointed vicar of Holy Trinity Cathedral, an Anglican parish in New Westminster, British Columbia. In his role, Richard serves the spiritual needs of an urban, blue-collar congregation in one of Canada’s most secular and progressive communities. “My work is help answer how our faith community can live in the 21st century and translate the gospel into new ways,” Richard said. “How can we be leaven in the loaf of this downtown neighborhood?” One of the ways Richard is answering this question is through a large-scale development on the cathedral’s property, which is in the heart of the New Westminster’s historic center. Richard is working closely with the neighborhood to guide the construction of a 30-story residential tower that includes 42 units of affordable housing, a community plaza, and new parish offices and meetings spaces with commercial-grade community kitchen. The goal is to “reinvent the spaces and the conversations where we engage our neighbors.” About his challenging task of guiding the development, Richard joked “No one taught this type of work in theological studies.” However, Richard is thankful for the life experiences that prepared him to lead this creative undertaking. After graduating from the University of Denver with a bachelor’s degree in French, German and secondary education, Richard took various jobs in retail and teaching foreign languages before being ordained in 1981 and serving in Denver for three years. In 1987, he received his master’s in liturgical studies from Notre Dame and moved to Vancouver with his wife, son and two cats for what he anticipated would be a three-year teaching position. While at Vancouver School of Theology, Richard completed his doctorate and helped to develop the first accredited master’s in divinity program in North America for people serving in indigenous communities. This work opened doors for Richard to travel to other parts of the world to develop and teach “dynamic cultural translations” that resonated with laity and clergy in diverse cultures. After 23 years teaching, Richard chose to return to congregational ministry as a rector at a church in Vancouver. Before accepting the appointment to Holy Trinity in 2018, he had also served as member of the staff of the Anglican Church of Canada and a national committee member. Looking back on his path, Richard is amazed by the opportunities he has had to advance his own education and to faithfully and creatively engage with modern culture. He’s also never forgotten the gift of the Boettcher Scholarship, whose plaque he has displayed in every one of his offices for more than three decades. “The Boettcher Scholarship was a tremendous gift of the generosity of the foundation and family. If not for the scholarship, I don’t know what we would have done. The scholarship was the foundation for my success as a graduate student and the springboard for my career.” Richard noted that being a Boettcher Scholar impressed upon him a noblesse oblige, a responsibility to pay forward the gift he had received. The scholarship is also a reminder of the gratitude and joy he has found in following his vocation. “Remember that all that you are, and all that you have, is a gift. Living in gratitude means we live and respond in ways that build up other people and ourselves. Joy stems from this – the deep-seated conviction that you are doing and being who you are called to be. This is your purpose.”...

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Boettcher Scholar Year: 2000 Hometown: Greeley Colleges/Degree(s): University of Denver: BA Spanish and International Studies; MA International Administration Tell us about your current work and how long you’ve been doing it. What is your favorite aspect of your current occupation? I've worked at Rise Above Colorado for the past two and a half years. Our nonprofit works across the state, directly with youth and with the adults who serve them, to empower young people with education and inspiration to prevent youth substance misuse. The best part of my role is the ability to connect people across the state and leverage the resources and expertise that exist in local communities. I also have the amazing privilege to innovate and create alongside our youth partners, which helps me feel motivated to always live up to their high expectations! What role has being a Boettcher Scholar played into where you are and what you are doing now? I’m forever grateful for the chain of events sparked by the Boettcher Scholarship that has led me to where I am today. Apart from a year in South India working at a local NGO after graduate school, I've been in Colorado-based work ever since. When I returned from India, I had the fortune to meet a trustee of the foundation who hired me onto the Community Initiatives team at a local bank. Five years later, I joined the State of Colorado, directing a grant program to fund youth prevention work. That position led me to Rise Above Colorado. Through these diverse opportunities to serve Colorado, my love for this state has continued to grow. Tell us about your involvement in activities, organizations, or groups outside of work. I like to joke about my ongoing extracurricular activities as an adult. For many years, I’ve played on a USTA tennis league in Denver, building a wonderful community of teammates and friends. And I also have been a member of the Cherry Creek Chorale, going on nine years now. I’ve dabbled in various other activities over the years (including a summer kickball league) and have volunteered at various youth-serving programs in the Denver metro area, including serving on the board of directors for Groundwork Denver and volunteering at Mi Casa Resource Center for Women and Urban Peak’s youth homeless shelter. What’s the best advice you’ve received and what advice do you have for current graduates entering your career field? When I entered the workforce, I was idealistic and adamant that the work I would do mattered more than anything else in selecting my first job. An advisor told me to be selective about the people I worked with as well as the nature of the job. Over the years, I’ve come to appreciate her wisdom. We spend so much of our time and energy with our work colleagues, and our capacity to impact change is often influenced by them. So, I would advise new graduates, as I was, to surround yourself with people who will positively challenge and inspire you. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why? My maternal grandmother died when my mother was a young child, but her legacy has greatly impacted my life. I’ve heard so many stories about her and have even been compared to her at times. I would love to meet her to know who she was, and what her hopes and dreams for her family were. If my great-grandmother could be there, whom I did have the fortune to meet and know, I’d invite her for dinner too. And it would be awesome if they cooked for me!...

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Boettcher Scholar Year: 2016 Hometown: Mexico City, Mexico College(s), Degree(s): University of Colorado Boulder. Double-majoring in aerospace engineering and applied mathematics. Anticipated graduation 2021. What are you currently interested in pursuing after graduating? I hope to be working for a local aerospace engineering company, redefining boundaries for humans in space as well as spaceflight technology. Furthermore, I want to continue working toward getting my pilot’s license. With these efforts, I will be one step closer to achieving my dream of becoming an astronaut. Tell us about what activities, groups and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. I have always sought to find like-minded individuals as friends, as well as those whose views may challenge mine. I value diversity in all areas of my life. Thus, I decided to join Tau Psi Omega, a multicultural fraternity. These gentlemen embody the diverse perspectives that I was seeking in a group of friends. Some of these young men also encouraged me to join the CU Boulder Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, where it is our mission to empower engineers of Hispanic descent. These opportunities have opened many doors for newfound friendships and passions. Tell us about an important mentor you have had. Dr. Lucas Monzon, my professor for Calculus III for Engineers, inspires me to actively seek knowledge, rather than passively receiving my education. Lucas has opened doors for me including recommending me to my current position at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics where I analyze solar data from the SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) satellite. Lucas has also become a great friend. We enjoyed watching the FIFA Soccer World Cup games this summer; me rooting for his home team, Argentina, and him rooting for my beloved Mexico. I view Lucas as my greatest mentor because we share common interests, passions and the curiosity to keep learning.  What's the best advice you've ever received? So much of college is a blur. You take the courses each semester, struggle and triumph, work and learn. It is far too easy to get caught up in what is next and new. Yet, these moments are memories in the making. I have found the best way to step back is to just simply take a deep breath and appreciate where you are in each moment. Turning your attention inwards beneath all of the responsibilities and stresses, you are alive. This is the greatest gift of all. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, who would you choose and why? One of my favorite bands has always been Coldplay. Their iconic piano intro from “Clocks” still sends chills through my body when I hear it. However, their new music is complete garbage in comparison to their older music. Coldplay is dead to me. So if I could have dinner with a few people from history, it would be this group. They may (technically) still be alive and well, but they are ancient history to me. Perhaps if they created quality music again, I would not have to put these artists as a group from history I’d dine with....

To wrap up the festivities of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board’s Signature Event, attendees had the opportunity to join one of six different excursions on Sunday. From a behind-the-scenes tour of Mile High Stadium, to a wildflower hike on Mt. Goliath, to a bike-and-brew tour in of Denver’s trendy River North Arts District, there certainly was something for everyone.   Wildflower Nature Hike  What a difference a day (and a few thousand feet of elevation gain...

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Name: Theo Chapman Boettcher Scholar Year: 2003 Hometown: Aurora College(s), Degree(s): University of Denver, Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering, Master of Business Administration Tell us about your current work and how long you’ve been doing it. What is your favorite aspect of your current occupation? I have been a proposal engineer at Custom Instrumentation Services Corp. (CiSCO) since March of 2016. We provide the equipment and software necessary for power plants, refineries and other operations to monitor and report their emissions data to the EPA. My favorite aspect of my job is that no project is ever identical to another –  some are relatively simple while others are complex. This has also been the first job of my career where the focus is on business development as compared to design and construction.   What role has being a Boettcher Scholar played into where you are and what you are doing now? Being a Denver native and spending most of my career in Colorado, everyone recognizes the Boettcher name. For me, I take it as a personal challenge to live up to that name each day by working hard, giving back, cultivating new relationships, learning as much as possible in a variety of realms and disciplines, welcoming constructive criticism to be better and doing my best to make a positive impact in my organizations and surrounding community.   Tell us about your involvement in activities, organizations, or groups outside of work. I am a Boettcher Foundation Alumni Ambassador, a Young Aspiring Americans for Social and Political Activism (YAASPA) board member, the Black Alumni Association president at the University of Denver as well as an active alumnus of the Pioneer Leadership Program and the Ritchie School of Engineering and Computer Science. I am also a graduate and alumni advisory committee member of the Urban Leadership Foundation of Colorado Chamber Connect program, as well as an alumnus of the New Leaders Council Fellowship. I look forward to future work with the Daniels College of Business advisory board and reconnecting with the Colorado Association of Black Professional Engineers and Scientists (CABPES).   What’s the best advice you’ve received and what advice do you have for current graduates entering your career field? Never stop asking questions. The more you develop and learn, the more you realize just how much you don't know, which will keep you humble and hungry for new knowledge. Network with the intention of doing something for someone else instead of looking for what they can do for you. Also, network with everyone, from your fellow engineers to the accountants to human resources to the CEO to the custodians. Everybody has an important role, and if you take any of those roles away, the organization does not function properly. Show respect to everyone. Period.   If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why? I would have dinner with my family members who are no longer here – grandparents, godparents, aunts, uncles, cousins, friends, teachers and mentors – so that I can be reminded of advice that has been forgotten, gain new advice to share with others, reminisce on the memories we had, laugh until it hurts and earn their ultimate stamp of approval on whether or not I'm doing a good job in this game called life....

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Boettcher Scholar Year: 2015 Hometown: Colorado Springs College(s), Degree(s): University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, BS Biomedical Sciences, minors in Political Science and Biochemistry What are you currently interested in pursuing after graduating? I was around six years old when my mom first told me about how sick my grandmother, who lived in the Kurdistan, was, and how hard it was to find doctors who could help her. Conversations continued, and I realized that I wanted pursue medicine and become a doctor. This desire has been churning inside of me ever since - I have been one of the lucky few who have known what they want to do with their lives forever! I hope to apply to medical school after graduation with dreams of reforming global health. Tell us about what activities, groups and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. From elementary throughout high school, I found myself in student council, so of course I had to join the Student Government Association at UCCS. I began as a justice and soon became the associate chief justice. This March, I was elected student body vice president. I see UCCS as a hub of opportunity –  my hope is to push other students into that opportunity! Outside of UCCS, I spent the past two years working with Colorado Springs School District 11, passing a bond and mill levy. After much door-knocking, Colorado Springs said “yes,” and our schools received more public support. Tell us about an important mentor you have had. I have had the privilege of a wonderful relationship with my freshman chemistry lab instructor. I took honors chemistry for majors, an optional chemistry course designed with more rigor and was one of the few females in the course. My instructor, Tisha Mendiola-Jessop, is an avid critical thinker and excellent scientist and taught us to seek community in our endeavors. Tisha taught me how important it was to make strong relationships. She was the one who pushed me to apply for my Harvard research fellowship in the summer of 2017, and has since kept me as an assistant in her lab. What's the best advice you've ever received? I seek out advice from anyone I meet and I make a mental note of it, because I think the best way to learn is from others. The best piece of advice I have ever received, though, is a little tidbit I heard from a friend I made in Boston last summer. She told me that, amidst our incredibly busy lives, we need one day where we do not touch our work. Instead, we take that one day to ourselves; we write notes of gratitude and also write down any occurrence of a thought related to work. Essentially, “schedule balance in.” If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, who would you choose and why? If I could have dinner with anyone from history, I would choose Cleopatra. Cleopatra faced several barriers in her reign –  she was from a culture outside of the Egyptians, and she ruled a massive society and a male-dominated one at that. I would ask her for all her advice on leadership and diplomacy, and I would want to hear her perspective on our society and world today. I imagine it would be incredibly memorable....

By Paula Pulido Boettcher Student Scholar Committee. “Being here reminds me who I am and what I care about.” was the remark that rang true for all Boettcher scholars and family that I spoke to this weekend. As a current Boettcher Scholar, I was excited to take advantage of the many opportunities the weekend offered. From connecting with old friends to forming new connections, the vision of the Boettcher Foundation to create more relationships and watch impact grow in Colorado is well under way! The event was nothing short of amazing. Opening night took place at Wynkoop Brewing Co. We heard about the future of the Boettcher Foundation from president and CEO Katie Kramer and members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board. For many 2018 scholars in attendance, it was their first introduction into a community that is exciting, dynamic and very welcoming. I was able to meet amazing mentors who spoke to me about their careers, relationships and philosophies. They were genuinely interested and excited to hear about my career aspirations and give me all the advice they had. I was reminded of the uniqueness of the Boettcher community; scholars are not competitive with one another and genuinely want to see one another succeed. The Signature Event continued the next morning at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. After breakfast, scholars entered the auditorium to hear TED-style talks from scholars including a psychiatrist, a voice actor, an elementary school teacher, a researcher and idea incubator from New York City and an education consultant. It was awe-inspiring to witness the far-reaching impact scholars are making in the world. From advocating for mental illness, immigrant communities and reminding us all about the child within us, Boettcher Scholars are touching countless lives all over the country. This is what it looks like to make your mark, bringing hope to the hopeless, bringing light and joy to a room of children and teaching those around you to become leaders. The talks were energizing and inspiring. The fun continued with my favorite part of the weekend: a wild and competitive game show with all the scholars and their family members. On Sunday, there were multiple excursions to choose from. I couldn’t choose, so I signed up for two. In the morning, I went on a VIP tour of the Denver Broncos stadium. The energy was high as we got exclusive access onto the field, into the Broncos locker rooms, security rooms with top-of-the-line technology and the most luxurious suites in the stadium. Later in the evening, I took a tour of downtown Denver and Union Station, learning all about the Boettcher family’s history and entrepreneurship in Colorado. I left the weekend with so much gratitude and renewed excitement to make my mark on this state, knowing that I am part of a team and legacy that is one of a kind! I can’t wait for the next signature event! ...

By Gergana Kostadinova Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board. The “Make Your Mark” presentations were remarkable! They covered a wide range of topics, and each speaker left the audience with an enduring lesson. The overarching message of the morning reminded me of the words of Howard Thurman: “Don’t ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive and then go do that. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.” To start the day, Craig Heacock, a 1985 scholar, shared the cutting-edge research to return psychiatry to its shamanistic roots, specifically by using ketamine to treat depression and prevent suicides, and utilizing MDMA, better known as “ecstasy,” to treat post-traumatic stress disorder. Craig reminded us to never stop questioning what is possible. Beth Skelton, a 1984 scholar, told a story from her time as an educator at an international school in Germany, when she discovered the importance of “leading from behind” and creating the social architecture to empower her students to create their own experiences. Veronica Fernandez Diaz, a 2015 scholar, recounted how the Boettcher Foundation made her baggage of living as a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, recipient, easier to carry. She shared how she is constantly fighting to convince people of the humanity of her community, and challenged us to “Be Active. Do Something,” and stand up against injustice. Jeff Bauer, a 1965 scholar, had a successful career as a health futurist and medical economist for nearly 50 years before he embarked on a second career as an artist. Jeff encouraged us to take on a new challenge at any age and to consider doing something totally unpredictable. The visual art he shared was fantastic! Mark Hess, a 1984 scholar, on the other hand, tried to retire once and realized that there’s nothing else he’d rather do than be a teacher because he has observed invaluable lessons from his young students. Mark reminded us to follow the example of kids, who create genuine social connections because they’re not afraid to be vulnerable. Noha Kikhia, a 2013 scholar, challenged us to rethink community development as a crucial shift towards social change that focuses on empowering people to enact change for themselves and those around them. This model is more effective than seeking to inspire leaders to be independent “changemakers.” Dee Bradley Baker, a 1981 Boettcher Scholar, shared his experiences as a voice actor and the beauty of bringing characters to life. A sampling of his many famous credits include Klaus from American Dad and Daffy Duck in Space Jam. Dee challenged us to embrace and comprehend those who are different with the same hospitality as fan conventions, and to remain flexible by welcoming our future with many voices. A special shout-out to Katy Craig, a 1995 Boettcher Scholar and the leadership coach and content developer for the Boettcher Foundation. She served as a flawless emcee and spent the past several months helping the speakers prepare. To conclude the morning, Lori Prok, chair of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board and 1992 Boettcher Scholar, encouraged the audience to make their mark with a quote from Audre Lorde: “When I dare to be powerful – to use my strength in the service of my vision –  then it becomes less and less important whether I am afraid.” ...

DENVER, July 17, 2018 — The Boettcher Foundation is pleased to announce the addition of three new staff members who will help the organization advance its mission of investing in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. Kathryn Evans has been hired as an executive assistant; Krystal Kappeler has been hired as the scholarship programming fellow; and Jackie Yelton has been hired as office coordinator. Kathryn Evans will support the foundation’s executive leadership. She brings years of experience in the nonprofit arena. She previously supported leaders at Goodwill Industries and the executive director of a veteran community integration program. She attended Trident Technical College and recently relocated to Colorado from Charleston, S.C. Krystal Kappeler will oversee alumni engagement and programming for the Boettcher Scholarship program. Krystal previously assisted with client events and financial operations at Welch Financial Planning and developed strategic marketing and contracts with Coca-Cola Refreshments. Krystal is a Boettcher Scholar and Colorado State University graduate. Jackie Yelton will serve as the foundation’s first point of contact and will coordinate the inner-workings of the office. Prior to joining the foundation, Jackie worked in Uganda as an international program coordinator at the Foundation for Sustainable Development. Jackie grew up in Littleton and attended Brigham Young University – Idaho. “Kathryn, Krystal and Jackie each bring unique talents and skills to the foundation, and we are grateful that they have joined us in our work to create transformational impact in Colorado,” said Katie Kramer, the foundation’s president and CEO. In addition to the new hires, the following foundation staff members’ titles have been updated better reflect their contributions: Leslie Baldwin has been named grants manager; Katy Craig has been named leadership coach and content developer; Julie Lerudis has been named director of strategic initiatives and grantmaking; Stephanie Panion has been named scholarship program manager; and Garrett Mayberry has been named special projects coordinator. Contact: Kristi Arellano, 303.285.6208, kristi@boettcherfoundation.org About the Boettcher Foundation: At Boettcher, we believe in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. Every day we champion excellence across our state by investing in our most talented citizens and high-potential organizations, because supporting their hard work and leadership will enable them to give back for years to come....

Embracing adventure is a common theme of Brian Hall’s life and his career with the U.S. Department of State. A 2004 Boettcher Scholar from Custer County High School, Brian attended Colorado College, where he majored in economics and was involved in track, student government and research. When plans to work at a financial planning nonprofit didn’t materialize after graduation, Brian took a mentor’s advice and moved to Nepal with only a 15-liter backpack and no guidebook. “It was the best advice,” Brian said. “I was totally dependent on making connections with people.” While teaching in a remote village, Brian started a recycling project, taught local students, and sponsored college scholarships for three aspiring Nepalese teachers. Grounded in serving others abroad, he successfully applied for the foreign service. “I knew about economics and how to engage with people, and I was completely honest about who I was in my interview. Being authentic took me where I needed to go.” Since entering the foreign service in 2009, Brian’s adventures have included living in Ecuador, Niger, Washington, D.C. and Kenya – all while starting a family. He currently works as a political officer at the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, but has worked on a range of projects from processing visa applications and advocating for U.S. businesses, to developing relationships with Kenyan academics and officials and helping with the recent high-level visit by the Secretary of State. Brian’s favorite aspect of his work is connecting with people and partnering their aspirations and U.S. interests. One such example is a young leader from Niger, who with the help of the U.S. Department of State, attended Harvard and recently established the first liberal arts college in his country. These connections help Brian appreciate the differences and “amazing similarities” he encounters in his daily life. “Rural Africa is remarkably similar to the rural America I experienced as a kid. People are nice, welcoming and want to engage. But unlike the U.S., there’s no option for fast food.” Outside of work, Brian is committed to living out his service ethic. Though he moves posts every few years, Brian volunteers with youth, hosts informational programs for rural American students interested in international careers and is a mentor with the Boettcher Foundation's mentorship program. He also aims to recruit more talented students like Boettcher Scholars to careers in international relations and government service. “Public service isn’t something that’s far away and only for a certain type of person. We need capable and service-minded Coloradans and people from all over the U.S. to serve.” On balancing service work and life, Brian shared a lesson he learned in college: “Always seek out service opportunities. But be very specific about what you do, and don’t try to do too much. Focus in on the places you can make a deep impact and real connection.” Brian’s career in the foreign service is extremely rewarding and full of connection, but also presents challenges. Brian and his wife are intentional about connecting their two children back to the U.S. and Colorado, as it can be challenging to develop a sense of home. His family is asked to uproot every few years, and they miss many weddings, funerals and holidays. Yet in the face of such challenges, Brian’s optimism and service ethic keeps him and his family moving forward: “Always stay connected with the people you love and serve. They’ll remind you of the good that you’ve done and the positive experiences you’ve shared.” Brian is surprised by his life’s adventurous path, and experiences he would have never imagined. He is grateful for the Boettcher Foundation’s initial investment in his education and is  motivated by knowing that even though he lives outside of Colorado, he is paying forward that investment by serving his country in a meaningful way. “Be open to possibilities. Realize that Boettcher gave you the great gift of financial freedom. Look towards the world and see how your global connections can elevate those around you and even Colorado.”...