Author: Kristi Arellano

DENVER, January 18, 2017 — Gregory Moore, former editor of The Denver Post, has joined the Boettcher Foundation Board of Trustees. Moore brings a deep knowledge of the issues impacting Colorado’s communities as well as a commitment to advancing the state. “Greg’s experience telling the stories of our state and highlighting the people who are making a difference in Colorado make him an ideal candidate for the Boettcher Foundation Board of Trustees,” said Tim Schultz, president of the Boettcher Foundation. “Greg has also displayed a strong commitment to the nonprofit community at both the national and local level, and we are excited he will be sharing his wisdom and talent with us.” Moore was editor of The Denver Post for 14 years. During that time, the newspaper won four consecutive Pulitzer Prizes. His journalism career spanned 40 years, with stops in Dayton and Cleveland, Ohio and 16 years at The Boston Globe, where he rose to managing editor. He currently teaches journalism at the University of Colorado’s College of Media, Communication and Information. “The Boettcher Foundation has had a significant impact in Colorado, and I am honored to contribute to an organization that is helping Colorado’s students, teachers, researchers and nonprofit community,” Moore said. A native of Cleveland, Greg is the oldest of five siblings. He graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with a Bachelor of Arts in journalism and political science. He and his wife, Nina, have two daughters, Jasmine, 14, and Jaden, 12. The Boettcher Foundation Board of Trustees also announced its new slate of officers for 2017. Russell George, retired president of Colorado Northwestern Community College, will become chair. Paul H. Chan, general counsel for the University of Denver, will become vice chair, and Theodore F. Schlegel, M.D. will serve as past chair. Sharon H. Linhart, founder of Linhart Public Relations, will continue as secretary, and Donald McG. Woods, regional CEO of USI Insurance Services, will continue as treasurer. The board of trustees also renewed the terms of Kenzo Kawanabe and Judith B. Wagner, both of whom were initially appointed to the board in 2014. Kawanabe is a partner and commercial trial lawyer with Denver law firm Davis, Graham & Stubbs LLP. Wagner founded and served as president and CEO of Wagner Investment Management Inc., which was merged into CoBiz Wealth in 2010. For detailed bios on all Boettcher Foundation Trustees, visit boettcherfoundation.org/boettcher-staff-and-trustees. About the Boettcher Foundation: At Boettcher, we believe in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. Every day we champion excellence across our state by investing in our most talented citizens and high-potential organizations, because supporting their hard work and leadership will enable them to give back for years to come. Contact: Kristi Arellano 303.285.6208 kristi@boettcherfoundation.org...

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Name: Jordan Rudman Scholar Year: 2013 Hometown: Denver College(s), Degree(s) and Graduation Year(s): Colorado College, molecular biology major, music minor, graduating 2017 What are you currently interested in pursuing after graduating? I’ll be applying to medical school this summer, to begin in the fall of 2018. I’m interested in pursuing emergency medicine, but I’m certainly open to other possibilities as well. In the meantime, I’ll be moving back to Denver where I hope to continue working as an EMT in either a hospital emergency department or with a local ambulance company. Additionally, I hope to continue my musical hobbies: playing jazz piano and singing. Tell us about what activities, groups and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. I’ve been in far too many music ensembles: choir, jazz combo and Balinese Gamelan, to name a few. I have appreciated the opportunity to pursue music along with my pre-medicine studies; I hope to always have that balance in my life. I also help run CC’s student EMS squad. We respond to medical emergencies on campus and provide education and training opportunities in pre-hospital medicine. It’s been extremely rewarding to help lead an organization of students caring for other students. Tell us about an important mentor you have had. I had a middle school teacher, David, who would play geography trivia with me on the school bus ride to soccer practice. He saw me for exactly who I was and taught me to embrace it; for that I will always be extremely grateful. I no longer play soccer, but I still love trivia. What's the best advice you've ever received? When playing in a jazz band: listen more than you play. As someone who is very comfortable talking, that’s been an important lesson and one that I’ve found vastly improves many aspects of my life. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why? Dr. Oliver Sacks. He was the most beautiful embodiment of an artistic scientist....

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Name: Jessica Joy (Fawcett) Cuthbertson Scholar Year: 1997 Hometown: Rocky Ford College(s), Degree(s) and Graduation Year(s): Regis University, B.A., Communication Arts & Sociology, 2001; University of Colorado Denver, M.A., Curriculum and Instruction, 2009; University of Denver, Morgridge College of Education, Principal Licensure, 2015; National Board Certified Teacher (NBCT) Tell us about your current work and how long you’ve been doing it. What is your favorite aspect of your current occupation? I currently serve on the communications team at the Center for Teaching Quality, a national nonprofit committed to ensuring a high-quality public education system for all students, driven by the bold ideas and expert practices of teachers. Prior to joining CTQ full time in 2016, I worked in K-12 public education for over 13 years and served as a middle school English teacher and learning lab host, an instructional coach and a "teacherpreneur." Working in public education, both within and outside the K-12 classroom, and now from the nonprofit perspective, is joyful and challenging work. Seeing growth in students and working with educators to elevate and amplify their voices are the most rewarding aspects. What role has being a Boettcher Scholar played into where you are and what you are doing now? Without question, the Boettcher Foundation’s values helped shape who I am today. I believe it is vital to cultivate and retain our state’s talent and expertise, in large part because of the Boettcher Foundation’s influence. As a result of the Boettcher Scholarship, I was able to attend my top in-state choice of college, Regis University, and their mission of “men and women in the service of others” has guided my professional decisions and postgraduate endeavors. I also worked for the Boettcher Foundation as a fellow in 2001-02, and my experiences traveling the state to speak with counselors, high school students and parents about the scholarship inspired me to pursue a career in public education. Being a Boettcher Scholar continues to drive my commitment to working toward a more equitable public education system for all students in rural, suburban and urban districts across our great state. Tell us about your involvement in activities, organizations or groups outside of work. I’m a self-proclaimed “edu-geek” so most of my involvement, unsurprisingly, is connected to the field of education. I serve on Chalkbeat Colorado’s Reader Advisory Board and follow local and national education policy closely. You can find me interacting with educators via social media, including participating in or moderating Twitter chats, webinars and blogging roundtable discussions on any given weeknight. I also serve as the state captain of the Colorado Core Advocates, a network of passionate K-12 educators committed to standards implementation and equitable, high-quality instruction in our state’s classrooms. We are also active members of St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church in Aurora. What’s the best advice you’ve received and what advice do you have for new graduates entering your career field? Growing up in a rural area, my parents always encouraged me to pursue my passions, from community theater to journalism. They’d often quote the phrase: “Don’t do something today, that you wouldn’t want to read about in tomorrow’s newspaper.” Even though we are less of a newspaper culture, I think this is great advice, especially in our social media-driven society. Their support has helped me discern, reflect and fail forward at different crossroads in my life. My advice for aspiring educators? Visit (and study) as many classrooms as you can, and ask for feedback (from students, colleagues and formal evaluators) as much as possible. You’ll become a more culturally responsive teacher much quicker if you let students guide, inform and shape your pedagogy. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why? I’d love to organize many dinner parties with historical figures and thinkers from around the globe! I minored in women’s studies at Regis, and believe we’re living in a really interesting time to explore aspects of gender, sexism and civil rights. I would probably start with an invitation to suffragists and abolitionists Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. I would love to thank them for their activism, learn more about the challenges they faced in their advocacy efforts and pick their brain about contemporary social justice issues, including best practices for scaling women’s leadership in the 21st century....

By Joe Vaccarelli  YourHub Reporter Kids Club night at the Joshua Station transitional housing complex can be a hectic event that sometimes sees nearly 50 kids pile into a converted hotel room to do activities. Jodi Henni has two children, younger than 10, who participate in Kids Club and said it can be tough to focus. The family has lived at Joshua Station for about a year. “It’s hard for them, it’s just chaos,” Henni said. But things are about to change at the facility that helps homeless families transition from the street to stable living environments as $356,000 in renovations will bring along a new kids programming area about 10 times the size of the current space.    ...

By Amy Hamilton  Grand Junction Sentinel If a person with disabilities wants to go on a bike ride, the process could take days. The folks at Colorado Discover Ability must assemble a bike to fit that person’s specifications. The bike is loaded on a trailer and shuttled down to the Colorado Riverfront Trail. The rider must get to the trail, too. Now, it’s time to ride. Let’s hope the weather holds.    ...

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Angelique Diaz. Name: Brandon Kahlil Thomas Scholar Year: 2014 Hometown: Aurora College(s), Degree(s) and Graduation Year(s): University of Colorado-Boulder, Linguistics (B.A./M.A.), December 2018 What are you currently interested in pursuing after graduating? The fun thing about being a linguist is that there are very diverse opportunities available. My current plan is to teach English in Korea before coming back to the metro area and doing the same work for Colorado adults who don’t speak English. I’m also interested in doing work with local governments attempting to communicate with and hear the needs of immigrant populations. Colorado is a hotspot for immigration, and language barriers have left thousands of people without a voice. I want to help build a society where every voice can be heard, in whatever language it has access to. Tell us about what activities, groups and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. At CU, I work often with the Black Student Alliance (BSA), Queer and Trans People of Color (QTPoC) and UMAS y MEChA (a Chicano-run Latinx student group). Identity is at the crux of what I study because I think that identity is at the center of how we learn about ourselves and others. I work with these groups on campus because they build people who look and think like me to be advocates and activists, and build communities together. Connecting with other Black, Latinx and Queer people is key to my emotional health, and the communities I’ve built from these groups encourage me to blossom and be better. Tell us about an important mentor you have had. To this day, my most trusted mentor is an old high school teacher, David Gates. Mr. Gates is one of those rare men who can find beauty in anyone, significance in anything and comedy in any place. And he is brilliant! I spent many weeks just watching the way he interacted with people around us, in the classroom and outside of it, and he inspired me to be to empathetic and caring person I’m growing to be: he truly is the embodiment of caring and understanding. I hope to visit him and his wife soon in Japan. What's the best advice you've ever received? Someone once told me, “At the end of the day, the best way to measure success is looking in a mirror.” I don’t remember who said it to me, but it encouraged me to begin a ritual of looking in the mirror every morning and thinking about who I saw there, and how I felt about him. Especially in recent years, that’s something that I’ve had to do at several points to gauge my own success and make sure I am a person I enjoy being. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why? My mother named me after the Lebanese poet and philosopher Kahlil Gibran, and I feel like in many ways, that makes him a part of me. I’ve read most of his works, but I think it’d be pleasant to sit down with him, face to face, and share a nice meal....

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Angelique Diaz. Name: Veronica Fernandez-Diaz Scholar Year: 2015 Hometown: Originally from Mexico, spent most time in Thornton College(s), Degree(s) and Graduation Year(s): Colorado College; Pursuing Bachelor’s Degree, 2019 What are you currently interested in pursuing after graduating? I am definitely not sure. I have thought of pursuing law school after college. I know that I want to pursue some kind of role in which I can fight for social justice, but I don’t know in what way I will do so. I am still exploring! Tell us about what activities, groups and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. Currently, I am a mentor for the Bridge Scholars Program and Questbridge chapter at Colorado College. I mentor upcoming freshmen from different backgrounds throughout their transition to college. I became a mentor because there is no way that I would be where I am now without the people who have challenged me and encouraged me along the way. As a mentor, I want to ensure that upcoming students understand that their presence matters and empower them to pursue their vision of success. I am also part of the Honor Council, which upholds academic integrity on campus. Since last year, I have been a part of the Inclusion and Diversity Committee which ensures that the processes within the honor council and those surrounding the honor code create a system that is fair to all students. I joined the Honor Council in the first place because JROTC definitely instilled in me the importance of integrity. I slowly learned the unjust processes that existed and joined the Diversity and Inclusion Committee to address these issues. I am also a part of Humans of Colorado College, based on Humans of New York, in which I get to listen to the narratives of individuals at CC and then share that with our community. I joined this project because, for me, true connections are those in which you truly get to know people and their story. I know that everyone has something different to share and I find it meaningful and beautiful to listen to the unique narratives of every individual. Tell us about an important mentor you have had. My high school counselor is one the most important mentors in my life. My high school years bring me many fond memories, but they were also the toughest years of my life and my counselor was always there for me when I need her. I trusted her with everything and she would listen patiently. She offered me opportunities and continues advocating for students like me. Mrs. GT helped me understand my limits, understand my worth and pushed to become a better person. What's the best advice you've ever received? The best advice I have ever received is to hold on to the vision that I have for myself. This is honestly advice that I received just a couple days ago, but one that I realized has kept me going through the hurdles that I have experienced. I have this vision for myself, that is blurry and mostly unclear, but one in which I am part in creating change. This is a vision that is hard to hold onto and hard to keep believing knowing all the obstacles on the way, but if I keep that vision in mind I know that I am, in a sense, empowering myself to always chose the path of resiliency. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why? Dolores Huerta and Cesar Chavez come to mind because of the impact that they had on worker rights. After going to Texas and learning a bit about the history of farm workers and the oppression they faced, I would really love to get a sense of the passion that continues to drive Huerta and that drove Chavez to mobilize people in demanding the rights they deserve. I find their dynamic particularly interesting and would want to understand it through each of their points of view....

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Angelique Diaz. Name: Ronald (Ron) B. Wiley Scholar Year: 1974 Hometown: Boone College(s), Degree(s) and Graduation Year(s): Colorado State University - B.S. Bio-Agricultural Science, 1977; Colorado State University- M.S. Plant Genetics & Breeding, 1979; Azusa Pacific University - M.A. Organizational Leadership, 2008; Nova Southeastern University - Ph.D. (ABD) Conflict Analysis & Resolution, 2017 (anticipated). Tell us about your current work and how long you’ve been doing it. What is your favorite aspect of your current occupation? I currently work as Director of Field Personnel with Resource Exchange International, Inc., a small humanitarian development agency based in Colorado Springs. REI, Inc. places professionals alongside their counterparts in emerging nations -- hospitals, universities, business settings, development projects -- where they invest both in learning from and sharing with their colleagues, equipping them so that they can lead out in developing their nations. In Djibouti, our team has launched the first English-medium K-12 international school. In Vietnam, our staff are helping implement the “2020” program of introducing English as a foreign language into every classroom in the country. In Laos, our team launched the first surgical residency program. In Indonesia, poverty alleviation takes the form of a mango processing and drying project in collaboration with a grower cooperative, adding value, jobs and environmental and social sustainability. I’ve been with REI, Inc. for 22 years, including 16 years in Kazakhstan, and the last six in my current role. The favorite aspect of my current occupation is traveling to meet with our field staff in six countries, and encouraging them in the excellent work that they do. What role has being a Boettcher Scholar played into where you are and what you are doing now? Being a Boettcher Scholar kept me in Colorado for my B.S. and M.S., and I met my wife while at CSU. My college years were transformational for me, and my entire career has been spent serving in the nonprofit sector as a result. My early engagement in opportunities for crossing cultures led to our long tenure living in and contributing to the development of Kazakhstan as an emerging nation. We’re back in Colorado involved in elder care, and it has given us the opportunity to give back to our home community in Southern Colorado, while continuing our traveling contribution internationally. Tell us about your involvement in activities, organizations or groups outside of work. Besides involvement in a local church congregation, I moonlight as a restorative practices facilitator/trainer/consultant for Pueblo area schools, the justice system, and occasionally our local university. This has grown out of my doctoral studies into indigenous restorative conflict resolution practices. Besides my vocation, my avocation, and my studies, I enjoy hiking in the mountains in whatever part of the world I happen to be at the moment. What’s the best advice you’ve received and what advice do you have for current graduates entering your career field? The best advice that I’ve received are the words of Jesus: “Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called children of God.” I consider my work and the work of our non-profit to be peacemaking work. As advice for anyone considering entering the field of peacemaking, I would offer this short poem, written by Edwin Markham, called “Outwitted”: "He drew a circle that shut me out Heretic, rebel, a thing to flout But love and I had the wit to win; We drew a circle that took him in." If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why? I would choose to have dinner with Jesus, Mahatma Gandhi, Badsha Khan, and Martin Luther King, Jr. I would want to join them in dialogue on the spirituality of nonviolent social change, religion and peacemaking, since each of them serve as inspiration for me in my life and work....

Professor, school board member, entrepreneur and puppy trainer. Any of these roles could be a full-time gig for most people, but in true Boettcher Scholar style, JulieMarie Shepherd Macklin finds a way to juggle all of these and more. A 2004 Boettcher Scholar from Hinkley High School in Aurora, JulieMarie was recently hired as an instructor in the Presidents Leadership Class at the University of Colorado. The new role marks another step in a career path that has centered around community engagement and leadership. JulieMarie studied political science at CU, where she also participated in the Presidents Leadership Class. Her plan was to go to law school, but an internship at the Colorado State Capitol sparked a passion for politics while also leading to a paid staff position for two legislative sessions. She ultimately pursued both a master’s degree and Ph.D., focusing her research on American politics at the state and local level. In addition to writing her doctoral dissertation on school boards in Colorado, JulieMarie campaigned for and was elected to the board of Aurora Public Schools in 2009. She continues to serve in that role, which she describes as both incredibly demanding and extremely rewarding. “It’s been a hard time to be in the education space,” she acknowledged, noting that budget cuts have meant that much of her time is spent trying to determine how to balance dwindling budgets with minimal impact on students.” The rewards, however, show up when JulieMarie attends high school graduations, helping to present diplomas to eager graduates. “Getting to shake their hands as they walk across the stage, that is one of the most important and most impactful things I get to do,” she said. “That’s where you get to see that decision-making, and all of the structures and policies we put in place come together.” During her tenure on the school board, JulieMarie served board as president for three years. She currently serves as president of the Colorado Association of School Boards. She has managed to do all this while also holding a full-time job. She spent three years as a researcher for the Spark Policy Institute before joining the staff at the Colorado Department of Education. She left the Department of Education to take on her new role at CU. JulieMarie is eager to share her passion for public service, and she recently participated in a panel for members of the Boettcher Scholar community who were interested in pursuing public service. When asked to offer advice for people interested in public service, she noted that there are numerous opportunities to be involved and serve your community. “People equate (public service) with elected office but there are so many meaningful ways to serve that aren’t elected,” she said. “Look for different boards and commissions. Most communities are in need of committed and informed citizens to serve in these roles.” She also advises not getting discouraged if you run for a position and aren’t elected, as was her own experience when she ran for the Colorado State Legislature two years ago. In addition to her busy schedule as a college professor and school board member, JulieMarie also operates a small business selling custom-decorated sugar cookies. The business, Frosted Jules LLC, is an outgrowth of one of her favorite hobbies. While she typically only handles two to three orders per month, each order usually takes upwards of four days from start to finish. JulieMarie also raises guide dog puppies. She and her husband, Michael Macklin, also have two of their own dogs, who she refers to as “career-changers” because they weren’t good fits as guide dogs. Raising guide dogs has been a constant since JulieMarie was a student, and she distinctly remembers bringing one of her earliest trainees to her Boettcher Scholarship interview, which she considers a major turning point in her life. “Boettcher made me who I am today,” she said. “Receiving the Boettcher Scholarship was such an amazing gift and honor. Not having to think about finances allowed me to focus and take advantage of college experience, be involved in clubs, travel, take extra classes – it opened up opportunities that I wouldn’t have otherwise had.”      ...

By Aldo Svaldi  The Denver Post Assets at Colorado foundations rose 24.3 percent between 2011 and 2014, which in turn led to an 11.2 percent jump in contributions to charitable causes, according to a report Thursday from Philanthropy Southwest. “The philanthropic sector has recovered from the great recession,” said Tim Schultz, president and executive director of the Boettcher Foundation and board president of Philanthropy Southwest, the country’s oldest membership association for grant-makers.    ...