Author: Kristi Arellano

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Name: Reilly Quist Scholar Year: 2014 Hometown:Delta College(s), Degree(s) and Graduation Year(s): University of Colorado Denver, Major-Biology, Minor-Ethics, 2018 What are you currently interested in pursuing after graduating? After graduation, I plan to go to medical school and hope to become a pediatrician in a rural community. I grew up in a small town and would love to go back to that area to serve my community. I would love to attend the Anschutz Medical Campus here in Denver, but I am also considering Michigan Medical School, Perelman School of Medicine and Baylor College of Medicine. My dream as of right now is to be a primary care physician because they create such close bonds with their patients, and can be extremely influential in the children’s lives. Tell us about what activities, groups and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. The most amazing organization I have joined during my college career has been Roundup River Ranch (RRR). This is a camp for children with life-threatening and serious illnesses. I love camp because it really changes the campers’ lives. It is a place where they make their very first real friends. It is a place where they don’t feel any different or less than others. They can accomplish anything they want to at camp, no matter what their medical limitations are. I will continue working at RRR even beyond my college career when I become a doctor. Tell us about an important mentor you have had. One of the most important mentors I have met since coming to UCD is Dr. Charles Ferguson. I came from a small school where I usually only had one other person in my classes. During my first few months of college, I failed much more than I succeeded. I didn’t know what to do to fix that. Dr. Ferguson was always there for me, telling me that he believed in me and that I was here for a reason. Without his support, I probably wouldn’t have made it through my freshman year. What's the best advice you've ever received? The best advice I have received was actually from another student. His advice was to “fail forward."  He told me that in college we will all inevitably fail sooner rather than later. However, what we do after failing is what will define us and determine how far we will go. Failing forward means that each failure needs to encourage you to be better. You need to acknowledge what went wrong, make a plan for how to avoid those problems a second time, and then stop dwelling on that failure and instead look forward to the successes you will have. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why? If I could have dinner with a few people from history, I would choose doctors who worked on unethical medical studies. Although this may sound like a strange answer, I think I would gain beneficial insight from them. As a future physician, I believe that it is our job to ensure that such unethical practices never happen again. The best way to ensure that is to learn exactly how a doctor just like any of us got to that mindset where they could do those sorts of things to other people. By understanding their journey, we can avoid it ourselves....

By Carlos Solorzano 2004 Boettcher Scholar “The reasonable man [& woman] adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in adapting the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man [& woman]” This is a powerful quote from George Bernard Shaw, and the way of life for the Unreasonable Institute. Now what is the Unreasonable Institute, you might be asking? They are a local, Boulder-based nonprofit whose mission is to support and leverage entrepreneurs as they solve the world’s greatest problems. Since 2009, more than 16 million lives have been impacted by Unreasonable, in areas such as environmental safety, malnutrition, education and poverty. Recently, Boettcher Scholars were fortunate enough to have Unreasonable’s head of global expansion, Banks Benitez, teach us about the secrets of the most successful entrepreneurs. The greatest part about listening to Banks was learning that anyone could be an entrepreneur – it just means being willing to rethink the way you do things, and being okay with being “unreasonable.” As we progress through school, we are often taught that there is only one “right” answer. And if you spend enough time thinking through the problem, you will get to that single right answer. Let’s be real though, life (and its biggest problems) is never cut-and-dry. There are far too many variables and exceptions to have only one answer. Successful entrepreneurs understand that multiple answers exist, and more importantly, they recognize that their initial answer will likely be wrong. This is not some kind of self-deprecating attitude that entrepreneurs share, but rather a wisdom to understand the importance of feedback. Our first answer is based on our limited understanding of the problem, and this answer is made in isolation from the rest of the world. Feedback helps us understand our oversights and gaps, as well as our strengths. With each round of feedback our answer improves and becomes more complete. This is where the unreasonable man or woman has a leg up. We are trained to be thinkers first - to front-end our time buried in books or in our heads, until we decide on the “right” answer and finally take action. But entrepreneurs can concurrently take action while thinking, and they are not afraid to fail a few times until they get to their answer. Boettcher Scholars learned about one of the entrepreneur’s most powerful tools for getting feedback: rapid prototyping. Entrepreneurs rarely have enough time, resources, or money on hand (sounds a lot like a college student right?), but they must create a product regardless. So they go through fast and successive trials, tinkering and fine-tuning their product after each round. The first few prototypes might be failures, but they quickly learn why, and they do so with relatively little cost of time and money. Take Zappos for example – they are a highly successful retailer today, but when they started they didn’t know whether an online shoe store would be feasible, so they didn’t purchase any of their own inventory. But how do you start a shoe business without any shoes? When a customer ordered the shoes on their website, they went to the shoe store down the road, bought those shoes, packaged them up, and then delivered them to the customer. After a while, they realized that people would actually buy shoes online before trying them…and the rest is history. Rapid prototyping helped them cheaply and quickly test the feasibility of their business first without the need for heavy investment. Thinking through all the details would not have been nearly as fast or effective as the approach Zappos took. Our Boettcher Scholars practiced these same approaches during the recent weekend workshop, looking to tackle the problems of food waste, career exploration and debt reduction. The scholars went to the streets, called up friends and leveraged each other to get feedback on their initial solutions, and had successfully made multiple revisions to their approach. In a half-day, they created mock “phone apps” using construction paper, tested their business strategies with prospective clients and spoke with actual businesses to see if their analytical tool would meet their clients’ needs. They were amazed by how quickly they went from nothing earlier that day to testable products a few short hours later. If we give them a few months, who knows what they could accomplish! Whether or not this group goes on to become entrepreneurs in the future, they walked away with some great new entrepreneurial techniques to apply in their everyday lives. These lessons - like the willingness to fail and to take action while still having unanswered questions – could go far with the entire Boettcher community. A community who has impressive skill and aptitude that can change the world, but because of that same skill and aptitude, has also been conditioned to believe they need to excel in everything they do and always have the “right” answer. That pressure to succeed is a double-edged sword that can create artificial barriers to making large-scale and highly impactful change. Don’t let that hold you back though. Harness your inner-entrepreneur and remember that we will likely be wrong the first time around; but by going out there and trying anyway, we can learn a great deal more than we ever could by waiting until that elusive “right” answer appears. A great big thanks goes out to Banks Benitez, and to the Unreasonable Institute, for their time and genius this past weekend. Keep up the amazing work! For more information about the Unreasonable Institute, check out their website at https://unreasonableinstitute.org/....

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Name: Norma Mozeé Scholar Year: 1979 Hometown: Denver College(s), Degree(s) and Graduation Year(s): Colorado School of Mines, B.S. Mineral Engineering Mathematics, Minor in Geophysics – 1983 University Colorado Denver, Masters of Global Energy Management (GEM) – 2010 Grand Canyon University, M.A. Educational Administration, 2010 Tell us about your current work and how long you’ve been doing it. What is your favorite aspect of your current occupation? I started my international business advisory consultancy, Afinidad Americas, two and a half years ago. "Afinidad" means "affinity" in Spanish. The vision and name came from a lifetime of personal and business experience. My passion is creating affinity between the U.S. and Latin America. Being born in Denver to an African American father and a Mexican mother, I sense I was born to this mission to bridge cultures through business, which results in deepening relationships and understanding on both sides of the border. What role has being a Boettcher Scholar played into where you are and what you are doing now? I am eternally grateful to the Boettcher Foundation for my scholarship. I have to share a deeply personal story: my father died on the second day of my second year in college. Without my Boettcher Scholarship, I would not have been able to continue and complete college. It still brings tears to my eyes to realize that the scholarship allowed me to complete school after my father’s death. I was able to concentrate fully on getting the best education. It also positioned me to contribute back to Denver and Colorado, and now the world. You know it’s prestigious when every time I mention that I was a Boettcher Scholar you hear the audible “Oohs" and "Ahhs.” Tell us about your involvement in activities, organizations or groups outside of work. The list is long, but the running themes of my outside interests are the cross-section of creating global understanding and education. I’m on the board of WorldDenver, a nonprofit dedicated to connecting Denver and the world through the international delegations it brings to Denver and its speaker series. I’m also on the board of Colorado School of Mines Alumni Association. I recently started up the Women at Mines interest group. We’re dedicated to fostering opportunities for women interested in attending Mines and entering STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) careers.   What’s the best advice you’ve received and what advice do you have for current graduates entering your career field? The mind has the power to ignite or snuff out your dreams. Manage your mindset, and you’ll manage your outcomes. It all starts with getting in touch with your authentic self and drowning out the background noise of what others think you should do versus what you believe in and are passionate about. Follow your passion and personal fulfillment will follow. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why? Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the Obamas and Mother Theresa. They all beat the odds and broke through the tide of resistance. Their resilience, dignity, grace and resolve to unify humanity and make the world better for those that don’t have a voice or are invisible is the example I’d like to leave as a legacy. I find it important to stay anchored during this divisive political climate by remembering Dr. King’s words: “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.”...

October 4, 2016 — The Boettcher Foundation Board of Trustees has awarded $840,000 in capital grants to 16 nonprofit organizations in Colorado. The grants will help support community enrichment projects throughout the state. “One of the great things about Colorado is the many organizations that aim to improve their communities right here at home,” said Tim Schultz, president and executive director of the Boettcher Foundation. “Each of these organizations is working hard to support the communities they serve, and we are happy to fund their vision.” This year’s grant recipients in the Boettcher Foundation’s community enrichment category are: Community Foundation of Northern Colorado – Northeastern Colorado, $50,000: Toward the creation of a community fund for northeastern Colorado Denver Art Museum – Denver, $175,000: Toward a comprehensive plan to complete the campus with major refurbishment to the north building and redesign of the campus grounds Denver Public Library – Denver, $25,000: Toward renovations and expansion of the Hadley Branch Library Kids Connection - City of Monte Vista – Monte Vista, $35,000: Toward the purchase and renovation of a new youth development center Lake Dillon Theatre Company – Silverthorne, $35,000: Toward construction of a new performing arts facility and cultural center Midway Theater and Cultural Events Center – Burlington, $35,000: Toward purchase and renovation of the theater and cultural events center Opera Colorado – Denver, $25,000: Toward the purchase of innovative stage technology Rocky Mountain PBS – Denver, $200,000: Toward construction of the Buell Public Media Center, the new home of Rocky Mountain PBS Rocky Mountain Youth Corps – Steamboat Springs, $55,000: Toward renovations to the existing administrative building and construction of the new field operations building Sedgwick County – Julesburg, $15,000: Toward renovations of the depot for a museum and historic byway trailhead center Steamboat Art Museum – Steamboat Springs, $20,000: Toward renovation and expansion of exhibit and program space Tabor Opera House - City of Leadville – Leadville, $35,000: Toward the purchase of the historic Tabor Opera House The Gardens on Spring Creek – Fort Collins, $35,000: Toward expansion of the visitor's center and completion of the gardens' master plan The Tank, a Center for the Sonic Arts – Rangely, $15,000: Toward improvements to make the venue available for recording artists and the general public Ute Indian Museum - History Colorado – Montrose, $50,000: Toward renovation and expansion of the Ute Indian Museum Wetmore Library and Community Center- Custer County – Wetmore, $35,000: Toward renovations to the Wetmore Community Center and Library   Download a PDF copy of this press release. About the Boettcher Foundation At Boettcher we believe in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. Every day we champion excellence across our state by investing in our most talented citizens and high-potential organizations, because supporting their hard work and leadership will enable them to give back for years to come. For more information, visit www.boettcherfoundation.org. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Kristi Arellano 303.285.6208 kristi@boettcherfoundation.org...

By Laura Bond  Confluence Denver In southwestern Colorado, Ridgway is a small town with a laser focus on the arts. With a critical mass of creative residents, years of hard work are paying off. When Ashley King-Grambley moved from the small town of Gunnison to the tiny one of Ridgway, she had a chief concern: "I thought I would be bored out of my mind," she says. "Instead, I'm exhausted." King-Grambley moved to take a job as executive director of Weehawken Creative Arts, a nonprofit community arts school and venue. When she first arrived, in 2008, she worked a couple of jobs, as many in Ridgway do. She got to know locals and the San Juan mountains that frame the spare and stunning valley in which the town sits. If she was bored, she was too busy to notice.    ...

The following article appeared in the September 12 issue of the National Scholarship Providers Association’s Scholarship Times newsletter. In it, Tiffany Anderson, our scholarship program director, describes the Boettcher Foundation's efforts to quantitatively track the impact of our scholarship program. As scholarship providers, we often wonder if our scholarships are actually having the intended impact on students. Anecdotally, we hear about the amazing things scholarship recipients do after graduating, but quantitatively measuring the impact can be difficult. That’s why at the Boettcher Foundation, we decided to embark on a nine-month evaluation process. For more than 60 years, Boettcher Scholars have gone on to accomplish great things. They become Marshall and Rhodes scholars, Nobel laureates, nationally renowned doctors, accomplished politicians and even famous actors. Beyond receiving what is essentially a merit-based fullride scholarship to any Colorado institution, they gain access to a vast network of alumni leaders. Scholars often say that the “Boettcher connection” is what propelled their achievements beyond college, and helped in finding their best friends, business partners and future investors. So, we decided to transform the anecdotes into quantitative metrics that would show whether the Boettcher Scholarship has been successful in meeting our goal— keeping the best and brightest in-state for college, and connecting and engaging the community so they become better leaders, community servants and philanthropists. Not only would we be able to communicate the value of the scholarship—and the impact of the Boettcher Foundation’s original investment in each scholar—but the evaluation would also inform our future programming efforts and the way we engage with scholars and alumni. To effectively measure 60-years’ worth of impact and ensure validity, we contracted with the Denver-based company, Quantitative Research Evaluation & Measurement (QREM), which has experience in evaluating programs and scholarships, including the multi-state Daniels Fund Scholarship. Our hypothesis was that the research would show that Boettcher Scholars are serving, leading and giving back at a higher rate than the compare group. QREM developed a set of questions focused on leadership, service and philanthropy that could be compared to the general U.S. population. To test our theory, QREM constructed a survey which incorporates commonly-used questions that can be directly compared with sources like the National Time Use Survey, the U.S. Census and other public records. For example, questions about workplace ethics directly correlate with achievement and service and one’s ability to be promoted to a formal leadership role within a company. Voting-habit questions are used on a national scale to ascertain volunteerism and service ethic. Evaluating the Boettcher Scholarship was a nine-month process, which is just now nearing completion. Throughout this evaluation project, involving key stakeholders was critical, whether it was interviewing internal staff or including our Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board as alpha survey testers. As we approach the official survey launch, we look forward to using the results to better communicate our decades-long story and to express the return on the initial investment of the Boettcher family, and the Boettcher Foundation on each individual. And though we are constantly seeking ways to better engage our network, our commitment to the state remains the same—supporting the dynamic thinkers and leaders who will propel Colorado forward....

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Name: Elise Collins Scholar Year: 2014 Hometown: Highlands Ranch College(s), Degree(s) and Graduation Year(s): University of Colorado Boulder, BFA Performance Major and Leadership Minor, and (hopefully) graduating in 2018 What are you currently interested in pursuing after graduating? After college, I would like to perform theatre professionally and utilize theatre to create social change. I would like to start a theatre group that tells the stories of underrepresented groups and utilizes interactive methods to discuss social justice topics through performance. I hope to hold the mirror up to nature and provide audiences with the opportunity to rehearse how they would deal with various subjects in real life. Tell us about what activities, groups and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. In college I have been part of the Interactive Theatre Project, the Presidents Leadership Class, CU OnStage, salsa, blues and swing. The Interactive Theatre Project is a group that utilizes techniques from Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed to start dialogues about complex social issues and create positive social change. I joined this organization because I am passionate about social justice and theatre. The President’s Leadership Class has been a wonderful opportunity to study leadership, both in the classroom and in the real world. I have been president and secretary for CU OnStage, an organization that creates performance opportunities for students by organizing the annual CU Fringe Festival, a weekend full of free student performance art. I wanted to give students an opportunity to pursue their passion in an environment where it was safe to take risks and fail. I enjoy dancing salsa, blues and swing because it gives me a chance to listen to good music, move freely and spend time with friends. Tell us about an important mentor you have had. Angela Thieman Dino, my professor for multi-level issues in leadership, greatly influenced the way that I lead and approach new challenges. She helped me learn how to approach challenges from a mindset of abundance rather than a mindset of scarcity. Her guidance has taught me how to research, given me the tools to become an expert on any subject within a month and showed me how to view every concept through a variety of lenses – an individual lens, an interpersonal lens and an institutional lens. She has given me confidence, perspective and the courage to create positive social change. What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? I received the best advice in the form of a phrase from a director’s pre-show ritual. Before every show, the entire cast would recite the following phrase “Grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can and the wisdom to know the difference.” This quote always gives me perspective and strength in times of stress. It has shaped the way that I view the world and overcome obstacles in my life. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why? I would like to have dinner with William Shakespeare, Gandhi, Eleanor Roosevelt and Rosalind Franklin. I would ask Shakespeare about his writing process and the details about his life, ask Gandhi about his leadership style and finding a worthwhile cause to pursue, ask Eleanor Roosevelt for social activism advice and ask Rosalind Franklin about how she maintained such an incredible work ethic and overcame adversity within the male-dominated scientific community....

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Gergana Kostadinova. Name: Jose Martinez III Scholar Year: 2003 Hometown: Lakewood College(s), Degree(s) and Graduation Year(s): University of Northern Colorado, B.A. Social Science Secondary Education and an endorsement in ESL, 2007 Grand Canyon University, M.A. Educational Administration, 2010 Tell us about your current work and how long you’ve been doing it. What is your favorite aspect of your current occupation? I am currently getting into my 10th year of teaching high school social studies at Bear Creek High School in Jefferson County Public Schools. I teach economics, government, geography and broadcasting, and I think the most amazing part of my job is the fact that I get to help kids create pathways to their dreams. I feel like I have the ultimate privilege to have a direct hand in influencing the future. Every day I get to have fun at my job. What role has being a Boettcher Scholar played into where you are and what you are doing now? As a Boettcher Scholar I remember how amazing it felt to have the social and financial support of such an incredible organization as I began my own college career. Now that I teach in a Colorado high school, the topic of higher education is constantly addressed, and I feel like it is an honor and duty to help my students prepare for their future. I always feel an overwhelming sense of pride in being an alumni and talking about the foundation. I think this enthusiasm leaves a significant impact on my students and encourages them in their own journey. Tell us about your involvement in activities, organizations or groups outside of work. In terms of formal organizations, I’m a proud member of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board. Outside of that, my favorite activity involves spending time with my wife, Victoria, and my daughter, Penelope, but I also have a fairly wide range of hobbies. I began home-brewing a few years ago, and I love learning more each time a make a new batch. I DJ events from time to time and between gigs and my students, I am always getting a continual education in music. On top of that, I’m a huge tech nerd; I do graphic design and web design work on the side, and sometimes in the late evenings, I can get down on some Xbox with my buddies. What’s the best advice you’ve received and what advice do you have for current graduates entering your career field? I think the most amazing advice that I received at some point is best paraphrased by Conan O’Brien. He said, “If you work really hard and you’re kind, amazing things will happen.” I believe that success comes from doing more than the minimum even if no one ever recognizes it, and I always leave this sentiment with my students on the last day of class each semester. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why? Easy. I’d choose Ron Swanson, Tim Cook and the Loch Ness Monster. I’d pick Ron Swanson because it guarantees that our meal would be meaty, manly and would come with a side of scotch. I’d pick Tim Cook because I’d love to know what it’s like to try and innovate in the tech sector in 2016; plus I’m a huge fan of Apple products and Tim seems like a relatable guy. Lastly, I’d pick the Loch Ness Monster because then I’d have proof to go along with what I’ve always known....

An urban garden with an aquaponics greenhouse, a dental office and a preschool probably aren’t the first things that come to mind when most people think about mental health centers. But a new campus operated by Mental Health Center of Denver brings all of these things and more together in an effort to serve the community and engage with clients and would-be clients on a more holistic level. Mental Health Center of Denver celebrated the opening of its Dahlia Campus for Health and Well-Being in February. The campus, which received a $50,000 grant from the Boettcher Foundation, has become a model for community-centered mental health services. When Mental Health Center of Denver leaders decided to build a new site, they looked at the zip codes from which they were drawing clients. They realized that many clients were coming from northeast Denver, requiring a cross-town trip to any of the organization’s existing sites. When they selected northeast Denver, the group honed in on a site in a neighborhood that lacked many basic services. It was an area where, historically, developers promised new community facilities that never came to fruition. As such, Mental Health Center of Denver saw an opportunity, not only to bring their services to an area of need, but to provide services and outreach well-beyond their traditional focus. “We truly set out to meet the needs of the community,” said Ric Durity, vice president of development at the Mental Health Center of Denver. “We engaged in a dialogue with the community to determine what they needed.” In addition to door-to-door canvassing to meet with neighbors in the surrounding area, Mental Health Center of Denver staff held regular community meetings to learn about their needs. That sort of community input resulted in the multi-use center now known as Dahlia Campus for Health and Well-Being. Located on a four-acre site at 35th Avenue and Dahlia Street in northeast Denver, the campus features 46,000 square feet of indoor space, including traditional clinical space, a preschool, dental clinic, classrooms, community meeting space, a demonstration kitchen and recreation facilities. Outdoor components include play areas, therapy gardens and an urban farm with an aquaponics greenhouse where vegetables and fish are raised in a closed system. While Mental Health Center of Denver staff offer many of the services provided on the campus, they have partnered with other service providers, including Kids in Need of Dentistry (known as KIND) and the Sewall Child Development Center, which operates the on-site preschool. The urban farm and aquaponics garden were a direct response to the community’s need for access to fresh food – something that came up repeatedly during community meetings. Other offerings include yoga and tai chi, cooking classes and other programs that are offered free to the community. “What’s inspiring is when you see the essence and diversity of the community represented here,” Ric said. The campus has become a national model, and Mental Health Center of Denver staff regularly conduct tours and speak about the site to other mental health providers who are interested in better integrating their centers into the community. Recently, they provided a webinar to the National Council for Behavioral Health. By integrating so seamlessly with the community and offering ancillary services, the campus helps to reduce the stigma around mental health treatment while providing a welcoming presence. Joshua Pruyn, former development officer for Mental Health Center of Denver, recalled a recent incident when the staff was leaving at the end of the day, and a woman arrived at the campus following a domestic dispute.  Though it was after hours, the staff stayed to care for the woman. “She didn’t want to talk about mental health, but she came here because she knew it was a safe place.  She later ended up signing up for an appointment,” he said. The Boettcher Foundation was proud to provide capital funding for this project, not only because of the positive work Mental Health Center of Denver does, but because it represents the type of innovative thinking and the community partnerships and engagement that we seek to encourage. Community members who live near the site and contributed their ideas to its development have welcomed the campus with open arms. “I’m really proud to be associated with [Dahlia Campus],” said area resident Maya Wheeler. “When I hear people in the community talk about it, they talk about it like they are so proud, like ‘I had input in this place, I did this and that.' I’m just proud. I was a part of it, too.”...

Members of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board are interviewing their fellow Boettcher Scholars to help the community get to know one another better. The following Q&A was compiled by Boettcher Scholar Angelique Diaz. Name: Jared Russell Scholar Year: 2014 Hometown: Pueblo College(s), Degree(s) and Graduation Year(s): Colorado College, majoring in political science and philosophy; minoring music What are you currently interested in pursuing after graduating? Upon graduating from Colorado College, I plan on attending law school. Once I receive my J.D., I hope to work in a position that allows me to make a positive impact within my community. I would love to be a district attorney, and after some time, I wish to be appointed as a judge. My most ambitious of goals is to be appointed as a judge for the 10th Circuit of the U.S. Court of Appeals. The 10th Circuit includes the State of Colorado, and I would love to serve my state in such a capacity. Tell us about what activities, groups and/or organizations you have joined in college and why you joined them. Due to my interest in law, I compete on CC’s Mock Trial team. Additionally, I co-founded a chapter of the Roosevelt Institute at CC, a policy-writing group that seeks to engage young people in politics while making a positive difference. I am also a member of the Honor Council at CC, as I believe that academic integrity plays a key role on every college campus. I wanted to be more active in student life, so I joined Student Government (CCSGA) as the Parliamentarian. In addition, I also serve as a Writing Center tutor and a member of the President’s Council. Tell us about an important mentor you have had. The first professor that I had at CC, and my current academic advisor, is a political scientist named Tom Cronin. The transition into college is always subject to a steep learning curve, and going from an underfunded public high school to a private university, I was quite overwhelmed. Tom, in addition to being a great professor, legitimately cares about his students. He remembers every detail that you tell him about your life. He has pushed me to be a better student and a better person, and I can attribute many of my collegiate successes to his guidance What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? I interned at the District Attorney's Office in Pueblo over the summer between my freshman and sophomore year of college. In that time, I spent several weeks assisting two deputy D.A.'s who were assigned to a murder case. As I helped them prepare for the case, I remember speaking with one of these individuals at length one night about why he became a D.A. He passed me a photo of the victim’s mother during the conversation, and said that no amount of money was worth the feeling he received for upholding justice in the community in which he was raised. If you could have dinner with one person or a few people from history, whom would you choose and why? The legal nerd in me will continue to shine through in this question, as I would love to have dinner with Chief Justice Earl Warren who sat on the Supreme Court from 1953 to 1969. He served as the Chief Justice during cases such as Brown v. Board of Education, Miranda v. Arizona (the foundation of Miranda Rights), Gideon v. Wainwright (the right to an attorney if you cannot afford one), and many other landmark cases in the history of the United States. I cannot even imagine where I would want to begin the conversation with this man....