Author: Boettcher Foundation

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Name: Michael Anthony Scholar Year: 2015 Hometown: Aurora College and degree(s): University of Colorado Boulder, BS 2019 What are you currently interested in pursuing after graduating? I currently study architectural engineering and plan to pursue a master’s degree in business analytics. I am also looking into PhD programs in architecture. I hope to use experience in engineering, business and design to start my own sustainable design firm and consult on sustainable design projects. I strive to address pressing urban design challenges like overpopulation and global warming through strategic, community-centric development. Tell us about what activities, groups and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. I entered CU as a transfer student from DU in 2016 with a new passion for architecture and urban planning. I moved into architectural engineering and wanted to make a difference in people’s lives worldwide. At CU, I now work as president for a sustainable international development team called Bridges to Prosperity that addresses poverty caused by rural isolation. We volunteer with communities in Bolivia and Swaziland to design and build bridges that connect people with education, markets and health services. I love art and debate and found a way to work on these interests at CU for the Conference on World Affairs, which brings speakers to CU’s campus each spring for interdisciplinary panels that touch on pressing questions from every field. Tell us about an important mentor you have had. Professor Angela Thieman Dino has been a great mentor for me. Ang has pushed me to be my best. She has a spunky, fun-loving outlook on life that makes everyone feel excited to learn. This excitement and energy has helped me through some of the most challenging parts of my academic career and has taught me to face new difficulties with confidence. She becomes excited about each student’s work and supports everyone in striving toward their academic and personal goals. What's the best advice you've ever received? Two pieces of advice have really stuck with me. The first, I heard from another Boettcher Scholar: Syd Levy. He said that he “never misses an opportunity to shut up.” Many of my close friends come to me with questions or want to chat about new experiences that they are trying to think through. I really value that these friends confide in me. That trust can only be developed through honest listening, and when I pause and “take an opportunity to shut up” it gives people the chance to open up and share. Second, a professor at DU, Dr. Kate Willink told me “tears are holy water.” For me, the moments that bring me to tears are the moments of raw humanness. I feel alive when I cry tears of joy, or when I grieve. The moments when I feel so much emotion are powerful, and tears are my body’s honest response. This raw honesty is something to be appreciated, not to be repressed. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, who would you choose and why? Two visionary leaders come to mind. Martin Luther King and Albert Einstein were both incredible thinkers that changed how people thought and felt. An evening with Einstein would be an opportunity to learn about how to think about things that have never been thought before. From his quotes and photos, Einstein seems like an optimistic, quirky and happy person. For Martin Luther King, Jr., I would love to ask him about how he balanced the gravity of civil rights issues with being a husband and father. I can’t image balancing such public scrutiny with everyday life. His moral certainty and virtuous conviction that brought such unity seems so honorable in today’s polarized rhetoric. I aspire to make my values apparent in every action and word like Martin Luther King, Jr....

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Name: Beth Baker Owens Scholar Year: 1977 Hometown: Longmont College(s), Degree(s), Graduation Year(s): University of Denver, B.A. French Language & Literature, B.S. in Chemistry (1982), University of Phoenix, MBA Tell us about your current work and how long you’ve been doing it. What is your favorite aspect of your current occupation? Since 1997, I celebrate regularly with real estate clients as they grow their net worth and establish new homes for their families. I serve them when their child purchases her first home or when we sell their parents’ home or build their portfolio. Concurrently, I teach real estate classes to first-time home buyers, investors and Realtors to empower them to make better choices through a deeper understanding of the market and best real estate practices. What role has being a Boettcher Scholar played into where you are and what you are doing now? This focus on empowering others is also reflected in my work as a business and life transition coach. My various activities today stem from an earlier, 13-year career teaching science to teens and demonstration skills to elementary teachers. I marvel how these opportunities all stem from undergraduate degrees in chemistry and French at the University of Denver! Without the Boettcher Scholarship, I would have had to attend CU Boulder part-time while working full-time. Who knows where that path would have led? Tell us about your involvement in activities, organizations, or groups outside of work. My first weekend at DU, I met Kent Owens, who would become my husband five years later. When our three kids were in their middle-school years, we homeschooled them. This experience knit our family together and developed a love of learning we share today. Now, with the kids grown, I am developing new areas of interest as an active Boettcher Ambassador, Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board member, Toastmaster and rower. My family and I regularly cook, read, play games, learn about new things and hike together. What’s the best advice you’ve received and what advice do you have for current graduates entering your career field? Any person who wants to have a positive impact on his own life needs to be curious, mindful and intentional. For a busy “human doing,” such as a Boettcher Scholar, this time shifting focus is especially important. Meditation, especially being still, was not innate to me. Still, by developing the practice through years of good times and hard times, I’ve become better able to adjust, cope and be resilient. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why? For a most memorable dinner, I would ask Jesus to dinner with friends, family and me. This would probably have the most challenging and lasting impact on those present. It might not be as fun as having my favorite musician or as inspiring as hosting my most admired statesman. And it might not be as intellectually challenging as listening to a world-renowned professor or as heartwarming as bringing loved ones together. Our spiritual lives affect how we think, are and act. Jesus got to the spiritual heart of the matter in his stories and often dined with people from all walks of life....

The Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board recently organized a variety of health and wellness events as a way of reconnecting while also encouraging healthy habits among the Boettcher community. Volunteer site coordinators organized events ranging from hiking to golf, and organizers reported that the events were a great opportunity to engage with the Boettcher community while burning some calories. Here’s a sample of some of their activities:   Western Slope - Hiking Five Boettcher Scholar alumni living on the Western Slope met for a hike into the Colorado National Monument  west of Grand Junction on April 7. They enjoyed the five-mile hike in beautiful weather and were treated to the a sighting of several desert bighorn sheep, including a ewe and her two lambs. The attendees included Mike Moran (1983), Cathy Bonan-Hamada (1982), Hope Waibel (1976), Kristin Donahue (1994) and Beth Skelton (1984). They also enjoyed the company of the mother of a current Boettcher Scholar, Harriet Carpenter, mother of Courtlyn Carpenter.     Fort Morgan - Golf A group of Boettcher alumni and current scholars hit the links on Saturday, April 28 for a health and wellness event. After playing nine holes at Fort Morgan’s Quail Dunes Golf Course, they got together for a fun happy hour to cool down, catch up and network. The group consisted of Will Helling (2012), Austin Herman (2017), Brad Johnson (2017), Charlie Johnson (2010), Kaitlin Johnson (2009), Megan Neumann (2011) and Trey Thompson (2011).   Phoenix - Night Hike A group of Boettcher Scholar alumni met at White Tanks Regional Park near Phoenix, Arizona for a sunset hike that included after-dark scorpion spotting. Tracy Wahl (1986), Keli Price (1976) and Pam and Martin Turman (1975) attended this fun outing on April 28.     Denver - Mindfulness Under the guidance of alumni board member Beth Baker Owens (1977), several Boettcher alumni and current scholars learned about the importance of living a centered lifestyle, and discovered how mindfulness can positively impact their lives. Our DU scholars even set intentions to integrate mindfulness into their education and community engagement routines, including educating their own students about chakra scanning and sitting meditation.   Golden - Hiking Boettcher Scholar alumni from the Denver Metro area gathered at South Table Mountain Park on April 29 for a hike among flowering wild plums and cliff faces above the City of Golden. Jennifer Meyers (1991), Mallory Bustow (2004), Tanner McManus (2011) and Garrett Mayberry (2011) were joined by Mallory’s husband, Aaron, and Jennifer’s daughter, Maya. They enjoyed Tanner’s drone photography and an after-hike lunch in Golden. ...

Saturday, June 23, 8:30 - 11:45 a.m. Denver Museum of Nature and Science Seven diverse alumni speakers will inspire you to explore your leadership, your purpose, and unique and surprising ways in which you can make your mark. Craig Heacock - The Psychedelic Revolution in Psychiatry Psychedelics are back and they are changing the way we treat mental illness. Psychiatric drugs typically dial down symptoms without changing the substrate of the illness-- these new psychedelic tools can offer the promise of transformation and even cure. Beth Skelton - Stumbling Into a New Leadership Style: Leading from Behind After Beth Skelton was scheduled to lead a class field trip to London, her co-leader, who knew London well, backed out of the trip just four weeks before departure. Beth had to create the conditions for the students to take a much more active role in the trip by empowering the students to take ownership and initiative. In the process, she fell into a new leadership style: leading from behind. Jeff Bauer - Creating a Difference: Career Transition from Health Care to Art and Music Knowing he could never quit working (retire), but tiring of the work he did for almost 50 years, 1965 scholar Jeff Bauer describes his purposeful transition from widely recognized health care expert to unknown artist and how the principles of creativity can help plan a major transition, at any stage of life. Veronica Fernandez-Diaz - Sin papeles. Sin Miedo. Sin papeles. Sin Miedo. Without papers. Without fear. Veronica, a 2015 scholar, shares the process of losing and finding herself alongside her undocumented familia, and how finding her own way of resistance motivates her life as a leader and advocate.  Mark Hess - If You Are a Lost Parent, Please Meet Your Child at the Service Desk at the Front of the Store Have you lost your child? No, not that one . . . the one inside of you. Have you kept the door open to the joy of being a kid, of living your passions, of following your heart? As a teacher of gifted children, Mark sees you--the Boettcher Scholar and the gifted adult--in his classroom and on the playground every day. Let's remember what it is like to play. Noha Kikhia - Why the World Doesn't Need More Changemakers In an increasingly connected world, we are more aware of social problems and their impact on communities across the world. Changemakers - individuals hellbent to solving those problems - have emerged and claim to be identifying new ways to solve these age-old problems. Yet aspiring to be a changemaker is not necessarily the best way to "make your mark." Dee Bradley Baker - Fan Conventions and the Human Need to Make the Fantastical Real Humans are creatures that love to create narratives, stories and mythologies that reach beyond our mundane existence. Through conventions, we can participate and live in them. The inclusive and collaboratively creative spirit of fan conventions points to a better world, and is a model for how we as humans should be directing much more of our time. Get your pass to all Signature Event activities here! This event is open to current and alumni scholars, significant others and adult family members....

Margaret Myers, a 1968 Boettcher Scholar from Denver South High School, worked her way up the ranks of the U.S. Army, ultimately retiring from the Army Reserve as a colonel. Now the director of the Institute for Defense Analyses Information Technology and Systems Division, Margaret is no stranger to high-profile jobs. She’s also no stranger to being one of only a few women in a male-dominated industry. “I had several jobs where I was the only woman in the room,” Margaret said, describing it as being one of the biggest challenges of her career. “I learned that you have to do your homework and be prepared so that when you do have the opportunity to speak up, you know what you’re talking about and people realize what you have to offer.” That’s why Margaret has made it a point to look out for other women—and men—in her career. “When one wins, we all win,” Margaret said. But when she followed her husband to Fort Bragg and joined the military in the seventies, there were very few women to look out for her. Despite this, Margaret served on active duty in the military, was a director in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence (C3I) and acted as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for C3I Acquisition. Margaret is the recipient of three Presidential Rank Awards, as well as the Defense Department Distinguished Civilian Service Award and is a Volgenau School of Engineering Distinguished Alumni from George Mason University. Although she has made many career moves and received numerous accolades since, Margaret is grateful for having received the Boettcher Scholarship, which allowed her to attend Colorado College. “I decided early on in my senior year of high school that I wanted to go to CC, but it was too expensive. I didn’t even apply until after I found out I had received a Boettcher Scholarship,” she recalled. Margaret credits CC with exposing her to a liberal arts education, even though she was a math major, and giving her critical thinking skills that she has continued to use ever since. Her college education as well as the early years in her career taught Margaret to take risks—something she now encourages others to do, especially women. “When you want something, it’s always worth asking,” she advised. “Get over the fear and intimidation and think ‘why not? All they can say is no.’” This advice has proved effective in her own life and career. When she was a new second lieutenant, Margaret really wanted to do a different job than the one she had been assigned. So, she asked the colonel. He was impressed with her courage, and ultimately, Margaret got to do the job she wanted, which has led her to each subsequent job. In her current role, Margaret focuses on cybersecurity and other cyberspace challenges of national and global significance. When she’s not working, Margaret likes to travel to Colorado to ski. “A few years ago, I realized that wherever you go, you should always be a good ambassador for Colorado,” Margaret said. “Even though I no longer live in the state, I try to be a good ambassador.”...

There were times in college and even in her early career when 1988 Boettcher Scholar Carina Raetz felt directionless. Carina attended the University of Colorado Boulder and was involved in various activities, including serving as a Certified Nursing Assistant for Alzheimer’s patients and as a radio DJ for KUCB.  She switched majors from engineering, to business and ultimately, to English and anthropology. After graduating, Carina moved to California, worked as an advertising specialist at two different radio stations and married her husband, Ed, whom she’d met at CU. Carina began volunteering with various children’s organizations and substitute teaching, which is where she finally found her niche working with children with special needs. “Working with students finally gave me direction” Carina said. After deciding to pursue teaching, Carina attended California State University and received her Master’s of Education with a special education concentration, along with credentials in Clear Cross-Cultural Language Academic Development and Mild-Moderate Disabilities Teaching. “To teach children with special needs or who speak a different language, you have to really understand students and how to reach them,” said Carina. “I’ve always liked that challenge, and I love forming relationships with people. I also believe that diverse students are an asset to the classroom.” Carina excelled in the classroom, earning multiple accolades in California, including California State University’s Leader in Education and a recognition for her class’ achievement growth in English test scores. In 2003, a death in the family prompted Carina to move back home to Colorado, where she landed a role as the special needs teacher in the small town of Ellicott, about 30 miles east of Colorado Springs. Committed to serving the community, Carina also became the dean of students, the school assessment coordinator and served on administrative and advisory committees. While there, she created the Dean’s Award to recognize kids for positive behavior and received a special recognition from the school board. Soon after, she started working closer to home and began the English-as-a-Second-Language Program (ESL) at Carver Elementary, where she has continued to work for the past nine years. Under her guidance, Carina’s students started “Student Power!,” an effort to encourage staff and students to save energy. As a result of this work, Carina’s students had the opportunity to present to world-renowned primatologist Jane Goodall. “Meeting Dr. Goodall and watching my students present their ideas to her was one of the highlights of my career,” said Carina, who had idolized Jane Goodall since learning about her as an anthropology major at CU. She also initiated two programs at Carver to bring together ESL students and their parents to participate in language and learning activities. Carina is a member of the Colorado Chapter of the National Teachers of the Year, where she works with a group of teachers to positively promote education, something she says is critical to do in the U.S. right now. And if that wasn’t enough, Carina is also working with the deputy superintendent to solve the problem of teacher retention in Colorado and recently was a finalist for the 2017 Colorado Department of Education Teacher of the Year. “I think for some reason it’s my calling to help students overcome obstacles.” It’s that calling that continues to motivate Carina to find new teaching methods and new ways of encouraging the potential of the next generation....

Floyd Pierce rushes into a downtown Denver restaurant for lunch, frenzied and apologizing for being late—on his way he was stopped by an excited fan who begged to take a photo with the reality TV star. Despite earning the moniker of “fan favorite” and a being a member of “Team Fun,” Floyd is still getting used to his newfound fame. “It’s been crazy to watch myself on TV,” said Floyd. “It took about three weeks to get used to it, but by then strangers started recognizing me and even stopping me while shopping at Target.” Two months ago, the 29th season of the CBS show The Amazing Race was about to air, and we had a chance to chat with Floyd, a 2013 scholar and one of 22 competitors on the show. At the time, Floyd had completed filming but was not allowed to discuss many of the details, including who his partner was, where he traveled and how far he made it in the race. Finally, the show has finished airing, and Floyd, now a pro at world travel, can talk freely about his experience, his partner, being a fan favorite and the devastating episode in which he was eliminated. Floyd has been surprised to hear how many fans he has, but early on, he and his partner, Becca, established themselves as one of the most likeable and competitive teams. This season of The Amazing Race was the first in which partners were assigned at the starting line, so Floyd had no idea who he might end up with, which is why he feels lucky to have found the “perfect” partner. “My first impression of Becca was that she seemed fun and looked like a stereotypical Boulder hippie,” Floyd remembered. “But when we took our first taxi together to the Los Angeles airport, I knew we had something special.” It was quickly clear that Floyd and Becca were well-matched, assuming the title of #TeamFun. Not only did they encourage each other to slow down and appreciate the race, but they also pushed each other to keep a sense of humor. “A year ago today we were strangers, and now she’s my best friend,” Floyd said. Even though there were dramatic moments and the teams were racing against each other for the $1 million prize, Floyd had nothing bad to say about his competitors. In fact, the group of 22 became very close and have since traveled to Las Vegas and LA together, with more trips planned in the future. While on the race, Floyd and Becca made it to the top five, visiting a variety of countries and often leading the pack. “Norway was my favorite,” Floyd said. “It’s unreal how beautiful it is—straight out of a fairy tale.” He also enjoyed skydiving, drumming with a samba band in Brazil, building desks for school children in Tanzania and running through the streets with a giant ladder, clogging up traffic in Vietnam. Speaking of Vietnam—that was the final country Floyd and his partner visited before being eliminated in what was considered a heartbreaking episode. Becca and Floyd were first out of five when they began that fateful challenge in Vietnam, in which Floyd had to bike one mile carrying more than 120 large, wicker shrimp traps. Floyd experienced several setbacks during that challenge, including suffering from severe heat stroke. What viewers did not see is that after attempting to complete the challenge three times, the heat stroke caused Floyd to hallucinate, at which point the paramedics stepped in and Floyd and Becca were eliminated. “Going into Vietnam, Becca and I were so used to being in the front of the pack,” Floyd said. “After arriving at the challenge first, I got too focused on beating Matt [who arrived second], when I should have just worried about taking my time and beating the other teams further behind us. I also regret not trying to ride the bike more, and instead walking with it, which took more effort.” And yet, Floyd hopes to one day return to Vietnam, and try again to successfully bike with shrimp traps in one try. In addition to his unshakable perseverance, Floyd became more confident during the race. He also learned something about his leadership—that you need to know when to step up and when to follow, and you don’t always have the luxury of time. Back in Denver, Floyd recently graduated from the University of Colorado and started working as a recruiter at Insight Global, a s staffing services company. In the future, Floyd hopes to continue embracing surprises and opportunities as they arise. As we finish lunch and discuss what lies ahead, Floyd smiles and says “Becca and I would definitely compete in The Amazing Race again if offered the opportunity to return.” Who knows, perhaps these fan favorites will be returning to primetime one day?        ...

By Amanda Cary 2014 scholar  In early June, current Boettcher scholars and alumni came together for a tour of KUNC, a public radio station that broadcasts NPR and other local news and music out of Greeley. Five members of the Boettcher community attended. They were: Paula Pulido (2016), Amanda Cary (2014), Doug Marek (1972), Steve Winograd (1968) and Ken Weaver (1963). KUNC began in 1967, but it was initially known as KCBL. After years of being affiliated with the University of Northern Colorado, the station became independent of the university in 2001 when UNC attempted to sell it to Colorado Public Radio. However, a community of dedicated listeners intervened and raised $2 million in 20 days to keep KUNC independent. Today, KUNC is operated by Community Radio for Northern Colorado, and monitored by a board of directors and advisory council. “It speaks to the value of the community,” said Neil Best, KUNC president. Though the station’s operations come from Greeley, KUNC’s presence is felt across the State of Colorado. There are 20 towers broadcasting KUNC programs across Colorado. KUNC was the first station in the state to air NPR’s “All Things Considered” and “Morning Edition.” KUNC will celebrate its 50th anniversary this year, and so much has changed beyond just ownership in 2001. The station has grown from a small, college station to an organization with a budget of $3.2 million that is sustained by 32 staff members and has 220,000 listeners. Best also recognized the challenges in the radio industry, such as the need to engage younger listeners and adjust to the technology shifts that came in 2007, when more people relied on streaming services to listen to their music and news. Facilities have also been among the significant change to the station in the past 50 years. While KUNC was initially operated on UNC’s campus, the station is now operated from an office in west Greeley, where the tour was held. Best showed the Boettcher Scholars where both prerecorded and live broadcasts are transmitted from, along with the newsroom, control room and various offices. The modern technology used to operate KUNC was juxtaposed with old-fashioned radio sets from when the station was first launched. The lobby’s wall holds a large map of Colorado, with 20 KUNC icons located across the map indicating the 20 towers. After the tour concluded, the group went to enjoy dinner and each other’s company at the Rio Grande Mexican Restaurant in downtown Greeley. The group was also able to check out the Greeley Blues Jam Kickoff event, an evening of live music and community celebration. The event brought together scholars who are all from different years and different fields, yet united in their curiosity to learn about a Colorado-based organization, and the desire to build community with their fellow Boettcher Scholars. **This tour was organized by Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board Programs Committee Co-Chair, Tracy Wahl, who worked at NPR headquarters in D.C. for 20 years....

As a city attorney with decades of experience, 1972 Boettcher Scholar Doug Marek has helped set policy and guide legislation in both Colorado and Iowa. But before Doug was an attorney, he was a teacher.  He received both his undergraduate degree and a Master of Arts in teaching from Colorado College, and began teaching at a middle school in Colorado Springs. A few years later, Doug and his wife moved to Ames, Iowa, where he taught middle school, coached sports and ultimately decided to attend law school at Iowa State University. “For three years we were both in grad school and living in student housing,” Doug recalled. “We were both career-driven and focused on the next step in our lives.” After passing the bar exam, Doug channeled his background in teaching and became a professor of law at Drake University. He was later offered a position at the Iowa Attorney General’s office, where he reported to Tom Miller—the longest-serving Attorney General in the United States. In 2005, Doug become the City Attorney for Ames, Iowa—a university town with 62,000 people, half of which were students. “I loved being involved in legal decisions that improved the residents’ quality of life and in the development of public policy that shaped the town,” said Doug. Despite his success in Iowa, a trip home to Colorado for his 40th high school reunion ended in a job offer to be the Greeley City attorney, a position he’s now proudly held for seven years. “One of the luxuries of being a public practitioner and representing government entities is that we have more discretion on what position to take,” said Doug. “That’s different than a private practitioner who has an ethical obligation to pursue the position taken by their client.” As an advisor to elected city officials, Doug is able to recommend and steer some of the key positions that Greeley takes on litigation and local legislation. “It’s rewarding to see how you can improve the lives of people, either through litigation or long-range planning,” Doug said. Looking back at his career, Doug acknowledged that it has been the personal relationships that he’s created and carefully maintained which have led to his success. “I still contact people I worked with more than 20 years ago to ask for their advice or just check in,” said Doug. When he’s not in the courtroom, you’re likely to find Doug skiing, snowshoeing or cycling —“Pedal the Plains” is an annual favorite of his. Doug is also an avid supporter of arts and music in Greeley, serving on the Dean’s Community Arts Advisory Board at the University of Northern Colorado....

DENVER, May 9, 2017 — Forty-two of Colorado’s top graduating seniors have been selected as recipients of Boettcher Foundation Scholarships. These students have committed to attending Colorado universities where they will use their immense talents to improve our communities right here at home. “The Boettcher Scholarship aims to keep Colorado’s highest-potential students in the state by connecting them with the outstanding opportunities offered by our in-state institutions,” said Katie Kramer, CEO of the Boettcher Foundation. “Boettcher Scholars become part of a vast network of alumni and community leaders who will support and engage them throughout their lifetimes.” Established in 1952, the Boettcher Scholarship program annually awards 42 scholarships to graduating high school seniors in the State of Colorado. The four-year scholarship includes virtually all expenses to attend the Colorado school of the recipient’s choice: full tuition, fees, a book allowance and an annual stipend for living expenses. Scholars are selected based on academics, service, leadership and character. The Boettcher Scholar community includes more than 2,400 individuals who have gone on to make their marks in business, politics, academia and other endeavors. Among them are a Nobel Prize winner, a MacArthur “Genius Award” recipient, multiple Rhodes Scholars, U.S. Ambassadors, CEOs, elected officials, and numerous leaders in the business, academic and nonprofit communities. “The 2017 Boettcher Scholars were selected from a pool of more than 1,400 incredibly qualified applicants,” said Tiffany Anderson, director of the scholarship program. “This year’s class includes a young woman who helps refugees by gathering and distributing donations; a young man who not only launched his own software business but also started an incubator for other student entrepreneurs; and a student who has produced more than 15 short films. We’re confident that this year’s class represents the values that the Boettcher family sought to encourage.” In 2015, the Boettcher Foundation increased the number of scholarships awarded annually from 40 to 42, thanks to a generous donation from B. Grady and Lori Durham of Denver. Scholar names and photos follow. High-resolution images available upon request. About the Boettcher Foundation At Boettcher, we believe in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. Every day we champion excellence across our state by investing in our most talented citizens and highpotential organization, because supporting their hard work and leadership will enable them to give back for years to come. For more information, visit www.boettcherfoundation.org. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Kristi Arellano 303-285-6208 kristi@boettcherfoundation.org Jon Abrahamson Lakewood HS (CU) Daniel Barnes Basalt HS (CC) Paige Beckman Wray HS (CU) Shamik Bhat Golden HS (UCD) Camryn Daidone Denver School of the Arts (CSU) Hannah deKay Silverton HS (Regis) Ansh Desai Legend HS (CU) Lenka Doskocil Bayfield HS (CSU) Jacob Fuhrman Silver Creek HS (CU) Bridget Galaty Denver School of the Arts (CC) Leah Gibson Smoky Hill HS (CSU) Lindsey Hamblin Skyline HS (CU) Kiana Harkema Falcon HS (CU) Austin Herman Holyoke HS (CU) Katelynn Hughes Pine Creek HS (CU) Troy Jackson Lakewood HS (DU) Bradley Johnson Kit Carson HS (CSU) Dakota Kisling Lakewood HS (CU) Henry Kvietok Cherokee Trail HS (CU) Jordan Lobato Center HS (CSU) Tahlia Lucero Mapleton Expeditionary School of the Arts (DU) Keller MacLachlan Denver South HS (CU) Sydney Marchando Rock Canyon HS (CSM) Anastasia Mathews La Junta HS (CU) Jacob Morgan Coal Ridge HS (CU) Spencer Narowetz Jefferson Academy HS (CU) Armando Ocampo Broomfield HS (CSM) Nicholas Penzel Roaring Fork HS (CC) Benjamin Powell Conifer HS (DU) Harper Powell Salida HS (CU) Naitra Ramchander Poudre HS (DU) Anna Renkert Denver South HS (CC) Cherokee Ronolo-Valdez Denver South HS (DU) Ariel Sandoval Centauri HS (CU) Luke Srsen Wray HS (DU) Jenna Trost Castle View HS (CU) Casey Turner Meeker HS (CSM) Ryan Vandersmith Rock Canyon HS (CSM) Niketna Vivek Legend HS (CU) Elizabeth Ward Delta HS (DU) Lauren Weiss Littleton HS (CC) Hossna Yasini Prairie View HS (UCD) ...