Author: Kristi Arellano

By Katie Rapone Confluence Denver The dynamic new leaders at three of Colorado's top nonprofit organizations share a vision for a better community. They also recognize that collaboration is a prerequisite for success. It may come as no surprise that some of the most influential pioneers of the world's first nonprofits had strong, compassionate females at the helm. Yet what is surprising is that even in this day and age, fewer women currently hold leadership positions at the nations nonprofits than men. According to a 2012 study by the University of Denver and The White House Project, women constitute only 21 percent of leadership roles among nonprofits with budgets in excess of $25 million, even though they make up 75 percent of the workforce. ...

March 2, 2016 — The Boettcher Foundation is pleased to announce that two leaders from diverse regions have been elected to the board of trustees. Tony Frank, president of Colorado State University, and Pam Shockley-Zalabak, chancellor of the University of Colorado Colorado Springs, will contribute their insight and leadership to the board. Comprised of 11 of Colorado’s most dynamic business and community leaders, the Boettcher Foundation Board of Trustees is responsible for supporting and guiding the foundation in its mission of investing in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. “In addition to their experience and insight into the state’s higher-education landscape, Pam and Tony bring a wealth of knowledge and dedication to improving our communities,” said Theodore F. Schlegel, chairman of the Boettcher Foundation Board of Trustees. “We are honored that they are bringing their talent and passion to the Boettcher Foundation, and we are especially pleased that they represent distinct areas of the state and can bring a unique perspective to the table.” Tony Frank is president of Colorado State University, where he works closely with faculty, staff, students and alumni. He was appointed president of the university in 2009, following roles as interim president, provost and senior vice president. His commitment to the mission of the land-grant university was shaped by his own experiences growing up on a farm in rural Illinois, and later by his experience as a student, faculty member and researcher. He earned his bachelor's degree in biology from Wartburg College and his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Illinois. He completed a Ph.D. and residencies in pathology and toxicology at Purdue University and served on the faculty at Oregon State University before joining Colorado State in 1993. He has served on several federal panels and was awarded the Carl J. Norden Distinguished Teaching Award at both Colorado State and Oregon State University. His research interests have included toxicologic and infectious disease pathology, and he has authored and co-authored numerous scientific publications. Frank’s background in research will play a valuable role on the Boettcher Foundation board. “I am honored to be part of a foundation that has had such a profound impact on our state and its people,” Frank said. “I am especially pleased to join such a committed and talented group of leaders who are committed to supporting individuals and nonprofits that are working hard and giving back on behalf of Colorado.” Pam Shockley-Zalabak is chancellor of the University of Colorado Colorado Springs. She continues to teach and research with students and is the author of nine books and more than 100 articles and productions focusing on organizational communication. Her research is concentrated on organizational trust, and her most recent book, "Fundamentals of Organizational Communication," was published in 2015. Born in Texas and raised in Oklahoma, Shockley-Zalabak earned bachelor's and master's degrees in communication from Oklahoma State University, Stillwater. Later, she earned a Ph.D. in Organizational Communication from University of Colorado Boulder. Shockley-Zalabak is the recipient of several awards, including the Chancellor's Award for Distinguished Faculty, the Colorado Springs Chamber of Commerce ATHENA Women in Business Award, the 2005 Student Choice for Instructor of the Year, the 2008 Colorado Springs Business Journal Women of Influence Award, the 2013 Pikes Peak Range Riders Silver Spur Award, the S. Jerrard Smith award for contributions to the community, and the American Red Cross Humanitarian of the Year Award. Shockley-Zalabak‘s expertise in organizational communication will be an asset to the Boettcher Foundation as it sets goals for the future. “The Boettcher family made an indelible mark on Colorado, and I’m pleased to help continue their legacy,” Shockley-Zalabak said. “I’m looking forward to engaging with the foundation, its staff and its community as we continue to propel Colorado forward.” Download a PDF version of this press release here. About the Boettcher Foundation At Boettcher we believe in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. Every day we champion excellence across our state by investing in our most talented citizens and high-potential organizations, because supporting their hard work and leadership will enable them to give back for years to come. For more information, visit www.boettcherfoundation.org. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Kristi Arellano 303.285.6208 kristi@boettcherfoundation.org...

  By Debbie Kelley The Gazette A Gazette "Best and Brightest" from 1993 has continued on the up-and-coming path she started in high school. Throughout her career, Rampart High School graduate Katie Kramer, nee Stanich, has maintained her teenage philosophy to "bring people together, get them involved and feeling like a team." Kramer now is positioned to take over as the fifth president and executive director of the 78-year-old Boettcher Foundation. The Denver-based philanthropic powerhouse annually awards full-ride scholarships to 42 high school seniors to attend in-state colleges or universities. ...

A group of students from Iraq got a unique lesson in entrepreneurship and risk-taking when they visited Denver, thanks to a connection forged by a pair of Boettcher Scholars. Gergana Kostadinova and Kara Penn got to know one another through their involvement in the Boettcher Alumni Steering Committee and subsequent membership on the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board. Gergana, a 2009 Boettcher Scholar and graduate of the University of Denver, coordinates exchange programs for WorldDenver, a nonprofit community organization dedicated to advancing a deep understanding of global affairs and cultures. One of her duties included preparing a program for participants in the Iraqi Young Leaders Exchange Program, which is sponsored and funded by the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad and administered by World Learning in partnership with WorldDenver. The group consisted of 11 students ages 15-17 and one adult Iraqi mentor, along with a World Learning staff member. A specific goal of the visit was to help the students learn about entrepreneurship, so Gergana and her colleagues thought it was important for the youth to learn about how to make smart mistakes and take educated risks. Fortunately, Kara literally wrote the book on the subject. Kara, a 1994 Boettcher Scholar and graduate of Colorado College, and her co-author Anjali Sastry, focused on smart mistakes in their book Fail Better, which examines how people and organizations can innovate, take risks and learn from their mistakes. Although Kara has frequently presented on the topic, she had never done so for the age group Gergana was working with. But Kara adapted her program, and the result was a workshop that positively engaged students with a difficult topic. “The thing that stood out to me was how open the students were,” Kara said. “They could talk in a nuanced way about the restrictions they felt in their culture around failure.” The students carried Kara’s lessons with them throughout their visit, which also included a civic engagement workshop, volunteer project and other lectures. Gergana noticed many of them using phrases like “fail better” and “make smart mistakes” in subsequent discussions throughout the week. The collaboration was a great reminder for both Kara and Gergana of the power of the Boettcher community. “It was great to know there is a Boettcher network of very successful individuals who are willing to work together,” Gergana said. “Knowing that I could reach out to Kara and be confident that she would open my email and not hesitate to ask questions or voice concerns and be willing to help me run with an idea is an incredible thing.” Kara added that knowing a person is a member of the Boettcher community can function like a stamp of approval. “Working with another Boettcher, you know that more often than not, things are going to go really well and that it will be an incredible opportunity,” she said.    ...

By Bridgett Weaver Greeley Tribune Watching him laugh and joke about his blindness in front of a crowd, you’d never expect that there was a time when Landan Schaffert felt bad for himself. You’d never guess that people told him he couldn’t do something — mostly because he always did it, anyway. And you’d never guess that the loss of a close friend is what caused him to stop feeling bad for himself. ...

Sam Bowersox-Daly got a double-dose of Boettcher during one of his earliest assignments in the Boettcher Teacher Residency. Sam, a 2010 graduate of Colorado State University, was selected for the Boettcher Teacher Residency following five years with The Global Livingston Institute and Apple Inc. He is currently teaching social studies under the guidance of mentor teacher Cyndi Gentile at Bear Creek High School in Lakewood. Since mentorship and hands-on classroom learning are cornerstones of the Boettcher Teacher Residency, Sam was asked to observe other teachers in his department. That project took him into the classroom of Jose Martinez, a 2003 Boettcher Scholar and member of the Boettcher Scholar Alumni Board. Sam’s observations offered powerful insight into what makes a great teacher. “Jose is a teacher that goes above and beyond to elevate his own teaching and to help others improve their practice,” Sam said. Jose, a graduate of the University of Northern Colorado, isn’t just any teacher. He was recognized with a Milken Educator Award in 2013. The award honors the top educators throughout the country. In addition, Jose was a finalist for the 2015 Colorado Department of Education Teacher of the Year Award. When Sam observed Jose’s class, Jose was teaching a freshmen honors course. Students were in the midst of making Facebook profiles for well-known government philosophers. “I immediately noticed Jose's use of collective voice to bring the class together, discussing their work from days before and framing the agenda for the day,” Sam recalled. Jose is eager to guide new teachers and said he feels a special kinship with Boettcher Teachers. “The opportunity to guide and support a Boettcher Teacher was a very invigorating experience,” Jose said, adding that he is consistently impressed with the caliber of residents selected for the program. “My only hope as a veteran teacher is that I can contribute in a way that I can assist these Boettcher Teachers in changing the world for the better.” If Sam’s experience is any indication, Jose is well on his way to doing just that. “In my short time at Bear Creek, Jose has been an amazing resource and consistently available to help in any way possible,” he said. “As a department chair and fellow Boettcher connection, Jose is a great leader and invaluable resource.”...

  By Amy DiPierro BusinessDen Twenty-three years ago, Katie Kramer received a full-ride scholarship from Colorado nonprofit the Boettcher Foundation. Now she’s in charge of handing them out. On Sunday, Kramer was named the next executive director and president of the Denver-based Boettcher Foundation. As the fifth person to lead the nonprofit since its founding, Kramer, 40, will watch over assets valued at over $300 million, according to 2014 tax documents. When the Boettcher Foundation started in 1937, it funded primarily major construction projects for nonprofits. Today it funds not just capital campaigns, but also biomedical research, undergraduate scholarships for in-state students and a five-year education program for aspiring teachers. ...

By Aldo Svaldi The Denver Post The Boettchers, like other titanic Colorado business families, funneled their hard-won wealth into a family foundation. Their foundation is best known for providing more than 2,400 promising high school students full-ride scholarships to Colorado colleges and universities since 1952. That investment has now come full circle. Katie Kramer, one of those Boettcher scholars, will succeed Tim Schultz as the foundation's executive director and president. "He has taught me everything I know," Kramer said of Schultz. "He has been a fantastic mentor and a fabulous friend." ...

To our community, We are writing today because we want you to be among the first to know about an exciting step in the Boettcher Foundation’s history. The board of trustees of the Boettcher Foundation recently approved a succession plan under which Katie Kramer, currently vice president and assistant executive director of the foundation, will succeed Tim Schultz as president and executive director upon Tim’s retirement on July 31, 2017. As many of you know, Katie has spent nearly 20 years in multiple roles at the Boettcher Foundation. A Boettcher Scholar herself, Katie has led nearly all of the foundation’s programming areas and played a key role both in directing the foundation’s day-to-day operations and establishing its long-term strategic vision. Those of you who have worked with Katie know she is committed to the ideals of the Boettcher family and has the skills and passion to ensure that the foundation continues its mission of investing in the promise of Colorado and the potential of Coloradans. Katie will be only the fifth executive director in the Boettcher Foundation’s 78-year history. She is also a trailblazer, becoming the youngest person to lead the foundation, as well as the first woman and first Boettcher Scholar to do so. If you don't know her, we encourage you to learn more about Katie. Tim notified the board of his plans to retire in mid-2017, prompting us to launch the succession-planning process with enough time to ensure that the leadership transition was both thoughtful and seamless. As stewards of the Boettcher Foundation, we spent a great deal of time considering all of our options. We determined that the best-practice for the Boettcher Foundation was to appoint a talented leader who has grown her career within the foundation. In the coming months, the executive committee of the Boettcher Foundation Board of Trustees will work to establish a formal transition process with input from Tim and Katie. Both Tim and Katie have worked side-by-side for nearly two decades, and they share a commitment to the Boettcher family’s founding vision and ideals. We look forward to updating you on the transition process as we move forward, and we are confident that the Boettcher Foundation is well-positioned for the future. Thank you, Theodore F. Schlegel, M.D. Chairman, Boettcher Foundation Board of Trustees  ...